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Brocklebank's SS Masirah 11

Brocklebank's SS Masirah 11

Built in 1957 and sister to the later Mangla. The history of them both is very similar as they were laid up in the River Fal together and then sold to Greece at the same time.
In 1974 Masirah ran aground, while on voyage from Hamburg to Yokohama, in the San Bernadino Strait, Philippines. She was ref

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Stuart sorry to disagree with you but the Masirah and Mangla were not sister ships. The Masirah had 3 Scotch boilers with steam alternators, more like the Maskeliya and Maturata. The Mangla had two Foster Wheeler boilers and diesel alternators for port use and a turbo alternator for sea use. Had the pleasure of sailing on both.
Cheers.
Bob.
 

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Mangla certainly had Foster Wheeler Boilers . I also sailed HT on Masirah but cant honestly remember if she had Scotch or Water Tube ?? Matra had Scotch and I note Matra and Masirah had Officila numbers which were very close so perhaps they were sister ships ???
 

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Derek I was on the Masirah on her maiden voyage and I can assure you she had Scotch boilers. From the Maskeliya on all the ship were AC, and truth be told the Masirah didn\'t have a sister ship. Maskeliya and Maturata were sisters and had three Scotch boilers, Makrana and Mawana were sisters and had one Foster Wheeler and two Scotch boilers, Mangla and Mathura were sisters and had two Foster Wheeler boilers and a Cochrane donkey boiler. As stated in my previous memo Masirah was more like the Maskeliya and Maturata only larger and all life boats on the one deck. Sorry to ramble on, but as stated earlier had the pleasure of sailing on Maskeliya, Masirah and Mangla. I sailed on quite a few of the older ones as well with good times and not so good times.
Cheers.
Bob.
 

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Mawana and Makrana were 220v DC ships, I imagine Masirah was the same. Maskeliya & Maturata were definitely 110 AC - @60cs, my 50 cs record player suffered there. On Mawana Makrana my 110v DC converter needed 5 cargo cluster bulbs in series to drop the DC volts. Then we had music again.
 

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hi guys

The Masirah was the first of the class that included Mangla, Mawana, Makrana and Mathura. The basic design, diamensions and layout remained consistant thoughout the class but modificatioins were made as the class evolved.

Masirah did have a different boiler arrangement as mentiioned above and I suspect there were other changes in the ER layout as a result.

Externally there was one difference between Masirah and her sisters, Masirah had her funnel was located on the boat deck where as the with others it was located on the bridge deck, the Old Mans house being carried aft to the Veranda cafe. This made her the better looking of the bunch in my view as the funnel banding was more balanced, the top black being larger than the blue and white. I could be biased of course.

I recall that there was a story that Masirah was fitted with the wrong turbines. they should hve gone to a Ben boat. I never did find out if there was any truth in the story. She was about a knot slower than her sisters.

Masirah had steam winches and wooden hatch covers except No 1 which was a steel lid. I believe later class members had MacGregors. Tonnages varied slightly with Masirah having the larger dwt.

Maturata and Maskeliya were significantly smaller than the Masirah class and clearly different, outwardly as well as in the machinery arrangements one deck as well as below. Haveing said that there is an obvious progression from Maipura through to the Masirah which were the final out working of that composite superstructure concept. There after design changes were more radical.

Best Regards

Michael Meredith
 

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Hi again, guess the memory is not as good as I though. Thanks for the correction re Masirahs electrics, it was 220VDC, I had assumed the electrics on the Mawana, Makrana as I had never sailed on them. During trials on the Masirah she didn't develop her design HP and it was suspected that the wrong type of blading was installed in the HP turbine. During the maiden voyage we were taking torsion and thrust loading readings on instruments installed by Shipbuilding Research and Pametrada. If my memory is correct we lifted the cover on the HP turbine in Calcutta to inspect the blading. (I was on three ships that opened up turbines in Calcutta for one reason or another, so I may have this wrong.) To get design HP when loaded the byepass valve had to be opened just about a full turn, the fuel consumption increased approx 30%. I never heard if the blading was wrong as I left the Masirah when she got back to the UK as we were having our first child.
Cheers.
Bob Frizzell.
 

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Regarding Turbines I only once saw the internals ! That was Maipura in Calcutta in 1965 . Pat Morris was Chief and I only saw him in the engine room 3 times all trip ! One ocassion was to inspect the turbine blades . He told us apprentices ( Myself and Martin Clarke from Larne ) " Take a good look ! You wont see the internals of a turbine very often ! " )
He was very right ( I wish I could say the same about Diesels ! I seemed to live in the crankcase or scavenge spaces !! on the motor ships )
Maipura was the only dc ship I sailed on in Brocks . Harry Alison was the Electrician and had absolutley nothing to do !!! He had a " Batty Wahllah " change the light bulbs . Harry would go throught the motions of opening the cover of the pump starters now and again ; give a glance inside and close up again !
All steam winches ; an electricians paradise .
He and the Batty Wahlla spent a lot of time saving the brass fittings of the old light bulbs to sell at Suez or Calcutta for some beer money .

Oh Happy Days !
 

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Hi Masirah,
"They have eyes and they see not!" What an interesting set odf differetials you have outlined. I spent the best part of 2 years on Masirah, Mangla and Mathura and never noticed the different funnel sitings.
Stan
 

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