Ships Nostalgia banner
Favell

Favell

The Favell was the last sailing vessel built at Bristol, she was a 1,365 ton steel Barque operated by Charles Hill & sons untill she was sold to owners in Finland were she was used as a training ship for 40 years.

Does anybody have any more information about her?

Frank

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,091 Posts
Largely quoting A. A. Hurst: Somewhat unusually, she was built under a shed and launched bow first by Hill's of Bristol in 1895. They had built the vessel on speculation, and since there were no buyers at the time, they ran her on their own account for a couple of years, at the end of which they sold her to to J. W. Soederlund of Raumo. Of 1362 grt. on a length of 237.5', she was the last square rigger to be built or owned in Bristol, and she owed her peculiar name, which she always retained, to the christian name of Miss Hill, a daughter of the owner, who later became Lady Milnes and gave her name to several books. After ten years, Soederlund had sold the barque to Gunnar Rydmann of Helsingfors - the Finska Rederi Aktiebolaget - which later became the F.Å.A. (the Finnish Schoolship Association). She was from then on a sail-training ship, mainly in the Australian grain trade.
In 1933 she was in a collision with a steamer in the channel. (The steamer - Astoria of Glasgow - accepted responsibility) She had to put into Falmouth for repairs, and after sailing home was broken up near Viborg. Stein
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,975 Posts
Frank
Please find

Favell
A steel barque built in 1895 by Charles Hill & Sons, Bristol. Dimensions 237'5"×36'2"×21'3" and tonnage 1334 GRT and 1106 NRT.
1895
Launched at the shipyard of Charles Hill & Sons, Bristol, for their own account. Assigned the official British Reg. No. _____ and signal ____.
1897
Sold to Raumo Nya Skeppsrederi (J. Söderlund), Raumo, Finland.
1907
Sold to Finska Rederi AB (Lars Krogius), Helsingfors.
1911
Company re-organised as the Finska Skolskeppsrederiet.
1929-
In command of Captain Sten Lille.
1934 November
Sold to Wärtsilä to be broken up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,091 Posts
Hi Frank. The buntlines in the old wooden ships and on the schoolships I know well, were and are of rope. Diligently nipped, that is lightly fastened at the top of the sail, so that the larger weight of the rope going down to deck does not tighten it across the sail, chafe would be minimal. For safety and for economy the later steel ships used wire buntlines. As those who have tried to make a neat coil out of old wire know; to keep wire straight and thus off the sail is impossible, wherefore different methods of strenghtening the buntline cloths were tried out. I am reasonably sure this is what you see here. Stein
 

Media information

Category
Sailing Ships
Added by
Frank P
Date added
View count
387
Comment count
4
Rating
0.00 star(s) 0 ratings

Share this media

Top