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Frisco Rig

Frisco Rig

Plan of Frisco rig, found at a US Navy website, and taken from a wartime training manual
Its not quite the way I remember it, maybe this is a USN variant

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Another good one Pat. We used this quite often in Aussie with BSL dont know if legal nowadays. I look forward to the next one.
 

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Thought that with all four derricks in use, as union purchase, it was called a Yo-Yo,
Frisco rig to me means the out board derrick plimbed over the side, out of the way. The inboard derrick was then rigged similar to Union purchase with a block on the shed ashore,basically union purchase but with the shed being the other derrick.
Could be wrong its over thirty years since I played with any sticks.

Enri
 

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The drawing shows Frisco rig more or less as I remember it. Rig to a block ashore was just called a 'house block' in my memory.
I may do better by tomorrow, but Frisco and Yo Yo could be the same thing.
 

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If the yo-yo and Frisco are the same thing, then what am I thinking of? I have never heard of the rig/term house Block.
Is there such a thing as a California? If there is, maybe I'm getting mixed up between the two.
Enri
 

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Yo Yo was when a running block was used with short wire pennants attached to the cargo hooks but needed 4 winches to operate The pennants were normally about 12' long
 

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Whatever it is called, and I've heard yo yo gear and frisco gear applied to the same rig, I thought it was not particularly useful, and preferred a ten ton rig with steam guys. once it was rigged, it could be operated just as efficiently as the frisco rig, and could plumb anywhere in the hatch and on the stage end, easily.
Pat
 

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The warehouses in all American ports used to have a gantry for their full length. Cargo blocks with runners ready reeved were attached at the top of the gantry.
You ran the runner off your yardarm derrick winch, put the derrick out of the way, and ran the house wire on to the winch, with the other end connected to the monkeys face of the union purchase.
Most of the sheds had an upper balcony, so using this house block you discharged union purchase direct to the shed upper level - or loaded for that matter, though I don't remember ever doing that.
If you look at any of the old pictures of American ports, or even modern pictures of old warehouses on this website, you will still see the gantries.
 

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Montreal was a good example of that way of working as mentioned by Muldonaich.

Trader.
 

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Pat Kennedy
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