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Brian Clark Springhall 18th May 2014 20:11

Quote:

Originally Posted by Engine Serang (Post 850865)
Hi Folk,

Very sorry to hear about John Bannister, I never sailed with him but lodged with him in the Mission in Hull about 1979. he was studying for his Seconds.
as a 2/E or 3/E on the small Russians it was always a relief when Rupert and his gang came on board in Kuwait to do a unit or whatever to allow the ships engineers to patch up the bloody generators or the "Hideous Hagglands" hydraulic cranes. BTW has anybody else nightmares still about the Hagglunds boiling in the heat of Abadan or Khorramashar?
am I correct in thinking that Peter Porters son was an Engine Cadet in 1980? I think I sailed with him on the Ibn Abdoun or Hyaan.
weather rubbish here in Dublin
Hem de la la.

Can't ever remember Ruperts rangers pulling a unit wouldn't have felt safe if they had done one on any ship I sailed on. However they did do a good service on re stelliting the exhaust valves and any small bits of machining that may have been required.
Yes the Russian Hagglunds were a trial at times, I remember swapping a unit from one crane and putting it in the opposite crane to enable cargo to be worked until we could look at it with the pressure off. The generators were always a problem in carrying load
and the height of the generator flat deckhead didn't help when doing an overhaul. I always thought that the Turbo Blower should have had an intercooler.
Cant remember Peter Porter having a son, he did have a daughter to Dianne I think his wife was called, but left them both in Kuwait when he disappeared.

AlbieR 18th May 2014 20:37

Haggalunds cranes, working on a plank stuck across the jibs covered in oil over an open hatch and tween deck to get into the sump. Where was the safety culture then. I had many a row with the mates to get a hatch closed before I would look at the crane. Mind you sometimes shot myself in the foot because after fixing the crane then had to turn to again because they couldn't open the hatch, happy days.

AlbieR

Engine Serang 20th May 2014 14:09

Happy days indeed; when certificated officers were expected to have a titter of wit and run a department with common sense on sound engineering principles.
But wait, can you imagine a Port State control Inspector coming onboard in Liverpool and seeing the thinnest engineer being lowered through the exhaust valve space to gauge a liner. How would he view the donkeyman flashing up the russian water tube boiler with a rag on the end of a steel poker? How many engineers could explain to him the labels on the switchboard in cyrillic script? although we could all put a second generator on the board.

Nevertheless we took pride on keeping the show on the road.

AlbieR 20th May 2014 15:06

Post #253 "How many engineers could explain to him the labels on the switchboard in cyrillic script? although we could all put a second generator on the board."

I took the Solaibiah out new and as you say struggled with Russian labels, valve tags etc, until one day Gregorie the Guarantee lecky said " I like you so I will show you something". He screwed a label off the switchboard turned it round and it had the English equivilent on the back, same with the valve tags! . And this was after a couple of years struggling on Jabariah, Mansouriah, and all the others.

Engine Serang 20th May 2014 15:49

An extract from my watchkeeping notebook, Al Aridhiah 1975.

Emergency Generator Russian Class.
Normal position of switches are:

Hand operated circuit breaker A.C.I. in UP position
Switch B.K. to ON position
Switch 2NN to ON position
Switch N.P.H. to AUTO position.


It worked although I think the "N"'s were back to front.

I was back on the Aridhiah in December 1979 and the Russian labels were on the switchboard. Today the ISM would regard that as Familiarisation!

God I loved the K-Class.

baileysan 21st May 2014 22:12

Hi Brian
Peter had two daughters , no sons. They live close to Peter's ex wife in the South. Have not heard of Paul for a good while, he seems to have gone missing from this site.
The name Hagglunds brings back some memories, usually bad. However I did get involved with original Hagglunds and they were pretty trouble free.
Seeing Fiak tomorrow will pass on your regards.

lordy 22nd May 2014 13:45

baileysan
 
Hi Tom
Lost contact with Fiak after I left Aberdeenplease give him my regards
and let him know I'm alive and kicking in Spain
Rgds
John

baileysan 24th May 2014 18:13

John
Fiak could not make it Thursday but will pass on your regards next time. He still does some work on a cable stowage barge, sounds quite a nice number.
Hope your keeping well.

lordy 24th May 2014 18:46

baileysan
 
Thanks Tom appreciate you passing the the message,
still alive and well
Best rgds
John

Brian Clark Springhall 25th June 2014 10:59

Quote:

Originally Posted by baileysan (Post 868066)
Hi Brian
Peter had two daughters , no sons. They live close to Peter's ex wife in the South. Have not heard of Paul for a good while, he seems to have gone missing from this site.
The name Hagglunds brings back some memories, usually bad. However I did get involved with original Hagglunds and they were pretty trouble free.
Seeing Fiak tomorrow will pass on your regards.

