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-   -   Five masted schooner CITY OF PORTLAND (https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=296123)

fourmaster1250 2nd January 2020 09:55

Five masted schooner CITY OF PORTLAND
 
2 Attachment(s)
Hello everybody,
some days ago I bought a press photograph on eBay showing the five masted schooner CITY OF PORTLAND. I don't have any information about that ship in my own archive and couldn't find any in the net - very strange for a ship of that size.
Does anybody know more about CITY OF PORTLAND?
Any information will be appreciated.
Reinhard Stadthaus
(fourmaster1250)

stein 2nd January 2020 10:16

The robots are not that good at reading old newspapers, but some information might still be gleaned from these two attempts;

Fri 5 Jan 1917
Page 4
AN AUXILIARY SCHOONER.


A_ ATXILIARY SCHOONER.
eecording to cable advices, the new
-Amnerican fxiliary five-masted schooner
City of Portland has soiled from the
Columbia River for Port "irie with a bli
cargo of lumber. The City of Portlan,?
is the first of the new auxiliary schoon
ers built by Messra. :Charles t. McCor
mick and Co., of St. Helena. Oregon, fo
the Australian timber trade, and just.
before the anst mail left San F'nne?lss
the schooner wr? taken for a run up the
Colombia fliver to take on fuel car?e
BIhe lmanated to make the distance of L.
sae. in tbree hours, meeting wlth n
icur-kcnot currenlt. " "The vessel way
deslgned to make eight knots under
power, and her showing during the trial is
etonsidereed remarkable, considering the
current and the stillness of the engine
bearing. The City of Portland is a five
tuasted 'bald-hended" schooner. t'no
jigger mast i? of hollow steel. The lmo.
tor exhaust is connected to it. All
smoeke emerges from the top of the mast.
The galley stove as well Is connected
to the tust. She has a length over all
of 278tt., beam of 4tft.. and depth of
hold ltfCt. Gin. She' Is fitted with two
semi-Diesel engines of 320 h.p, each. The
vessel has a fuel capacity of 1200 barrels
of oll. The ship is electrically lighted,
throughout. Approximately 300,000tt, of
timber for Port Pirle was carried on the
trial trip below deck, and the vessel
after taking fuel dropped back to the
mill of the Charles R. McCortmack Lum
ber Company to resume her loading. Shle
was built to carry a total cargo of.
2,000,000ft., but according to adviccs, she
had exceeded the expectations of hler
builders in tile matter of carrying capa
city, and by the time the decltload was
on it was expected that the total cargo
would be something like 2,400,000ft. A
crew of 20 'is carried.
_____________________________________________
I ALXILl ARA' SC1I0OM ft CITA' Ol' POTITI AND |
MIAVC VKTI L, XAoclnrsclax
I The five-maated auxiliary nehooner, City of Port* I
land. Jurhed in port this morninjr Irom Honolulu, I
via Port Pirie, This vessel waa launched in the *rly
part of the year, and is the first of seven auxiliary
schooners beinjr built for C. It. MacConnack and
Co,t of San Francisco, to trade with timber cargoes
between the Unite*! States and Australia.

Do not miss this link, and do scroll downwards:

https://books.google.no/books?id=5DM...and%22&f=false

There is a picture on page 124 of Jim Gibbs' "West Coast Windjammers", the caption reads as follows:With two million board feet of lumber packed below and on deck, the five masted auxiliary bald-headed schooner City of Portland put to sea for McCormick lumber interests - destination Australia - 1916

Stephen J. Card 2nd January 2020 16:56

Loading timber through the two ports low and near the stem. Probably no WT bulkheads either!

Stephen

Basil 2nd January 2020 18:11

Is the other ship careened and the Portland set up to be hauled over?

Bootsmann 2nd January 2020 19:03

Looks like the PORTLAND is being used to righten the capsized sailer to the left, lots of wreckage on shore too.

Strickylad44 2nd January 2020 21:34

1 Attachment(s)
Another view >

fourmaster1250 4th January 2020 17:46

Quote:

Originally Posted by stein (Post 3022411)
The robots are not that good at reading old newspapers, but some information might still be gleaned from these two attempts;

Fri 5 Jan 1917
Page 4
AN AUXILIARY SCHOONER.


