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Miss Gaunt

Miss Gaunt

In Gibraltar on the 26th December.

Daniel

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Miss Gaunt - Tug - ID Number: 7716957 - Built New Iberia, Louisiana, USA 1976 as Gauntlet - US Flag.
Gross Tonnage: 538 - Deadweight: 1109 - LOA: 39 Metres - Beam: 10 Metres.

Sold 2015 renamed Miss Gaunt.
Curaçao Flag.

Class: Registro Italiano Navale.

Owners: All Star Maritime Llc c/o Nordav AB, Ridderkerk, Netherlands.
Ship Managers: Nordav AB, Ridderkerk, Netherlands.

Regards
Keith
 

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This tug was what was called a "9" by Crowley Maritime. They had two 3600 HP 20 cylinder EMD diesels and huge triple rudders. I guess if they added up all the auxiliary engines they could come up with 9,000 HP which lead to the class designation. An excellent outside towing tug which was as noted originally named Gauntlet. The Gladiator, a sister tug, was in SF Bay for many years conducting ship assist. Crowley had a tradition of using outside tugs towing on the coast for many years before getting some more time in the bay before they were retired. Eventually the tug escort regulations for tankers lead to their retirement for ship assist and replacement by tractor tugs.
 

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I am always amused at some owners and how they re-name their acquired vessels by using part of the old name.
Does this owner have a family member named "Gaunt"? Is it a cheaper way to re-do***ent it or save a few bucks on welding on new raised letters? Don't mind me, it's just one of thosee odd observations I note.
I have seen it countless times in my years docking and sailing ships in various ports around the Nation. You can see the old name, usually in raised, welded on letters or numbers, then painted out and new letters or numbers painted over the old name.
I wish the new owner well, these "Invader" class tugs are incredible boats.
 

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Ahoy capnfan,

With reference to the names... agree, right up there with clever titles for hair cutting establishments, chip shops & brothels.

Those Crowley tugs had good reputations despite being 'old fashioned' in so many ways, not the least the accomodation.
 

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When these boats originally came out they had no sound insulation and the scream of the engines was hard to imagine. I was told that Tom Crowley (the second Tom whose son is now in charge) came down to Pier 3 in San Francisco and ordered insulation installed immediately. Crowley's subordinates were notorious for doing their best to save a buck at the companies employee's expense. I agree with Kits Buoy and capnfab that they are both incredibly fine tugs with abominable accommodation. Lots of power combined with amazing rudder power.
 

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Kits & Wally..

It was always my belief they (Nickum & Spaulding?) designed these class of tugs around the fuel tanks and engines.

Working around ships with these boats could be a real adventure too. But, I was given some very good advice by the mate I was relieving once. He said, "If you're changing bows or quarters, it helps to just leave one engine clutched in astern. You can overpower the backing engine with the ahead engine and those 3 rudders down there."
Man, was he spot on too! Those 16 second or longer delays in the clutches felt like a lifetime!
 

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