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Eggo 17th April 2007 13:48

Captains Tiger's
 
Where did Blue Flue get those Captains Tigers from,did they havea special school? Never saw one with a buddy, they all looked the same and had similar manerism's. Did they have any friends as it seemed not to me. Did they all really drink the skippers booze ? can't imagine John Prescott as a Captains Tiger 1

Hague 17th April 2007 14:03

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eggo (Post 122248)
Where did Blue Flue get those Captains Tigers from,did they havea special school? Never saw one with a buddy, they all looked the same and had similar manerism's. Did they have any friends as it seemed not to me. Did they all really drink the skippers booze ? can't imagine John Prescott as a Captains Tiger 1

Good afternoon Les,
Can't imagine John Prescott as anything!

Frankal 17th April 2007 22:50

captains Tigers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Eggo (Post 122248)
Where did Blue Flue get those Captains Tigers from,did they havea special school? Never saw one with a buddy, they all looked the same and had similar manerism's. Did they have any friends as it seemed not to me. Did they all really drink the skippers booze ? can't imagine John Prescott as a Captains Tiger 1

I sailed Captains Tiger on the Cable Ship Alert around 1971 and no i did not drink his booze He used to turn the bottles upside down and mark them. I had lots of friends as i also ran the Officers bar. I think i may have got the job for being the only A/S who polished my shoes before turning to

Aldinga 18th April 2007 00:07

Hello Eggo
Sailed with a captain’s tiger on the Dunnottar Castle in 1956 who was quite an accomplished marine artist, I was the officer’s steward and we shared a cabin which opened out on to the boat deck just below the bridge. Any spare moments he had he could be found on the boat deck with easel and canvas. The captain used to two host two art shows each trip, one for the bloods outward and one homeward of which the tiger used to do very well out of. He gave me one of a BP tanker and at the time I did not appreciate it as well as I should have, I did get it home, but have no idea what became of it, and sadly I don’t remember the lads name.

Ron

Tai Pan 19th April 2007 11:29

cant imagine john prescott

Eggo 19th April 2007 11:29

Frankal & Aldinga, Only winding you up as my best mate on Demodacus was Captains Tiger but he always used to help himself to the skippers spirits. That is until he started to put a plimsol mark on the bottles.Best regards Les

Hague 19th April 2007 11:49

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eggo (Post 122642)
Frankal & Aldinga, Only winding you up as my best mate on Demodacus was Captains Tiger but he always used to help himself to the skippers spirits. That is until he started to put a plimsol mark on the bottles.Best regards Les

Les,
First time I've heard of the Plimsol mark referred to in that context. I'll remember that one.
Brgds

Eggo 19th April 2007 22:00

Capt Hague ,did you ever lose any of your booze to your steward? And Frankal (Shiney Shoes) why did the master have to mark the the bottles while you were looking after his quarters ?

Frankal 19th April 2007 22:24

Shiney Shoes
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Eggo (Post 122723)
Capt Hague ,did you ever lose any of your booze to your steward? And Frankal (Shiney Shoes) why did the master have to mark the the bottles while you were looking after his quarters ?

His previous Tiger was a plonky and he trusted nobody I think he came from S Shields Not that the two things are necessarily connected
Frankal

Eggo 19th April 2007 22:48

Never met a master from Shields, they usually breed engineers around there. Best regards Les

Ron Stringer 20th April 2007 00:35

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eggo (Post 122732)
Never met a master from Shields, they usually breed engineers around there. Best regards Les

Then you didn't go to Cleadon - in the 1960s it seemed like half the houses were owned by serving or retired ships' Masters.

Eggo 20th April 2007 06:14

Ron I'm quite sure that many masters come from there it's just seemed like all the chief engineers I sailed with came from around there or the Clyde. They were trained in the many shipbuilding yards in those areas , its sad to see most of those yards closed down .

alex page 23rd April 2007 06:01

the captains new tiger on the Cambridge caused quit a stur when he started doing his scub out in leopard skin pants and a blouse I dont think he lasted very long
Alex

Hague 23rd April 2007 21:49

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eggo (Post 122723)
Capt Hague ,did you ever lose any of your booze to your steward? And Frankal (Shiney Shoes) why did the master have to mark the the bottles while you were looking after his quarters ?