A_ ATXILIARY SCHOONER.
eecording to cable advices, the new
-Amnerican fxiliary five-masted schooner
City of Portland has soiled from the
Columbia River for Port "irie with a bli
cargo of lumber. The City of Portlan,?
is the first of the new auxiliary schoon
ers built by Messra. :Charles t. McCor
mick and Co., of St. Helena. Oregon, fo
the Australian timber trade, and just.
before the anst mail left San F'nne?lss
the schooner wr? taken for a run up the
Colombia fliver to take on fuel car?e
BIhe lmanated to make the distance of L.
sae. in tbree hours, meeting wlth n
icur-kcnot currenlt. " "The vessel way
deslgned to make eight knots under
power, and her showing during the trial is
etonsidereed remarkable, considering the
current and the stillness of the engine
bearing. The City of Portland is a five
tuasted 'bald-hended" schooner. t'no
jigger mast i? of hollow steel. The lmo.
tor exhaust is connected to it. All
smoeke emerges from the top of the mast.
The galley stove as well Is connected
to the tust. She has a length over all
of 278tt., beam of 4tft.. and depth of
hold ltfCt. Gin. She' Is fitted with two
semi-Diesel engines of 320 h.p, each. The
vessel has a fuel capacity of 1200 barrels
of oll. The ship is electrically lighted,
throughout. Approximately 300,000tt, of
timber for Port Pirle was carried on the
trial trip below deck, and the vessel
after taking fuel dropped back to the
mill of the Charles R. McCortmack Lum
ber Company to resume her loading. Shle
was built to carry a total cargo of.
2,000,000ft., but according to adviccs, she
had exceeded the expectations of hler
builders in tile matter of carrying capa
city, and by the time the decltload was
on it was expected that the total cargo
would be something like 2,400,000ft. A
crew of 20 'is carried.
_____________________________________________
I ALXILl ARA' SC1I0OM ft CITA' Ol' POTITI AND |
MIAVC VKTI L, XAoclnrsclax
I The five-maated auxiliary nehooner, City of Port* I
land. Jurhed in port this morninjr Irom Honolulu, I
via Port Pirie, This vessel waa launched in the *rly
part of the year, and is the first of seven auxiliary
schooners beinjr built for C. It. MacConnack and
Co,t of San Francisco, to trade with timber cargoes
between the Unite*! States and Australia.

Do not miss this link, and do scroll downwards:

https://books.google.no/books?id=5DM...and%22&f=false

There is a picture on page 124 of Jim Gibbs' "West Coast Windjammers", the caption reads as follows:With two million board feet of lumber packed below and on deck, the five masted auxiliary bald-headed schooner City of Portland put to sea for McCormick lumber interests - destination Australia - 1916

Hello stein,
Thank you very much for the helpful information. That makes it a lot easier to understand the photograph and the story behind!
Regards
Reinhard

fourmaster1250 4th January 2020 17:51

Quote:

Originally Posted by Strickylad44 (Post 3022479)
Another view >

Hello Strickylad44,
Thank you very much for the helpful information. Now I even know the name of the capsized four-masted barkentine!
Regards
Reinhard

Strickylad44 4th January 2020 17:56

Quote:

Originally Posted by fourmaster1250 (Post 3022735)
Hello Strickylad44,
Thank you very much for the helpful information. Now I even know the name of the capsized four-masted barkentine!
Regards
Reinhard

Thank you for your reply. It's nice to help. I do like searching for ships that some can't find. (Thumb)

Basil 4th January 2020 18:13

Bootsmann & Strickylad44, Thanks for the answers. I'm now much better informed. (Thumb)

As was allegedly said in a court:

Judge: "Following your presentation I find myself non the wiser."

Barrister: "No, M'Lud, but doubtless better informed!"

Strickylad44 4th January 2020 19:08

1 Attachment(s)
Prinz Valdemar the capsized vessel >

Basil 4th January 2020 20:55

1 Attachment(s)
Beautiful vessel.
Even Fyffes old steam turbo-electric 'S' boats still had counter sterns.

Strickylad44 4th January 2020 22:59

1 Attachment(s)
The City of Portland shown here as 'The Paradise Show Boat' in Albany, near Madison Ave and Riverside Park.

Chillytoes 5th January 2020 00:57

Wonder what Australian port, or ports, she delivered that timber to?

tunatownshipwreck 5th January 2020 05:39

"St Helena Oregon" would actually be Saint Helens, Oregon.

spongebob 5th January 2020 05:51

Quote:

Originally Posted by tunatownshipwreck (Post 3022787)
"St Helena Oregon" would actually be Saint Helens, Oregon.

That might suggest that she carried US west coast timbers the likes of Oregon pine, Cedar or Redwood to Australia for the joinery industry ?

Bob

tunatownshipwreck 6th January 2020 05:28

Quote:

Originally Posted by spongebob (Post 3022789)
That might suggest that she carried US west coast timbers the likes of Oregon pine, Cedar or Redwood to Australia for the joinery industry ?

