19:16

Welcome
Welcome!Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. And what's more, it's completely FREE.

Click here to go to the forums home page and find out more.
Click here to join.
Log in
User Name Password

  Home · Search · Register  

Home » Cargo vessels Photo Options

« Previous image · Next image »

P1000256_SN_
Penguin Arrow

« Previous image  · Slide Show · Next image »


Photo Details
YM-Mundrabilla



Senior Member

Registered: March 2008
Location: Mundrabilla, of course (haha), Melbourne really but I'd rather be in Narvik
Posts: 2,889
View Gallery Profile Send PM users gallery
Penguin Arrow, Carrington (Newcastle) NSW
Tug is Svitzer Myall
28 November 2010
· Date: Sat, 29 March 14 · Views: 228
· Tags: 1 · Filesize: 405.7kb · Dimensions: 1024 x 613 ·
Additional Info
Keywords: Penguin Arrow
Source of Image, If not your own: My own
Location Photo was taken: Carrington NSW
Date photo was taken: 28 November 2010
« more
IMGP6668_SN_.jpg
IMGP2047.JPG
IMGP0320_SN_.jpg
IMGP3829_SN_.jpg
IMGP1159_SN_.jpg
IMGP0246_SN_.jpg
P1000066_SN_.jpg
IMGP1272_SN_.jpg
IMGP1002_SN_.jpg
IMGP0645.JPG
P1000256_SN_.jpg
P1000012_SN_.jpg
P1000001_2_.jpg
IMGP7738_SN_.jpg
IMGP7704_SN_.jpg
IMGP3855_SN_.jpg
IMGP9089_SN_.jpg
IMGP8649_SN_.jpg
IMGP4303_SN_.jpg
IMGP0938.JPG
IMGP0277_SN_.jpg
· more »

Author
Thread  
YM-Mundrabilla

Senior Member

Registered: March 2008
Location: Mundrabilla, of course (haha), Melbourne really but I'd rather be in Narvik
Posts: 2,889
Sat, 29 March 14 05:34

As a railwayman, I have to ask you seafarers what happens to those gantries (whatever they are) in heavy seas, please?

Edited to add a belated please.
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
G Eyre
Member

Registered: February 2014
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 30
Sat, 29 March 14 06:02

Re your question; the gantries are driven back to the position as shown in the photograph, they are then jacked up so that the main wheels are clear of the deck, a spacer is fitted to maintain this gap and then a large (approx 100mm dia.) high tensile bolt is screwed down at the base of each of the vertical legs, the retaining bolt sits on top of a hydraulically operated collar which is then pressurized by a portable pump to approximately 4,000 psi effectively "stretching'' the bolt and securely fixing the crane to the deck, one of the gantry ships rolled to over 50 degrees in a storm some yeas ago and the cranes, which weigh around 250 tons each, didn't move at all. It could be interesting when undoing the cranes on arrival at a port if the hydraulic collar jammed, requiring some real out of the box thinking to get the crane moving and working cargo - hope this helps
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
G Eyre
Member

Registered: February 2014
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 30
Sat, 29 March 14 06:19

I guess I should also try for a brief explanation of their function, basically they are a traveling gantry crane as can be seen in many heavy engineering workshops, they have arms that extend from the main frame in port and retract at sea along which a gantry unit travels, the gantry unit carries all the hoisting gear and the driver cab is suspended below the main chassis so that the driver can see at all times what is happening, the crane also travels up and down the deck, it sits over a selected hold and picks up cargo units then travels out over the ships side and proceeds to lower the load onto the wharf or truck etc it then drives back over the hold and repeats the operation, obviously the reverse is true when it comes to loading, the cranes are very efficient and can move cargo very quickly, they also have a range of cargo handling attachments that fit onto the place where a hook would normally go on a standard crane, this gives them the ability to use hydraulically operated grabs, pneumatically operated hoist frames for lifting aluminum ingots and vacuum operated clamps for handling rolls of paper etc
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
YM-Mundrabilla

Senior Member

Registered: March 2008
Location: Mundrabilla, of course (haha), Melbourne really but I'd rather be in Narvik
Posts: 2,889
Sat, 29 March 14 07:21

Mr Eyre, very many thanks for your prompt, comprehensive and concise responses.

Penquin Arrow was at Carrington loading aluminium ingots when I was there inspecting rail coal hoppers unloaded from Beluga Foresight and I was intrigued at what, to me anyway, appeared a cumbersome contraption on an otherwise good looking vessel. This is obviously an exception to the rule that 'if it doesn't look right it probably isn't'!!

Does the bone coloured cladding (whatever) remain attached at sea or is it removed, please?

Regards
YM
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
A.D.FROST

Senior Member

Registered: September 2008
Location: Sunderland by the Sea
Posts: 3,139
Sat, 29 March 14 07:22

Maiden voyage via Sunderland to have her cranes put on by floating crane
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
John Timmins

Senior Member

Registered: November 2010
Location: Ormond by the Sea, Florida
Posts: 492
Sat, 29 March 14 09:42

Without ever seeing this, from what you described, I would address the problem like this. If it's like main engine head nuts, there is a washer under that hydraulic thing. When the hydraulic thing fails you have to remove that washer. This is done by drilling a very small hole into the side of the washer all the way through. Then the next larger drill is used, then the next. This is repeated until the hole is almost the thickness of the washer. the diameter of the last hole drilled depends on the bravery of the guy drilling the holes.