Hi Tom,
Didn,t know peter had two daughters, the one that I knew of was was called Samia or something like that.
I will phone Faik to have a chat with him and hopefully he will attend the reunion do on the 27th September. Just had an E-mail from Steve Buglass who was a junior with me on the Omariah I think and he is attending, already booked in at the travel lodge Altrincham.

Rgds Brian

Brian Clark Springhall 14th July 2014 16:21

Reunion Saturday 27th Sept ASE Club Altrincham
 
Just to let all who are interested know that the Cresta Court Hotel on Church Road is now fully booked for the 27th evening but there are plenty of rooms at the moment at the Premier Inn which is on the same road as the Cresta Court and within walking distance of the ASE club on Highbank.

PETER NIESCHMIDT 3rd August 2014 14:54

I saw the nice looking Telegraph advert in 1975 and decided to give KSC a go. Never realised they were about to order another 60 ships.
So I guess I've sailed with quite a few of you over the years until the brown envelope reached me in 1986. I've just been to three funerals from recent colleagues and now find some people I sailed with have also gone..gulp!!! Although many names have faded across the horizon some still stand out..arsp. Sam Todd, John Grace, Albie.
I remember a time in Kobe when we got the little map cards with all the shops and bars on so that we wouldn't get lost. The Bar Licky, Bar Honey, Bar Ber... Bar Ber???? We spent ages looking for that one until someone pointed out the red and white pole on the street corner. There wasn't enough space on the map so they split it. Best wishes every one

JohnGrace 9th August 2014 18:52

Hi Peter,
It is funny what tricks the mind plays after all these years. I saw your name in the Hull Nautical Collage thread and though we had sailed together, but I envisaged tankers. I have a picture in my mind of both of us in white overalls on deck having a chat, possibly taking stores in Korea. Thinking about it it must have been Ibn Malik April 77 - Sept 77 or else Ahmad Al Fateh Jan 78 - June 78 both of which were new builds at Ulsan and then the Japanese coast, Taiwan, Honk Kong and Singapore then the Gulf for discharge. I think I did European runs as well on these ships but it was mainly far east that I remember. I used to enjoy the Japanese coast a lot and in those days we used to get plenty of opportunity to go ashore. I do remember the bar cards and there are a few of them shown in the Gallery on this site.Club Rose and Club Licky come to mind, both close to the start of Motomachi, I think. I hope you are well and enjoying your retirement. I was made redundant in September 2011, and then settled into retirement myself

PETER NIESCHMIDT 15th August 2014 19:06

Quote:

Originally Posted by JohnGrace (Post 982194)
Hi Peter,
It is funny what tricks the mind plays after all these years. I saw your name in the Hull Nautical Collage thread and though we had sailed together, but I envisaged tankers. I have a picture in my mind of both of us in white overalls on deck having a chat, possibly taking stores in Korea. Thinking about it it must have been Ibn Malik April 77 - Sept 77 or else Ahmad Al Fateh Jan 78 - June 78 both of which were new builds at Ulsan and then the Japanese coast, Taiwan, Honk Kong and Singapore then the Gulf for discharge. I think I did European runs as well on these ships but it was mainly far east that I remember. I used to enjoy the Japanese coast a lot and in those days we used to get plenty of opportunity to go ashore. I do remember the bar cards and there are a few of them shown in the Gallery on this site.Club Rose and Club Licky come to mind, both close to the start of Motomachi, I think. I hope you are well and enjoying your retirement. I was made redundant in September 2011, and then settled into retirement myself

Hi John!
It was the Ahmad Al Fateh in 1978 with Bob Wilkinson as old man and Bill Sadler as chief, if I remember correctly. I don't know if you remember, on entering the dry dock, there was an 8 foot steel plate, about 1 inch thick where someone had cut a makeshift spanner out of the middle! talk about ingenuity. The dry dock held about three ships which was later increased to six. Quite a size but I doubt if an order the likes of UASC will ever be repeated.

AlbieR 15th August 2014 19:23

"Bob Wilkinson as old man and Bill Sadler as chief". What a trip that must have been, both larger than life characters!

PETER NIESCHMIDT 19th August 2014 20:47

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlbieR (Post 991570)
"Bob Wilkinson as old man and Bill Sadler as chief". What a trip that must have been, both larger than life characters!

