Ships Nostalgia banner
British Trader Poop Deck

British Trader Poop Deck

Down aft on the Trader, taken in Lake Charles, Louisiana on the 3rd of July 2003.
Note that all the ropes are on winches - none on bitts. This is of course the norm for all new ships built today, and simplifies mooring operations greatly.
All the ropes were 'Steelites', that meaning they were essent

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,639 Posts
Interesting photo Jim,

All the tankers that I sailed on were motor ships, but they had steam winches forward and aft.

Cheers Frank
 

·
ex-Denholm Moderator
Joined
·
11,591 Posts
Very interesting indeed Jim.
Thanks for keeping us up to date with current practices. (Applause)

I presume the winches are all self-tensioning?
 

·
Malim Sahib Moderator
Joined
·
8,606 Posts
Thanks for the comments Gents.

Ray: From what I remember they weren't, or at least it was never switched on if it was fitted. We did however have a computer in the Cargo Control Room which told us how much tension was on each line. We didn't use that either, much preferred the use of the Mk 1 eyeball and a well placed kick!
 

·
ex-Denholm Moderator
Joined
·
11,591 Posts
Yes, I tend to agree with you Jim.
Automated systems are excellent when they are working but can be a nightmare when they become a bit "iffy!" (Thumb)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,606 Posts
Great series of pictures Jim and what wonderfully lucid explanations to go with them. I expect to learn something when I log on to SN but these posts are exceptional even by this site's standards. Well done and sincere thanks.
Regards,
Alastair
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,873 Posts
I think you may be mistaken regarding the emergency towing arrangement. The arrangement shown here on the stern of the vessel is for towing another vessel, not for this vessel to be towed by another. The procedure is generally stated, but the buoy and line is picked up by the vessel in distress and led to one of the bow chain stoppers usually used for mooring to an SPM. The towing vessel can then theoretically tow the disabled vessel to safety.
 

·
Malim Sahib Moderator
Joined
·
8,606 Posts
Orbitaman,
I'm not mistaken, it's the same fit on all BP tankers and has been for circa 10 years.
You may be mistaking the system for one that is suitable for long term towage - it isn't, there was a separate chain stopper up at the bow with its on lead for that.
As I mentioned in the description, this system is purely for Emergency towing, i.e. being towed away from danger, the theory being that you'll always end up head first when aground/in collision.
For anything more long term then a chain would be passed to the fo'c'sle.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,912 Posts
Very interested to read about modern practices but I see that the old tradition of Chief Mate forward and Second Mate aft still seems to stand? In my time, over 30 years ago, the Third Mate was usually on the bridge for entering/leaving port. Wonder how that all started because I thought then that it would have been a good idea to have the C/O on the bridge understudying the Master.
 

Media information

Category
Tankers
Added by
James_C
Date added
View count
1,067
Comment count
17
Rating
0.00 star(s) 0 ratings

Share this media

Top