Curing this problem is not for the faint of heart. A round drift is placed in the hole which is then struck with a sledge hammer. That washer will split and the two halves can be driven out from under that hydraulic nut. A new washer, and there should be several on board, will go in service after the hydraulic thing gets new orings and seals etc.

The above cure might not go well for the driller, the guy with the sledge hammer, or anybody standing nearby. The chief engineer MUST stand up to the captain and firmly describe the proceedure beforehand. The repair must be videotaped in case somebody gets hurt (like me). the other option is to tell the captain to order a shore gang, and let them do it. I couldn't care less if carge operations are delayed or sailing. We have our own problems to address down below.

I always left home with two small drill indexes with NEW drills of HSS and another with cobalt drill bits. I took multiples of the smallest, hard to sharpen sizes to be used in special projects like this - the ship won't have them.....too cheap to order them. A $75 fee for their use will be padded onto my overtime sheet to use them or I will sell then to the captain for that price...or he can order a shore gang.
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
Wallace Slough
Senior Member

Registered: March 2009
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 1,827
Sat, 29 March 14 10:28

YM-Mundrabilla
The "bone coloured cladding" is fiberglass rain protection for the cranes and cargo. It shields the cargo and enables the ships to work in light rain. As these types of ships often carry newsprint rolls, it's a valuable addition.
I piloted both Star Shipping and Gearbulk vessels in San Francisco for many years. They are an innovative design with their open hatches and gantry cranes which enables the fast movement of bulk cargoes such as granulated fertilizer and newsprint rolls. Over time, I saw the size of the gantry cranes lifting capability increase dramatically. Whereas the earlier vessels had cranes that lifted a maximum of about 35 tons as I recall, the later ones were capable of lifting 63 tons, and I understand they are even higher today.
The open hatches which extend the full width of the hold and the lack of tween decks allow the ships to be incredibly efficient. They're certainly not good looking ships (like most modern vessels), but they're very efficient ships.
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
Bno
Senior Member

SN Supporter


Registered: August 2005
Location: Santa Pola Spain
Posts: 39,109
Sat, 29 March 14 10:28

.


IMO 9151814 , Call Signal C6PA6 , Flag Bahamas.
Class : Det Norske Veritas.
Ship Type : Gantry Craned Open Hatch Bulk /Forest Product Carrier.
Build in 1997 by Dalian New Shipyard Dalian China as " PENGUIN ARROW " for Gearbulk Shipowning Ltd ( Kristian Gerhard Jebsen Skipsrederi A/S Bergen Norway as manager ) Nassau Bahamas.

Tonnage : grt / nrt / tdw - 36.008 / 14.195 / 51.800.
Main.Engine : MAN-B&W 6L60MC - bhp.
Aux.Engine : Bergen Diesel KRG-5 - 3 x kw.
Emerg.Gen : MAN D2866E - 1 x kw.
Exh/Aux.Boiler : Aalborg Composite.

.
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
G Eyre
Member

Registered: February 2014
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 30
Sat, 29 March 14 10:33

Hi YM, Re your query about the "Cladding" it does stay in place all the time and is for weather protection for the cargo in the hold being worked by the crane, one of the many different cargoes handled by Gearbulk ships is paper pulp; its dried in sheet form and palletised, paper expands when wet and the effect on hatch covers is catastrophic, many of the loading ports are on the west coast of Canada in areas renowned for their rainfall so the cladding is a quick and effective fix as it allows work to proceed in all weathers, that being said not all Gearbulk ships are fitted with the cladding and I have never sailed on one even though we carried paper pulp and other bulk cargoes such as Kaolin clay, and malted barley etc.
Cheers
Graham Eyre
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
YM-Mundrabilla

Senior Member

Registered: March 2008
Location: Mundrabilla, of course (haha), Melbourne really but I'd rather be in Narvik
Posts: 2,889
Sat, 29 March 14 18:48

Gentlemen,
Many thanks for the information that you have provided. It is much appreciated.
Regards
Geoff (YM)
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
ben27

Senior Member

Registered: December 2012
Location: brisbane
Posts: 10,666
Sat, 29 March 14 20:39

good day ym-mundrabilla,m,sat 29th march.reenguin arrow.fine looking ship.great photo.the members post's of the fitting of deck cargo most interesting,to all thankyou.regards ben27
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
Enri
Senior Member

Registered: June 2008
Location: Whitstable
Posts: 1,456
Sun, 30 March 14 03:23

The only thing I hated about these cranes was testing them. With the booms extended, the driver had to trundle the cab outboard at full speed to test the limit switches. There were buffers at each end, but I would have hated to have hit one, I expect with HSE, they have now found a somewhat safer method. The older type cranes also had a disadvantage where the whole hook assembly had to be removed for the fitting of a grab, container, or paper probes, I think on the later ships they just "clip" on. This involved unreaving the wires, which was a long process trying to even up the lengths to level the table. An all hands job, as I found out on my first gearbulker, having completed a night shift had to stay up all day to change from grab to hook, then lo and behold it was my shift again, not a happy bunny!
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
Pat McCardle

Senior Member

Registered: June 2005
Location: SUNDERLAND
Posts: 6,177
Sun, 30 March 14 04:17

YM, take a look in the Gallery for further photos of this vessel being fitted with the cranes here in sunderland. Just type the Vessel's name in the search box and they will come up.
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  

Photo Sharing Gallery by PhotoPost
Copyright © 2007 All Enthusiast, Inc.



Support SN


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.