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OPEQUON

OPEQUON

OPEQUON

A T2 tanker built by the Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. in December 1943. The type T2-SE-A1 tanker was the most common type of wartime tanker to be built, there being 481 of them delivered between 1942 and 1945.
Power was provided by a Turbo-Electric drive. A steam turbine generator was connected to a propulsion motor which turned the propeller. This did away with the main reduction gear, thus saving manufacturing time and cutting costs. The ships were built at four main yards in Alabama, Oregon, California and Pennsylvania. The average time to build a T2 tanker was about 70 days, from keel laying to sea trials.
They were 523 feet 6 inches long, 68 feet abeam and carried a gross rated tonnage of 10,448.
The Turbo-Electric system delivered 6,000 shp and had a top speed of around 15 knots. They had 9 sets of tanks, with Nos. 2 to 9 having a main centre tank carrying 391,500 gallons and two side tanks carrying 165,000 gallons each. Tank No.1 consisted of only two side by side tanks divided by a common bulkhead. Total cargo was around 5,930,000 gallons.
A brief wartime snapshot of Opequon came between May 2nd and 12th 1944 when she was part of Convoy UC21 sailing from Liverpool to New York. She was one of 27 ships when, one day out from Liverpool, she lost steam for 18 minutes just after noon on May 3rd. On May 8th she developed condenser leaks and after using up all of her supply of saw dust to try and plug the leaks it was decided that she had little chance of reaching her destination. However, some favorable weather allowed 6 sacks of saw dust to be transferred by USS Kirkpatrick from another convoy ship Cerro Gordo. This extra supply was sufficient to stem the leaks and Opequon stayed with the convoy to New York.
Opequon was renamed World Trust in 1956 and World Charm in 1962 but by 1966 she was plying her trade as Florence.
She was broken up at Kaohsiung during February 1979. There are no examples of T2 tankers in existence.

Photograph belongs to Stuart Smith
Photographer unknown.

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The Florence was a frequent visitor to the Columbia River, carrying grain to her native Taiwan (Eddie SS Co). She was scrapped at Kaohsiung, February 1977. Long time in service.
 

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Thanks for the interesting stuff about the T2's

Redhead
 

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World Charm indicates a conversion to dry/bulk cargo by Niarchos.
 

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R651400, sold to Niarchos in 1956 and renamed World Trust, operated as a tanker until 1962 when she was lengthened, widened and converted to a bulk carrier, 12,839 grt. Renamed World Charm. Sold in 1966 and renamed Florence. She continued trading until 1979 when she was broken up at Kaohsiung in February.
Regards,
Alastair
 

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I have done some surveys on the old MARINE DUVAL and the MARINE FLORIDIAN. both ships had T-2 sterns welded onto sulphur carrier forebodies. I see where they have been scrapped.
 

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Tankers
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Stuart Smith
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