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HMS King George V

HMS King George V

HMS King George V inbound at Meaghers Beach, Halifax ,Nova Scotia date uncertain,probably 1941. See comments below.

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A good image of KGV, but it is far earlier than 1944, if you look closely at the top of B turret you can see a box type structure at an angle, this is the cassette launcher for a UP mounting, she had four, one on B two on X turret and a further one right aft on the quarter deck.
These AA weapons were fitted from new, she was commissioned in October 1940, they were removed in 1941 probably after the encounter with the Bismarck in May 1941, these awful weapons were thought to have been a contributary factor in the Loss of the Hood which also carried them, they are thought to have contrributed to the fire aft which lit the ship up making her a better target.
The UP mounting or Unrotated Projectile was the brain child of a chap called Alwyn Crow and fired twenty 7" three-foot long rockets to a height of about 1000 feet, here the rocket ejected a small parachute mine and trailing wires , the idea being a an attacking plane woulf fly into the wires and pulled the parachute mine into itself and thus blow itself up, propelled by unstable and highly inflammable solid fuel these weapons were more dangerous to the carrier than the target and to make matters worse the reloads were stowed on deck as they were so risky to carry.
So back to the picture as she is a bit tatty this is not a new ship but a few months old in 1941 possibly just after the Bismarck sinking and will be at Scapa Flow, note that abreast A gun she has two derricks ready for loading munitions.

The KGV class althought slightly under-gunned with 14" weapons ( Mk1 14" C45) firing a shell weighing a tad under 1500 lbs were fine and very well armoured ships, there chief problem was the two quadruple 14" turrets, the twin turret seldome gave any trouble but the quadruple had in excess of 3,000 working parts and over 50 safety interlocks, during the Bismarck sinking she had frequent stoppages of both the quadruple turrets - at very best they worked at 80% efficiency at worst far less, because of this she inflicted far less damage than the Rodney, herself beset by reliablity problems, although to a lesser extent than KGV, in her triple 16" turrets ( just over 2,000lb shell).
Steve
 

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Hi Steve: Thanks for that. Yes, the Unrotated Projectile was junk,I believe only Winston thought it was worthwhile,another hairbrained scheme! That is great sleuthing,will correct date(s).Ammunition for these and other escorting BB was available at Halifax (Bedford Mag. which had bad explosion 1945).Believe this photo taken at Mc Nab's Island where the gate existed for Halifax Harbour. Cheers,Ken
 

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An Atlantic crossing at speed would certainly explain the paintwork Ken
Compare this image with later shots and there is little deck space anywhere due to additional AA weapons, the only place left uncluttered was the bow which was just to wet for anything.
The low bow designed stemmed from a silly idea that the guns should be able to fire right ahead at close in targets ( low gun elevation) this was silly in three ways, you have secondary guns for close in targets, firing you main guns right ahead at low elevation damaged the foredeck due to blast from the guns, It made the ship very wet in a seaway, this wetness had a serious effect on the main guns of A and it also cuased flooding of the ammunition handling spaces via the ventilation system, Vanguard, based of the KGV hull, was a far better seaboat due to her higher bow, all she really needed to make her a good battleship was a modern gun.
 

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