Do know Les, I never gave it a thought. Beer man myself so I don't know whether I would have noticed. Never seemed to be much left after the Agents left in any case.

Brgds

John

Coastie 24th April 2007 00:25

Forgive the ignorance, but what is a Captains Tiger?

Coastie 24th April 2007 04:27

Thankyou, R651400. That would explain why the one in the Leppard skin pants and blouse didn't hang around long!

Tai Pan 7th May 2007 12:03

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hague (Post 122252)
Good afternoon Les,
Can't imagine John Prescott as anything!

On Ulysses, capt safe was a swine to open. the old maN "bulls**t Harris" never mastered it. Tiger was chinese used to come down and tell me capt want safeo pened, usual on top.
This meant a gin and tonic poured ready for me, Tiger always announced "Chief Sparks no can open without drinkee". This meant the old man had to have another etc etc.

Topherjohn 3rd March 2018 12:48

Origin of 'Captain's Tiger' title
 
Does anyone know why and when the Master's steward first became known as the Captain's Tiger? Perhaps in one of the companies such as BI Blue Flu Bibby China Nav etc trading to Asian ports in the 1800s or early 1900s?

vickentallen 3rd March 2018 16:41

Captain always had a Tiger in the RN, as far as I can remember, certainly on the small ships I was on Destroyers, Minesweepers, etc . usually a Seaman .

trotterdotpom 6th March 2018 06:23

I read somewhere that the Captain's Tiger was so called because they used to wear a yellow jersey with black stripes or a black jersey with yellow stripes. Dunno if it's true or not. If it is, I wonder why they weren't called the Captain's Bumblebee.

John T

Farmer John 6th March 2018 09:42

Quote:

Originally Posted by trotterdotpom (Post 2818569)
I read somewhere that the Captain's Tiger was so called because they used to wear a yellow jersey with black stripes or a black jersey with yellow stripes. Dunno if it's true or not. If it is, I wonder why they weren't called the Captain's Bumblebee.

John T

Oh dear, this has started a thought I don't need. Is a yellow and black striped jersey the same as a black and yellow striped jersey, to put your two descriptions another way? And if there is a distinction, do you start by looking at the top most stripe, and taking that as the start, or start from the bottom and work from there. This is my day ruined.

Ray Mac 6th March 2018 09:45

Quote:

Originally Posted by R651400 (Post 123461)
Assistant Steward whose entire duties are to look after the Captain.


Cargo/Tankers: 2nd/Stwd looks after Capt accommodation.

Mad Landsman 6th March 2018 15:49

I have been attempting a little research into the origin of the term 'Captain's Tiger'.
The SOED has the first recorded use to describe a Captain's personal steward as being early 20th Century.

However, Tiger to describe a person was used much earlier:

Before 1400 it came as the term 'Fen Tiger' - A savage or bloodthirsty person; a person of great energy, strength, or courage specifically a native of the Fens.

In the Mid 18th Century Tiger was a slang term for an overdressed person, also a hanger-on or parasite.

By the early 19th Century it became a usually liveried boy acting as a groom, footman, or other servant.

But, by the mid 19th Century Australian slang had it as a person engaged in menial employment; more specifically, a sheep-shearer.

If we go back to the idea of a late 18th Century liveried servant, often overdressed to suit the whims of his employer, and look at the typical livery of the time it is easy to imagine how the use came into currency - Contrasting and distinctive braid in an often striped pattern.

If we transpose this to the type of rig which the late Victorian Captain would probably insist upon being worn by those stewards serving at dinner etc and we have the combination of a 'footman' or Butler in 'extravagant attire' - which would hark back to origins which would have been in living memory then but are forgotten now.


This etymology is a contrast to many words which start at sea and are adopted ashore without care of their origins. This one seems to have made the reverse journey.

Farmer John 6th March 2018 16:48

Thanks for that, ML, it always seemed a fitting term, a certain element of someone to fight the aloof corner of the Old Man, to allow him to do a one track job.

beedeesea 6th March 2018 19:51

While looking for references to Captains' Tigers I came across this, which explains the different ratings among Indian and Pakistani crews. Some good photos as well.
http://www.pandosnco.co.uk/crews.html

Brian


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