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2nd. Mate, Glenbank, '55-ish

2nd. Mate, Glenbank, '55-ish

2nd. Mate on the old Glenbank en route Panama-Australia on 53 day trip. He it was, I think, who mentioned to an Aussie docker that fresh water for showering was still being hand pumped and carried from aft by the apprentices every day, resulting in immediate blacking of the vessel on the Aussie coas

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Reminds me of my first trip as third mate loading freezer on the Aussie coast for the Persian Gulf. Wharfie asked me what was the temperature in the freezers and I innocently told him. They all walked off saying it was too cold to work in there! Was I a popular little boy!
 

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And a very pot-bellied docker in Darwin who talked about the starving children who could not get their oranges for Christmas because we were alongside discharging sulphur and using the berth for the vessel at anchor.
So we sailed back to Cairns or Townsville to discharge. And lost Christmas alongside.
 

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Bank Line ships 1953 to 1968, Apprentice to Master
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Discharging cocoa beans in Philadelphia. Wharfies hung a clock thermometer on the hold ladder at the top of the cargo stow and said that when the needle got to 90 degrees Fahrenheit they would walk off the ship! That and the acetic acid gas from the beans made working in the hold most uncomfortable. They walked off and we had to take the cocoa beans (from Papua New Guinea) to Liverpool where they were containerized and sent back to Philadelphia!
 

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Ray, have you any idea who that 2nd Mate was ? Ah yes, the Aussie Wharfies, a breed of their own. I soon learned, if you spoke to them in their own crude lingo, with plenty of bastXXds and , my bloody oath mate, thrown in, then you were fair dinkum mate.
 

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Alistair,
I had no idea that there was such a problem with cocoa beans. We carried a cargo of cocoa beans on one occasion on one ED vessel to Liverpool and were actually complimented indirectly by the brokers concerned for the excellent state of the cargo. A once only compliment of that kind.
Did the acid come off the beans because of the temperature?
Charlie,
It is one of my regrets that with very few exceptions I simply don't remember the names of those with whom I sailed. And that is not just the Bankline ex-colleagues.
 

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Ray, Alistair is refering to that pungent smell you got from the cocoa beans, especially in poor ventilated spaces. If you carried cocoa beans in the reefer lockers, Eastbank, then you would certainly remember that smell, very sharp, like a needle being shoved up your nose. How could a young chap like you possibly forget that ? I can smell it by just thinking about it, ah, must go make a cuppa cocoa.
 

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Can't remember carrying it on Bankline ships but did on a number of occasions on E.D's.
Still can't remember the smell! Or much else accurately for that matter!
 

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a very pungent smell if Cocoa Beans started heating up , hence better off with el.vent and at least 15 a.c.p.h. Agree with Charlie that the best way to do with the Aussie Wharfies was to fight fire with fire. Once told a bolshie gang of them (and wondered what would happen to me) , "Look mate, we came here voluntarily , you ba****** got brought here" - Laughed their heads off and we were the best of mates from then on(Thumb)
 

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So, Stumps, if you dunnaged the cargo perfectly and stowed it immaculately then it did not smell. That must have been what we were doing!!
 

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And how did this 2nd Mate in the photo, get us going on about cocoa beans anyway?, mind you he has that devious look about him.(Jester)
 

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