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Vinke deck

Vinke deck

Foredeck of a ship from Vinke and Co. Perhaps the Hilversum? Photo taken 1960 or earlier.
What sort of hatch cover is that in front? Is it a full breadth iron "lid"? I've had those, we called them "pontoons". But I don't get those uniform rows of "dots" across it. Can't be the canvas cover we are seeing, can it?

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Stein.

It's a MacGregor hatch, the dots are the crossjoint wedges, which seal one section against another.

The bull wire for opening it is also visible lying there.
 

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Thank you Mackenzie. I would have supposed all folding hatches to be flat. On the one ship with patent hatches I've been on, they were. And there were no wedges.
I've now searched the net for a useful link, and there were lots of sites dealing with the MacGregor products, but I found none with good illustrations. I suppose with those wedges (cramplike?) they dispensed with tarpaulins? Stein
 

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Stein,

I have posted a photo of the M/S Estrella (DBDS) and you can see the Macgregor hatch covers, the wedges had to be hit home with a large hammer.

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/10990/cat/510/si/estrella/perpage/24

Frank
 

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Hi Frank. Interesting combination altogether; the cranes, the hatches in a sideways row and those hatches. I see no wooden wedges at the coamings, and take that to mean that no tarpaulins were used. Regards, Stein.
 

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Hi Stein, there were no tarpaulins, on the Estrella the 2 small outer hatches were refrigerated (4 in total), and all the hatch covers were opened and closed with a wire, the covers were all joined by a length of chain and when they were closed they were held in position (water tight) with a short length of iron bar with a head that was flipped (Its difficult to explain the action) in to place, some ships had screwed rods to hold the covers down, all the hatch covers had a rubber seal.

Cheers Frank
 

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Thanks Kris. I see the owners are planning an encyclopedia here. We might soon consider the MacGregor hatch for an entry.
I notice a chain in your picture. From this I take that a "bull wire" were first taken to the hook of a rigged derrick, and when the separate parts were lifted slightly, the chain took over. The chain being connected to a wire that went round the winch drum I suppose?
We had folding hatches on a Lakes-ship I were on, the Topdalsfjord, but the parts were much larger, and anyway it's forty years ago, I don't remember much. Stein
 

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2 ships I was on had McGregor hatches, nice :)
Marika had steel hatches, she was built in 47 in Holland.
These were similar but different, wheels and gaskets were the same but no chains, so each part had to be lifted against the deck house and secured.
Sorry no pic, the only picture Ruud found has the ship converted back (!)
to wood and canvas with all derricks and deckhouse removed.
McGregor sure made life a lot easier compared to wooden covers!
I recall the older style with bolts to secure the hatch and later the "camlock"
rods which were captive and very fast.
Hatch covers with all the different styles out there are about a subject unto themselves...
 

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They were all hard work personally I liked boards and canvas because most of the time you were level with the hatch where as with McGregors you were doubled over hammering in the crossjoint wedeges.
 

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