Bob

Very possible, Redwood mainly grows in southern Oregon and northern California, so that would probably be exported through Eureka or Coos Bay. Pine and cedar have been shipped through the Columbia River for a long time, but the most commonly exported tree was Douglas Fir.

spongebob 6th January 2020 05:37

Tunatown, we call Douglas fir Oregon pine here in Nz .
I have great memories of the Union CO's SS Waitemata steaming into Auckland laden to her marks with North American lumber , mostly cedar that you could smell from 100 yards away. Most of this was for the window joinery trade and for weather boarding, now superseded by alloys and artificial claddings.

Bob

Stephen J. Card 6th January 2020 13:49

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Basil (Post 3022753)
Beautiful vessel.
Even Fyffes old steam turbo-electric 'S' boats still had counter sterns.


Not quite correct. ;-) These turbo-electric 'S' Class had CRUISER sterns. Where is the rudder? It is hung below a CRUISER stern. The PORTLAND had a COUNTER stern... with the rudder from the rudder post off the COUNTER.

Look at AQUITANIA, MAURETANIA, LUSITANIA.... all cruiser sterns. The OLYMPIC, TITANIC, BRITANNIC had counter sterns.

Stumped me years ago about this. Saw it in a Shipbuilder magazine from that period. The correct definition of the stern is "Cruiser Stern with Counter above".

Old Naval vessels in the 18th Century. Very narrow aft and rather low... the 'cruiser stern'.

I believe the combined cruiser & counter above was to improve of the flow from the propellers. Did the 'S' class have twin screws? I think they were. I don't think you could have a cruiser stern with a single screw.


Great photo, excellent detail. Probably the last passenger with this combined stern was on the INDEPENDENCE and CONSTITUTION.

Basil 6th January 2020 21:06

Stephen J. Card,
Thank you, now much better informed (Thumb)

Anyhoo, they look much better than some of those new fangled boats.

spongebob 6th January 2020 22:07

In ship loving terms, " Nice ****"

Bob

tunatownshipwreck 7th January 2020 05:44

Quote:

Originally Posted by spongebob (Post 3022919)
Tunatown, we call Douglas fir Oregon pine here in Nz .


Bob

I still learn something new here.

Strickylad44 7th January 2020 09:29

1 Attachment(s)
What kind of stern is this ? >

stein 7th January 2020 13:24

Looks odd indeed. I am reminded of a discussion here a few years back regarding an Egyptian cruise ship that was heightened with a few decks, or else merely increased the passengers to carry. It was given floats welded to the sides to increase initial stability, and most commentators here declared themselves shocked. However, a Swede claiming to be an expert on the matter claimed everything was as it should be - the ship was perfectly safe. It could be something like that, and it could be something to do with the propulsion, something akin to a cavitation plate on an outboard motor. It loks to me more like my first suggestion though, and I still will not see that overall stability has been increased, if the ship is to traverse large oceans.

I have always thought that a cruiser stern was something like the stern on the Stavangerfjord, maybe because the cruisers I knew of had such a stern. However looking up the Norwegian word “krysserhekk” (cruiser stern) I found the definition that Captain Card gives above. I noted though that all the entries spoke solely of yachts, and gave as contrast a double ender with the whole of the rudder outside. Very few ships of any size had this system, and certainly no steamer or diesel driven vessel. So, even if I have come to regret it all the times I have doubted Captain Card's expertize, I cannot declare myself fully convinced that his definition is the only one in use.

Stephen J. Card 7th January 2020 14:33

4 Attachment(s)
Hi Stein,

'Cruiser Stern' is definitely the same type as STAVANGERFJORD or QUEEN OF BERMUDA and on many well known vessels. Here is a US Torpedo vessel, also with the cruiser stern. The body at the end of the vessel is very full lines. Compared to the stern... counter stern of TITANIC. Very fine lines. AQUITANIA is a combination, cruiser below, counter above. My description was from the Shipbuilder Souvenir issue. The style of counter of AQUITANIA, MAURETANIA etc was only for 'style'. It neither added or detract from the function of rudders and waterline. That is pure cruiser stern. Even in AQUITANIA the steering gear is completely within the bulb, not high in the stern like TITANIC.

As for yachts etc using the name of 'cruiser stern', well they can call it anything they like but the true cruiser stern was the type that was used for fast naval vessels. Even some canal barge types call the stern a 'cruiser stern'.

Combination stern types? Look at Queen Mary 2. Appear to be with a well rounded cruiser stern. Look closer, at the waterline she actually has a flat transom stern.

Stephen


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