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Olympic

Olympic is show if in the floating dock at Southampton in the mid to late 1920’s. The view is unusual because it shows steam being vented from the ships forth funnel, which it seems would have been rare given that there was no boiler room beneath the stack. In other views of this ship, some member

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Hi Frank, no it's just the shadow of a small painters scaffold that's suspended from the top deck. It's kind of hard to make out in smaller views of the image.

Clyde (cunard61)
 

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No problem getting steam for the No. 4 funnel. Easy to run a steam line from No. 1 boiler. Note the steam exhaust pipes on forward and aft side of the funnel No. 4. That would likely for symmetry.
 

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Other photos of her show steam venting from fourth funnel. I suppose that in dock some electrical power would be required. The steam reciprocating dynamos were aft though supplied from auxiliary boilers forward.
 

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Eddy,
Not sure about the dynamos being used while in floating dock. They would have an auxiliary condenser and would need a supply of cooling water. Or the condensate was allowed to waste into the bilges or a well. Can't find any drawings of the dynamo room for these vessels. Might have been a shore power connection... like today.
 

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Every picture of a ship in the floating dry dock has smoke coming from at least one funnel. I think enough boilers had to remain in use to provide steam pressure either for electrical use or steam pressure for fire fighting equipment. I've never read, but have always gotten the impression, that full electrical power couldn't be obtained while a ship was in the floating dock.

Clyde (cunard61)
 

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Cunard61

Strange that you mention the lack of full electrical power being obtained whilst a ship was in the Southampton floating dock as I'm fairly certain that is the reason why at least one boiler was in use hence the steam from the funnel.

The Floating Dock didn't have full electrical power and the ship would have to supply enough power for support.

I was actually at berth 50 in the Port of Southampton today, the same berth that the former floating dock was attached to and I was imagining the sight of a liner in the floating dock ahead of me :)

Sean
 

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Found a bit of information from Ken Marschall in Ca and from 'The Shipbuilder - 1912'

1. The whistles on funnels on Nos 3 & 4 were for show only.
2. The flues from the boilers in Boiler Room No.1 run up to No. 3 funnel. Also the safety valves and pipe work run up to the aft side of No. 3 funnel.
3. Any smoke coming from No. 4 funnel is coming from the galley (oil fired) First Class Grill Restaurant. This is right under No. 4 funnel.
4. The exhaust pipes on the forward and after side of No. 4 funnel do show were working pipes, not just for show.

Sean and Clyde, Next question. Yes, you can get steam for running the dynamos coming from the boilers in No. Boiler Room. How do you get rid of the exhaust steam? There is a condenser but where do you get the cooling water from? Must be able to get rid of the steam.

The big floating dock must have it's own electrical power.... lights and for pumps to be able to flood the dock and also to raise it. If it does have it's own boiler then it must have had a means of connecting the electrical supply ashore.

Stephen
 

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More on Southampton Floating Dock:

The Southampton dock, built to this design by Armstrong, Whitworth for the Southern Railway, is the largest floating dock in the world. It has a lifting power of 60,000 tons. The length is 960 feet, the overall width 170 feet, the clear width inside 130 ft 6 in and the depth of the floor 20 feet. The draught over the keel blocks, with the top of the side walls 6 ft 6 in out of the water, is 38 feet.

The complete weight, including fittings and machinery, comes to about 19,000 tons. The total area of the floor is about 3½ acres. Some 3¼ million rivets have been put into the dock, and approximately 7½ million rivet holes have been either drilled or punched. The dock is in seven sections and each section is provided with its own pumping machinery. A centrifugal pump at the bottom of the dock, operated through vertical shafting by an electric motor situated in a house on the top deck, is installed on either side of each section, so that there are fourteen main pumps and as many motors.

The control of these various units is completely centralized. The valves and pumping motors are operated electrically by means of a push-button system in a single valve-house situated on top of one of the walls. Gauges record there the depth of water in the different compartments of the dock while flooding or pumping is taking place.

END

Shore power!
 

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Clyde,

Motor vessels must have shore power. Cannot use generators without cooling water. You can raise steam when a vessel in sitting in a dock but you can't get rid of the exhaust steam... without cooling water.

On the other side....

Perhaps you can use the dynamos if the exhaust steam can bypass the condensers and the exhaust is able to vent to atmosphere via up the pipes on the back of No. 4 funnel? I guess the seems the reason why so many photos show the smoke and steam from the ships in the dock?

Stephen
 

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