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Failed flexible coupling

Failed flexible coupling

Failed starboard main engine coupling, Stirling Islay, Feb 2002.
For Fairfield, this was why the Islay's sea trials were abandoned and we headed back up the river to Govan.

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For the benefit of the ignorant (i.e. me!) can you confirm what is missing - my guess would be a very large rubbery thing in the gap that acts as a kind of shock absorber but I might be barking on this one.

Regards,

Brian
 

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For the benefit of another ignoramus, what is the purpose of this flexible coupling? Is it to cope with variations in shaft alignment due to different loading states?

Last year I took part in an interesting thread in this section of the gallery, prompted by my querying an illustration of a cargo steamer in which the shaft appeared to slope upwards from the main engine towards the propellor, and it was clear that the height of plummer blocks varied accordingly. It was explained that varying conditions of hog and sag occur depending on loading conditions, and the issue was more or less resolved.
Being a curious old architect (not naval!)I still wonder about these things!

Are flexible couplings such as this one used to deal with the propensity of shafts to become misaligned, with consequent overheating etc? I don't want to go over old ground, but I'd be interested to know more about this example.
 

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This photo shows the engine half of the coupling, the shaft end half has been removed. The two halfs are "glued" together under pressure. In this case the adheshion process failed. You can see the spots of rubber ripped from this half. The glue is supposed to be uniformly distibuted over each surface.
 

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