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BREMEN

BREMEN

BREMEN

IMO 5051145

1938 completed by Chantiers & At. de St.Nazaire (Penhoet), St.Nazaire,
for Compagnie de Navigacion Sud-Atlantique
32.336GRT, 212m loa, 26.8m br., 60.000shp max., 4 steam turbines Parsons geared to 4 shafts, 23kn, passengers: 216 1st, 906 tourist class, crew: 544

1938 fr. PA

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A unique-looking liner that one could identify instantly, from miles away. (And I did once, standing a helm watch aboard USS TATTNALL in the Caribbean. The captain was on deck and asked me "The Bremen? Are you sure? From this distance?" To which I answered "Perfectly sure, sir."
 

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Her windows rows are very unique as well. To fit such an old ship, close to 30 years old, with a bulbous bow was, I must say, very ambitious. Was it such an urgent technical need for that reconstruction? However, it is quite rare that passenger ships and ferries are fitted with bulbous bows after delivery and many yeras in service, I just remember some handful cases actually.

Is she still working as a hotel ship at Jeddah?
 

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She was built as the most modern and luxuriuos ship for the service from Europe to the La Plata competing with ships like CAP ARCONA (Hamburg Süd), ANDES (1939) and the sister ships ALCANTARA and ASTURIAS (Royal Mail). ANDES, completed in 1939 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, was immediately taken over for trooping and started her regular service to the La Plata in 1946. She was withdrawn in 1959 and used as a cruise ship by Royal Mail.
 

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To answer Naucler's question--no, she isn't still working as a hotel ship at Jeddah. She sank under tow to the breakers, as SAUDI FILIPINAS 1, in 1980. There are some rather dramatic photographs you may find here or elsewhere on the web if you Google that name. She sank stern-first, so there's some rather good shots of that bulbous bow hanging high in the air as she sank.

This is a truly fine portrait of her in her best incarnation, after that preposterous orginal French funnel had been replaced.
 

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Thanks jaguar06! Yes, I guessed, for myself, that she didn't survive into our times, the classic Arab maintainance of ships in combination of the harsh and hot climate and the high levelled salt water told me that she wouldn't be there for long after the late 1960's (I have with this comment nothing at all against Arab or oriental cultures, but I know by experience that ships, especially older ships, there have, so to say, a quite hard life in that part of the world...)
 

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One of the owners was Norddeutscher Lloyd. Does anyone - by the way - know why have so many maritime organisations and shipping companies called themselves "lloyds". There is of course the original Lloyd's, an insurance company and most comprehensive register of merchant shipping. Then there are Norddeutscher Lloyd, Hapag Lloyd, Nedlloyd, Lloyd Triestino... What does Lloyd mean in this context or why did all these companies call themselves lloyds? Many thanks, if any reader or maritime historian among readers can explain the story behind all these lloyds.
 

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poseidon,

I think the answer to your question is here:

In mid 19thC an Austrian shipping insurance company, based on the idea of Lloyds of London, was set up but subsequently went into the shipping business themselves.
I gather that all the other 'Lloyds' shipping companies are descendants or offshoots of this one.
Basically they just 'borrowed' the name to give the impression that they were trustworthy - before international trade marks and suchlike.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%96sterreichischer_Lloyd
 

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