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Pleuger Rudder

Pleuger Rudder

C.S.Monarch showing pleuger rudder which gave extremely fine manouvring and steering capabilti

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I am impressed, it certainly looks the business, but I wonder why they have put the unit into an old fashioned plate rudder, instead of a balanced or semi balanced one.
I would have thought stern thrusters would have been easier to maintain.
 

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Used to have these on "Bowater" ships I sailed on in early 70's. apparenty for manoeuvring up the Welland canal /St Lawrence, however rarely worked as often smashed up when trapped in ice. Think this one shown a lot more robust than the old ones. Rgds, Richard
 

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"Bowater"?? Were they anything to do with "Bowater-Scott" the paper makers?
 

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Coastie,
Bowater's ships used to bring paper into the Bowaters Paper Mill at Ellesmere Port from Canada.
They were good ships and very highly thought of by the deck crowd. You needed a letter from the Holy Ghost to get a job in one of 'Bowie's'
regards,
Pat
 

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I have a poster of a 70's Rolls Royce with the reg number 1800 TU which was a demo poster and had the caption of something like "The best car in the world printed on the best paper in the world. Beaublade by Bowater-Scott." It's been a while since I have seen the poster.
 

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Some details here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleuger_rudder
 

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Iain, Prop is powered and could propel ship up to about 3knots.. Used for fine manoevring and station keeping on cable work. This rudder also had capability to be put over to 90 degres to give stern thrust effect.. safety interlock on rudder to prevent 90 degree operation with main engines... a clever piece of engineering.. effective but somewhat underpowered and superceded by more powerful directional stern thrusters.

Doug
 

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Re the Pleuger rudder on the Bowater ships:-
Pleuger rudders were fitted to the Bowater Steamship Company motor ships ALICE BOWATER; CONSTANCE BOWATER; ELIZABETH BOWATER; GLADYS BOWATER; NINA BOWATER and PHYLLIS BOWATER, all built between 1958 and 1961. The turbine driven steam ships were not fitted with a Plueger.
The Sulzer slow speed diesel main engine could not operate at a slower speed than four knots so the Pleuger was fitted for slower speeds in the St Lawrence Seaway. It also provided better maneuverability at slow speed when in the seaway and for making the 180 degree turn in the River Swale on the way to Ridham Dock. I remember docking against the tide at Sittingborne when the Pilot was giving “Dead Slow Head – Stop; Dead Slow Ahead – Stop” orders faster than the telegraph or engineers could provide them while the head ropes and after back spring were made fast. If the Pleuger had been working it would have done the job by adjusting the power. Much to the pilot’s dismay, when the last ‘Stop” was given the engine kept firing up and stopping, starting and stopping In response to a telephone call to stop the engine the Chief replied, “You ordered them so you are going to get them.”
It was an electric motor that drove the Pleuger propeller all fitted in the rudder and gave a speed of about three to four knots when at full speed, there being a variable speed control on it. If memory serves me I do not think it had an astern setting but I may be wrong on this. There was an alternator motor to change the power 220 DC from the generators to the AC power the Pleuger motor took. There being at least two generators on the board when the Pleuger was in use.
It worked well as long as the Master / Pilot remembered not to operate the main engine at the same time as the Pleuger was being driven, especially if the Pleuger was ahead and the main engine was astern. The Pleuger propeller did not like this and often lost its blades when it occurred. An interlock to prevent the main engine operating when the Pleuger was operating was fitted in the mid 1960s.

From The Motor Ship
The Pleuger active-rudder induction motor is rated at 150 h.p. It is designed for direct on-line starting and under this condition takes three times full load current. Crompton Parkinson Ltd. have supplied a motor alternator set to drive the rudder motor, comprising a light compound-wound 220-volts D.C. motor flexibly-coupled to a 3-phase. 50-cycles, 380-volts alternator - both machines being mounted on a common bedplate. The alternator has an output of 142 kW (190 kVA at 0.75 p.f.) at a full load speed of l,500 r.p.m. and although the inherent voltage regulation of the machine is good, an Isenthal voltage regulator has been supplied with the first equipment which gives regulation to plus and minus 2.5 percent full fold to no load.
Extract from an article on the ELIZABETH BOWATER, The Shipping World; August 13th, 1958

The vessel is fitted with a Pleuger active rudder motor particularly for use in the St. Lawrence Seaway and the river Swale. Experience has shown that, when using active rudder motor, manoeuvres in passing through the locks in the St. Lawrence are reduced by 80 per cent and a much safer passage is assured. In the NINA BOWATER, the motor is a water-cooled, three-phase A.C., submersible, squirrel-cage induction unit. The rating is 150 H.P. at 720 r.p.m. and it requires current at 380 volts, 50 cycles. The propeller has three blades and is made of aluminium bronze, and gives a thrust of about 4,000 lb.
Extract from an article on the NINA BOWATER in The Shipbuilder and Marine Engineer-Builder; December 1961, Page 670 to 676

I was a Bowater Cadet and spent most of my twelve years at sea on the bridge of the Bowater ships.
I presume the above would have been the same for the CS MONARCH.
The development of side thrusters in the 1960s would have changed the need for a Pleuger on ships like the MONARCH but the Dead Slow Ahead speed problem on the Bowater ships would be solved by the introduction of variable pitch propellers in the 1960s. Alas the Bowater ship’s days were number by the late 1960s.
I hope this is of interest to those who have not come across the Pleuger Rudder before.

Tom Kearsey
 

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