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Sulzer RND Diesel
Sulzer RND Diesel

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rederiert



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Registered: November 2005
Posts: 375
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· Date: Thu, 10 February 11 · Views: 1,116
· Filesize: 94.9kb, 95.0kb · Dimensions: 695 x 900 ·
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Keywords: Sulzer RND Diesel
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MarEng

Senior Member

Registered: August 2006
Location: NL
Posts: 199
Thu, 10 February 11 14:44

The RND, that was a fine engine!
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Steve Oatey

Senior Member

Registered: February 2008
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 1,214
Sat, 12 February 11 15:03

My favourite.
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Doxfordman

Senior Member

Registered: March 2005
Location: Hobart, Tasmania
Posts: 2,128
Sun, 13 February 11 03:00

Rotary exhaust valve gone, but more and more reed valves, not a patch on the B&W of the time and of course the J Type Doxford.

------------------------------
Dox (R907127)
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MarEng

Senior Member

Registered: August 2006
Location: NL
Posts: 199
Sun, 13 February 11 06:31

Hi Doxfordman,

Since English is not my native language, I had to look on the Inet to find out what You meant with "Reed valves".
I learnt something new! Thanks.
We just named them "scavenge air valves", and it was indeed important to keep them maintained properly.
Slide your fingers over the stainless steel plates, Trrrrrrrrrrrrrr!
The only problem I had with an RND90 was a cracked inner cylinderhead.
With the increase of the bmep with the RND-M type, Sulzer changed the design of the cylinderhead which became a forged-steel bore-cooled head. (which also caused some trouble, but that is a different story)
But, that is all history as we all know.

Regards, Jan.
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rederiert
Senior Member

Registered: November 2005
Posts: 375
Sun, 13 February 11 10:15

Yes that rotary exhaust valve could realy be a weak part. Bad HFO with brooken piston rings as a result in this Sulzer type give the enginecrew a lot of headick. If only one of this vingplate was bended from a pice of pistonring you loose scav.air pressure in the cylinder.
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MarEng

Senior Member

Registered: August 2006
Location: NL
Posts: 199
Sun, 13 February 11 12:50

Adjusting the timing of the rotary exhaust valve on the RD engine could be a tricky job.
In case you had to renew the valve adjacent to the timing gear wheels, (e.g. in case of damaged vanes) correct adjustment of the linkage was paramount, otherwise the timing of the valves connected to that side of the engine would be wrong as well.
Regards, Jan
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Doxfordman

Senior Member

Registered: March 2005
Location: Hobart, Tasmania
Posts: 2,128
Mon, 14 February 11 01:02

Mar Eng - Your English is certainly much, much better than my Dutch! We called them reed valves, one way, none return plates I guess and yes they used Trrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.

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Dox (R907127)
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Derek Roger
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Registered: February 2005
Location: Rothesay New Brunswick
Posts: 7,113
Mon, 14 February 11 09:51

I liked the RD except for one instance when the 3rd Eng was setting the exhaust valve timing after changing out a couple of rotary valves > He did not understand the servo system and that when he went past the timing mark on the turning gear he would just turn back until the mark lined up instead of keep turning ahead until the mark came in line again .
On starting the engine it sounded like a bag of hammers . After some discussion with the 3 rd we checked the timing and it was way off.
Had to start from scratch and reset all the valve timing after which she ran as smooth as silk .
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MarEng

Senior Member

Registered: August 2006
Location: NL
Posts: 199
Mon, 14 February 11 14:44

Hi Derek,
That's a kind of mistake a 3th eng should not make. Apparently he did not understand the phenomenon backlash in timing gear wheels as well!
Be sure to have the camshaft in the "ahead" direction, turn the engine in that direction and keep it that way as you said.
But afterwards it is easy to point the finger. We all made mistakes, at least I did!
On board of a ship it can be difficult (even dangerous) when mistakes are made: what was the reason? Lack of motivation, knowledge, experience or...personal problems distracting him from the job???
Best regards,
Jan
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Derek Roger
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Registered: February 2005
Location: Rothesay New Brunswick
Posts: 7,113
Mon, 14 February 11 17:09

Hi Jan ; We had for the most part in the 60,s 70,s very good engineering staff in Brocklebanks . Most were old hands with lots of experience and a lot of ex Eng Apprentices who had moved up in the ranks . There was however a bit of a shortage and that was supplemented from the shipping pool . Some were great and some less so .
The gentleman I referred to was in the latter category ; he was a very pleasant chap and good company but somewhat deficient in the skills required for modern diesel engines .
Against the recommendation of the Chief Engineer he was rehired on the new vessels which had Pielstick Engines ; during his period with about 5 of our vessels he during routine cylinder / piston maintenance managed to install all the scraper rings upside down ( Causing huge lubricating oil consumption ) That in itself took about a year to research and rectify .
His other claim to fame was that he was a good machinist ; however while working on the lathe he was not sure if he was properly engaged for screw cutting and opened the gear guard and stuck his finger in as he thought the wheels were not turning . Lost the end of his index finger .

For weeks after that incident when sitting at the bar having a beer he would examine the end of his finger for ages ( much to the amusement of the rest of us )

He was a good shipmate and I tell the story with no derogatory thoughts .

It was the way it was . Derek
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Hamish Mackintosh
Senior Member

Registered: January 2006
Posts: 2,567
Mon, 14 February 11 19:58

How was the blower driven on this type of engine, and how were they cooled? If I remember correctly we had a Sultzer driving a compressor (way back in the distant past)that was air cooled, but we never saw it in the shop much as it seemed to "Just Run".Of course that engine was nowhere near the size of a marine engine.
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Derek Roger
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Registered: February 2005
Location: Rothesay New Brunswick
Posts: 7,113
Mon, 14 February 11 20:22

The blowers on Mahout and her sister ship were Turbo blowers ( Brown Boveri )and they were water cooled by the main engine jacket cooling system . There were vents in the uppermost parts of the blower leading to the jacket water header tank ; they were very small bore pipes and one had to make sure they did not block up as that would have caused an air lock and overheating of the blowers . The BB blowers were excellent with very few problems .
The rotary exhaust valves were also water cooled from the jacket cooling system and their shaft glands were fed with lube oil from the main engine lubricating system .
hope than answers your question .

Regards Derek
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rederiert
Senior Member

Registered: November 2005
Posts: 375
Tue, 15 February 11 07:48

On the RND type as you can see on the picture there is an electrical fan that starts at low rpm.
To get up the scav.air pressure on the Götaverken f.ex. they kept the internal scav.punp even with turbochargers.
With better combustion at low speed. In port it was many time easy to see what ship had a Sulzer or MAN main engines,
They usually had a lot more black smoke at start. Today they also have exhaust valve in top cover.
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Stuart Smith

Senior Member

Registered: October 2004
Posts: 3,762
Tue, 15 February 11 15:12

I have thoroughly enjoyed the discussions on this threat gentlemen. Thank you.
ps. Sailed with a Sulzer RD 76 on MV Mahout
Stuart
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Derek Roger
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Registered: February 2005
Location: Rothesay New Brunswick
Posts: 7,113
Tue, 15 February 11 17:20

Stuart ;
Dont we both wish we could relive those happy days . Cheers Derek
PS hope retirement is not boring you .
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