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Hardwicke Grange

Hardwicke Grange

On Argentine meat run. 10,500 Tons.
Built !921.Torpedoed, Shelled and sunk North of Puerto Rico,1942.


My cards.

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Houlder's owned two ships called Hardwick Grange. The ship on your postcard was built by Wm Hamilton in 1921. Despite the caption on the card, my sources indicate that she was a ship of 9,005 tons. She was sunk by U129 on 12 June 1942.
The second Hardwick Grange was built by Hawthorn Leslie in 1960, during the time I was working for the company.

Fred
 

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Many thanks Fred. For the info, I lost the bits I had way back in the 50s.
 

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Of course you are both correct, this Hardwicke Grange was 9,005 Gross and 10,500 Deadweight. If one is that keen, she was also 5,628 Net. (Jester)

She was sunk in 25.45N - 65.45W whilst en route from New York to the River Plate, and whilst still tragic, mercifully only three of the crew were lost.
 

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t
Of course you are both correct, this Hardwicke Grange was 9,005 Gross and 10,500 Deadweight. If one is that keen, she was also 5,628 Net
I'm sure you're right, but if as I always thought the deadweight is the difference between a ship loaded down to the Plimsoll line and light ship then can the deadweight be more than the gross weight? Guess this has something to do with different meanings of gross registered tons and gross tonnage Would appreciate a short explanation
thanks
tony lear
tony lear
 

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Tony,

I will probably regret this, but let me have a go...

Deadweight is a measurement of weight and expressed in long tons or in metric tons – it usually abbreviated as DWT for deadweight tonnes or tons. It is the displacement at any loaded condition, minus the Lightship weight*. It includes the crew, passengers, cargo, fuel, water, and stores. Like Displacement, it is often expressed in long tons or in metric tons

* Lightship measures the actual weight of the ship with no fuel, passengers, cargo, water, etc. on board; i.e. what it actually weighs in terms of steel and other materials and hence the figure one looks at if you buy a ship for scrap.


Gross Register Tonnage (GRT) represented (i.e. past tense, as it has now been replaced by Gross Tonnage) the total internal volume of a vessel, with some exemptions for non-productive spaces such as crew quarters; 1 gross register ton is equal to a volume of 100 cubic feet (2.83 m³). This calculation is complex; a hold can, for instance, be assessed for grain (accounting for all the air space in the hold) or for bales (exempting the spaces between structural frames). Gross register tonnage was replaced by gross tonnage in 1994 under the Tonnage Measurement convention of 1969.

Gross Tonnage (GT) refers to the volume of all ship's enclosed spaces (from keel to funnel) measured to the outside of the hull framing. It is always larger than gross register tonnage, though by how much depends on the vessel design. . It was a measurement of the enclosed spaces within a ship expressed in "tons" – a unit which was actually equivalent to 100 cubic feet.
Tonnage measurements are now governed by an IMO Convention (International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships, 1969 (London-Rules)), which applies to all ships built after July 1982. In accordance with the Convention, the correct term to use now is GT, which is a function of the moulded volume of all enclosed spaces of the ship.

GT is consequently a measure of the overall size of the ship, not its weight, and this maybe where the confusion arises.
 

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