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Floors

Floors

American shipbuilding terms 1918:
A, bounding angle bar. B, bolting up. C, holes for pipe flange for pump connections.

There's a number of small barrels in the foreground, what would these be containing?

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This whole series looks like an attempt to familiarize new employees with ship terms common in yards, the plaque in the foreground clearly identifies the ship as part of the emergency fleet program during WWI.
The barrels may contains rivets ready to be heated. just off the right from center of pic there is what looks like a portable rivet stove
 

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Yes, I did consider rivets, but then I thought: in a wooden barrel? Difficult to carry? When looking at the forepeak bulkhead in the foreground it is looks to me like bolts and nuts were heavily used besides rivets. Although rivets are seen on the skin plates, it seems to me that on the floors only bolts are in sight... And I ask: did you grease the nuts? You would if they were only temporary... But of course you wouldn't need lots of barrels of grease.
I am not certain that it is bolts I see. And I am not denying the possibility that the wooden barrels contain rivets, it just doesn't seem a natural place for them to me. Stein.
 

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Until very recently bolts, rivets and nails were shipped in these exact barrels in the US, which in this case are actually called kegs (just like beer), they roll and of course you can lift them with a sling.
Also note their sturdy construction.
Grease would have been in tin cans (5 gallon buckets/pails)
 

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