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Ocean liners fill New York's Piers in this view from February, 1939. This picture was taken shortly after this shot that is looking upriver: (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/314519/title/new-york-harbor-2c-february-2c-1939/cat/all). In this particular image, you can actua

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Looks like Columbus on the opposite side of the pier from Bremen. Not sure about the smaller French liner opposite Normandie. Nice to see a shot that's not one of the same few seen over and over.
 

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Do the warehouse doors open by lifting vertically ? If so then the steel frames could be the door guides ? Been tied up alongside these warehouses years ago but cant remember how the doors opened !
 

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Bremen was built with much shorter funnels, but they needed to be heightened by 15 feet to try to keep soot of the decks. Not very successfully, because her sister Europa, which survived the war and became French Line's Liberte had her funnels heightened again.

I suggest that the liner on the other side of Normandie's pier is De Grasse and the liner on the other side of the dock is White Star's Britannic.
 

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Hi James, you're correct, the framework was there because there was virtually no pier apron to land cargo on, and the frame allowed the lifting gear to drop down in front of, and then be pulled inside, the cargo openings of the pier shed itself. There was a close-up picture of the Mauretania using this set up, it was posted about three years ago as seen here: http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/318804/title/mauretania/cat/all

Clyde (cunard61)
 

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I saw this rig in San Francisco as well and it made a lot of sense because you only needed one derrick to plumb the hatch, the yardarm derrick was topped right up out of the way. Ive seen it used with yo-yo gear (Frisco rig)as well.
 

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Hi Pat, I noticed too that since there was no pier apron, the yardarm derrick couldn't reach the cargo opening of the pier because of the natural tapering of a ship's bow, and they needed a direct drop in front of each pier's cargo opening. That upper framework allowed for that kind of direct drop for both the pier opening and the cargo hatch. I'm guessing the builders of these piers had to adopt this set-up because pier space in New York was at a premium and any added apron to both sides of each pier would obviously take away from that highly valuable space in which another pier could be added. I agree too, that this set-up made good sense as it seems like a very efficient system.

Clyde (cunard61)
 

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Thanks for the explanations, I can't remember ever see the frames being used.
As usual, somebody on SN knows the answer.
Clyde, regarding your question regarding the 3 blocks on the Mauritania, they seem to be suspended from the mast head. As you say, unusual.
Thanks again.
 

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