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Garden_Reach_Calcutta_c_1880
Garden Reach, Calcutta, c.1880.

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Hugh Ferguson



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Registered: September 2006
Posts: 5,535
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This photograph shows the unchanging fashion in which ships were moored in the stream at Garden Reach, Calcutta. The process of securing a ship in the fast flowing Hooghly river would take about 4 hours. Both anchors had to be hung off and 2 shackles of chain detached and transported aft, where they would be hauled up through the after fairleads, crossed and shackled to the underside of the buoys; the buoys having been up-ended by a mooring gang working on a barge which had a hand operated derrick for the purpose.
I observed the same process taking place 65 years later, but on that occasion with the addition of enormous coir bore springs.
· Date: Thu, 8 February 07 · Views: 456
· Tags: 1 · Filesize: 93.1kb · Dimensions: 252 x 347 ·
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Keywords: Garden Reach, Calcutta, c.1880.
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stein
Senior Member

Registered: November 2006
Location: Norway
Posts: 14,743
Fri, 9 February 07 03:56

The ship is the Glengarry. According to Lubbock, she was called the clipper of the Indian Ocean owing to her good looks and fast passages to and fro Calcutta, and was considered at her launch to be the finest ship built.
Built by Royden in 1873, she was one of the first ships with double topgallants (out of sight in this picture) and was very heavily rigged aloft with a mainyard 96 feet long. On her second passage to Calcutta she took 92 days and on her third 79. She made a number of passages in under 90 days. She was a lucky ship, but in 93 her luck left her: a cyclone struck her after leaving Calcutta, the mainmast went overboard, smashing the boats and the pumps; hope seemed gone. The French mail steamer Eridan found her then, stood by till the worst of the cyclone was gone, and with the loss of two of her own life boats managed to take off the crew. The ship did not sink however, but was later towed to Calcutta, and condemned.
Her owners were Alexander & Nott (Scott?), MacVicar, Marshall & Co and lastly Powell & Co. Stein
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Hugh Ferguson

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Registered: September 2006
Posts: 5,535
Fri, 9 February 07 13:59

I have managed to decipher the port of registry as LIVERPOOL but have not been able to read a single letter of the name.
Thanks, Stein, for that information. I assume you were able to make a positive identification after your initial uncertainty. I hadn't thought to name the ship as my objective had been to demonstrate the way ships were moored at Garden Reach. Perhaps my contribution to The Lighthouse, in the Brocklebank file would be of interest to you.
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stein
Senior Member

Registered: November 2006
Location: Norway
Posts: 14,743
Sat, 10 February 07 01:00

I would have liked to say that I found her by intelligent deduction, but truth is: I stumbled across her while on the wrong track. Found a picture of her in Lubbock's "Last of the Windjammers", same mooring place, nearly the same perspective.
Read your posts on the cinema and the mooring in the Brocklebanks file. Never been there myself, but according to you and others writing of the place, I didn't miss anything that should be missed with regret. Stein.
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