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Cheynes IV

Cheynes IV

Late Names Launched as W. Fernhead
Renamed as Wilfrid Fernhead

Length Overall 149.1 feet (45.44 metres)

Breadth extreme 29 feet and 8 inches (9 metres)

Draught Summer 17 Feet (5.1 metres)

Gross registered tonnage 530

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Thanks for the comment Ken. The old whaling station is at Albany, Western Australia. I was on a ship that collected a cargo of whale oil from there around 1970. While on a motoring holiday in WA in 2004 I visited the place which is now a tourist attraction. While the photo was taken by me I’ve added technical information copied from the Whale World website. The place is certainly worth a visit if you’re in the area. From the whaleworld.org web site.
The steam powered whaler Cheynes IV was built in 1948 by Framnaes Mek Vaerksted A/S (Shipyard), Sandefjord, Norway, Yard No 140. She was built for the Union Whaling Co. Ltd, Durban South Africa and paid off in 1967. Launched as W. Fearnhead, and was later renamed Wilfrid Fearnhead.
In 1969, she was purchased by Cheynes Beach Whaling Company Pty Ltd. Albany in Western Australia to replace the worn out Gascoyne, a German built veteran launched in 1936 and operated by the company since 1966.
She was sailed to Fremantle from South Africa by a crew of the Cheynes Beach Whaling Company employees, a trip which took seventeen days and arrived in Fremantle in March 1970. She was re-named Cheynes IV and after passing all State Maritime requirements, hunted whales for the Cheynes Beach Whaling Company from March 14th 1970 until its closure on November 21st 1978.
The Cheynes IV was laid up (in the care of Axel Christensen) a former skipper, at the Albany Town Jetty until she was towed to her present location by the Albany Port Authority tug M V Avon on September 2nd, 1981.
 

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Bob When I was with Harrisons Clyde I visited Albany quite a few times when the whaling was still in operation. I went on board one of the Cheynes I think it was the IV age thing forgetting the numbers. Having a day off due I went out with her the next day and had a really wonderful day from a very friendly crew. Great day and we did not catch any whales despite chasing them down only to have the skipper/gunner judge them to small. They used an aircraft to search for the whales and they passed information to the boats. Lovely photo, is it taken beside the old whale factory?

Don
 

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Thanks for the info Bob, very interesting. Doubt if i'll ever get to Albany though to see her!
Regards, Ken.
 

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She may have been propelled by a Fredrikstad double compound steam motor, these engines had uniflow LP cylinders; there were quite a lot of advanced steam reciprocating engines being built during the 1950', from other works such as Christianson & Meyer, Rankine Blackmore had a license to build Fredrikstad steam motors and the "Coulgarve", managed by Lambert Brothers was fitted with one.

Tom.
 

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Hi. Just out of interest go to. http://aso.gov.au/titles/do***entaries/ship-shouldnt-have/clip1/ If you can get the full doco it is a good watch. It is about the Cheynes 2 on an expedition to heard island. It started in Hobart then Albany then Kergulen to Heard is, back to Albany in tow of Saxon Onward. The Saxons were bought to WA to replace the whaling, they weren't successful however the Saxon Onward &Progress are still operating out of Hobart &Portland.
Regards Robin
 

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