Ships Nostalgia banner
Loading Loco

Loading Loco

Loading a locomotive on Komata, Hamilton berth, Brisbane. Loaded two, note the plastic on the locos. After a couple of days going backwards the plastic had gone with the wind

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,606 Posts
Great picture, excuse my ignorance as an ex tanker bloke, but what did you sit the locos on? Did you have rails laid on deck?
Regards,
Alastair
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
Great shot Jim........good to see you had the cargo net ready "just in case"
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
48 Posts
Alastair,
It can be done either way, but being a dry cargo ship, there is no real harm in welding temporary track on to the main deck (OK some will complain about burnt paint, but these things can be put right for a cost). The alterantive is a wooden bed, which is troublesome to build and not as good.
Regards
Mark
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3 Posts
Some of these same locomotives were shipped back to Australia (Adelaide, I think) in 1977 by UNION MELBOURNE, a RO/RO ship, to be rebuilt. They too were lifted on board by crane at Wellington onto the top deck and unloaded by container crane in Australia. The bogies were removed and they sat on a wooden bed on the deck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,606 Posts
Gentlemen, thank you both for improving my education; it's much appreciated. So, if you use a wooden bed then the practice is to remove the bogies first which must make building the bed less complicated. I'm sure when I sat my tickets I would have had to have known the answer but, when you've never seen it done for real, you wonder if theory and practice match up. I can recall memorising great chunks of Messers Kemp & Young's "Cargo Work" for the exams but it was all just "stuff you had to know" to me.
Regards,
Alastair
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Alastair,
A bit like "shifting boards" & "dunnage". etc., - terms you had to know all about for your Second Mate's ticket but, being a tanker man, had never experienced.
Welcome back - you've obviously been cruising in the Meddy on your yacht again - its been quiet without you & no bones of contention, either!
Kind regards,
John.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,606 Posts
John, yes just like shifting boards, dunnage etc. all rather mysterious to us tanker men, even when learned by rote! The only bits I can remember relating to were the explosive hazards of coal dust and bulk grain. Don't know about cruising the Med. but I have been wizzing round the shores of Lemnos on my part owned 6.5m boat with it's 30 hp 4 stroke Yamaha! As she can plane and has central remote steering she has been great fun, back again in September for another 2 weeks. Sorry about the lack of contention thus far, I will try harder! I have to say the one thing I missed in Greece and with my sister in Provence was this site although both my sibling and her French husband are baffled by it's addictive qualities, weird folk the French. Busy time in France doing electrics with remote controled switching etc. My sister likes toys so there is some family likeness to be seen. My brother in law is a retired accountant and mutters over the power consumption of my radio controlled lighting circuits. No soul but a great chef!
Regards,
Alastair
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
The locos sat on a wooden bad and welded to the deck. I cannot remember whether they had the bogies removed or not. I will have to find another photo of mine to see it they were in place. The bed was on the ship for three trips. The locos were removed by the floating crane.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
This shot was taken on the first trip with locos. This thrip we ran into some very bad weather resulting with us with all most full power, going backwards. We were going backwards when the Kaitawa foundered some 300 miles ahead of us. The sea looked like it was in a washing machine. Tricky time chucking the stearing gear, comming over the beds and the seas coming over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,606 Posts
Jim, that first trip sounds a bit scarey, I shudder to think of the effect had one or both of the locomotives broken free of their deck stowage. Clearly the wooden beds were well made and secured but it must have been an anxious time for you all. I've experienced the "going backwards" thing myself, the first time on my first ship "British Cormorant". 24 hour run, total nautical miles achieved = -38. That messed up the chief's bunkers consumed figures and the log abstract!
Regards,
Alastair
 

Media information

Category
Cargo vessels
Added by
J Boyde
Date added
View count
469
Comment count
12
Rating
0.00 star(s) 0 ratings

Share this media

Top