To be quite honest, it was one of the best trips I ever made. The rest of the lads names I've long forgotten, but they all made it what it was.. brilliant!

AlbieR 19th August 2014 21:12

Re #264
There was an 8 foot steel plate, about 1 inch thick where someone had cut a makeshift spanner out of the middle!

On Ibn Al Beitar in Hyundai C/E Dave Goodhand, 2/E Don Ross and myself gathered together a toolbox of makeshift tools and mounted them on a board for in the bar, some of them were works of art. Sadly they are now at the bottom of the Gulf along with the ship after she was sunk.

Brian Clark Springhall 10th September 2014 14:03

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlbieR (Post 999650)
Re #264
There was an 8 foot steel plate, about 1 inch thick where someone had cut a makeshift spanner out of the middle!

On Ibn Al Beitar in Hyundai C/E Dave Goodhand, 2/E Don Ross and myself gathered together a toolbox of makeshift tools and mounted them on a board for in the bar, some of them were works of art. Sadly they are now at the bottom of the Gulf along with the ship after she was sunk.

I joined the IBN AL ATHEER after her first trip from Hyundai and there was also a board mounted in my office I think with spanners etc cut from 20mm plate, It had the caption that these were artefacts excavated from the tunnel well by proffessor Nissar Ahmed Chittagong University failed, he was of course the Bangla Serang. I still have the presentation plaque which was left onboard by whoever I relieved, just cannot remember who it was.

AlbieR 10th September 2014 14:34

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brian Clark Springhall (Post 1041666)
I joined the IBN AL ATHEER after her first trip from Hyundai and there was also a board mounted in my office I think with spanners etc cut from 20mm plate, It had the caption that these were artefacts excavated from the tunnel well by proffessor Nissar Ahmed Chittagong University failed, he was of course the Bangla Serang. I still have the presentation plaque which was left onboard by whoever I relieved, just cannot remember who it was.

Hi Brian,
Dave Goodhand was the Chief maiden voyage and we all paid off together at the Kuwait anchorage because of a change of orders to Far East, can't remember you joining though.
Albie

Whoops, just realised I am mixing up Al Beitar and Al Atheer, it's the Ibn Al Beitar that I was talking about

PETER NIESCHMIDT 20th September 2014 18:40

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlbieR (Post 1041746)
Hi Brian,
Dave Goodhand was the Chief maiden voyage and we all paid off together at the Kuwait anchorage because of a change of orders to Far East, can't remember you joining though.
Albie

Whoops, just realised I am mixing up Al Beitar and Al Atheer, it's the Ibn Al Beitar that I was talking about

Anything that moved on deck was usually flogged in Suez. Reminds me of an Irish mate I sailed with who shouted at the West African Bosun 'What the hell are you throwing all that good stuff over the side for,' and the hilarious reply ' Sah! daze all broke, dem boddles got no screws and dem screws got no boddles'. Ah, happy memories!

AlbieR 20th September 2014 21:43

Quote:

Originally Posted by PETER NIESCHMIDT (Post 1062177)
Anything that moved on deck was usually flogged in Suez. Reminds me of an Irish mate I sailed with who shouted at the West African Bosun 'What the hell are you throwing all that good stuff over the side for,' and the hilarious reply ' Sah! daze all broke, dem boddles got no screws and dem screws got no boddles'. Ah, happy memories!

Early days KSC we crew changed at anchor Freetown, the Chief Eng was leaning over the bridge wing watching all the plywood dunnage being thrown overboard saying "The Mate should be on the ball and stop this" little realising all the empty 45 gall oil drums were going the same way over the **** end, as you say, happy days!

Looks like **** end was censored by moderators out but you all know which end I mean.

Engine Serang 5th October 2014 14:40

Aah Freetown crew. I sailed with many crew through the years, Bombay,Karachi, Freetown, White, Barbados and Bangladesh. My preference would be Freetown for their work ethic but I could compromise by having Goanese catering staff.

nick freeman 20th October 2014 12:12

Does anyone know what happened to Chief Electrical officer Vic McCullough? Clive Beaver and myself had a memorable trip with him on the Al Solabiah in 1981.

saudisid 20th October 2014 16:24

Once met Vic at Salou in Spain 1980. His ship[ Small Russian ] was in Barcalona .Daughter was on holiday at same hotel we were.

AlbieR 21st October 2014 00:09

Saudisid now there's a new one, come clean who are you? I have my suspicions, give us a clue.


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