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Umbria

Umbria

Cunard's Umbria. Perhaps nearing her launch in 1884; I can't explain those heavy lines coming this way from her stern, what are they for now, with much scaffolding still in place?
If they didn't build ships of wood in Glasgow any longer, they still used a lot of wood. Umbria was scrapped in 1910.
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The heavy ropes may be attached to the drag chains used to slow her down during launch, Stein.

Cheers
Kris
 

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Hi Kris. Sounds plausible, if there's some distance to the water and they aim to put some on her port side too.
No propeller yet, but a lock for her rudder. I've read she was one of the last two Cunarders with a full sailing ship rig, but they may have put that in after her launch...
The picture is without much detail, but I liked the composition; the dark mood in it suits a picture from long ago: it looks very historical! Here's a page with her voyages, another xylograph with her full rig, and a coloured photograph without: http://www.norwayheritage.com/p_ship.asp?sh=umbri Regards, Stein.
 

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To quote from the "The Cunard Line and The World's Fair, Chicago, 1893" published by the Electrotype Company in 1893.

"Then came the 'Aurania', a little faster than the 'Servia'. But still perfection was not reached, and in 1884 the 'Umbria' and the 'Etruria', sister ships, were launched. They were, with the exception of the 'Great Eastern', the largest vessels afloat, and without any exception the most powereful - for size does not always represent power, as stout men are aware. They were each 500 feet in length, with a gross tonnage of 8,127 tons and ample accommodation for 550 first-class passengers and 800 emigrants. The engines indicated upwards of 14,500 horse-power, and the average speed was set down at 19½ knots per hour. In August and September, 1892, the 'Etruria' steamed from Queenstown to Sandy Hook, 2,787 miles, in six days and twenty two minutes and six days and twenty minutes respectively. In July, 1892, the 'Umbria' accomplished her eighty-second trip to New York in five days twenty-two hours and seven minutes. Her daily runs were as follows :- 461 knots, 502, 500, 427, 502 and 388; total 2,781 knots; average speed, 19.57 knots per hour.
These vessels represented the finest specimens of naval architecture and marine engineering produced up to that day......."
 

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Thanks Kris. That's good ad-text actually, even if dated. Moves well and makes you think here and there. ("as stout men are aware" - taken their beatings those fatsos have, from small scientific punchers?)
20 knots are not bad, must have been worth a drum salvo at the time. Regards, Stein
 

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Stein,
There is photo of her with the sailing rig.
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=69287
Cheers Frank
 

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