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-   -   SY Wendorian (https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=3083)

John_F 7th October 2005 19:48

SY Wendorian
 
1 Attachment(s)
I have asked this question once before without much response but there is now a much larger membership with some very knowledgeable members.
I am trying to find out what happened to the Wendorian. She used to be the training vessel for the King Edward VII Nautical College in London during the 50s & early 60s. She was a regular sight on the Thames as every week she would take a group of would be apprentices from Wapping Basin to Southend where she would anchor for the weekend before making her way back to Wapping on the Monday.
I believe that she was built in 1903 by Hawthorne & Co of Leith, reputedly to be either the King of Spain's or the King of Portugal's Royal yacht. I think her original name was Stephanotis. Her signal letters were GKKB, her official number was 113178 & she was of 143 gross tons.
Hoping Ruud, or someone, can help out with this & I have attached a photo of her in Wapping Basin.

Gulpers 7th October 2005 20:31

John,

No idea of SY Wendorian's ultimate fate. You've probably seen all this stuff before, but Google turned the following links up.

http://www.merchant-navy.net/Pictures/wendorian.html

http://www.bonhams.com/cgi-bin/wspd_...75367-83-2.jpg

http://www.steamboat.org.uk/wwwboard/messages/3464.htm

http://www.steamboat.org.uk/wwwboard/messages/3334.htm

Good luck with your quest.

p.s. Just noticed that John Firman provided one of the photographs in the first link. If that is you, I'm sorry if I've wasted your time.

DAVIDJM 7th October 2005 23:33

hello John

i hope this will help according to wss marine news dec 61 p 310

she was sold by G E Milligan Stalham, Norfolk, to dutch shipbreakers arrived New Waterway 17/11/61

she looked a lovely vessel.
I think she may have been spanish not portugues as that one had to funnels

david

John_F 8th October 2005 00:49

Quote:

Originally Posted by DAVIDJM
hello John

i hope this will help according to wss marine news dec 61 p 310

she was sold by G E Milligan Stalham, Norfolk, to dutch shipbreakers arrived New Waterway 17/11/61

she looked a lovely vessel.
I think she may have been spanish not portugues as that one had to funnels

david

David,
Many thanks for that information. Do you know where New Waterway is?
She was a lovely looking vessel & I thoroughly enjoyed (looking back!!) my week aboard her. Much time spent on lifeboat drill. No Welin McLaughlin davits on her! Block & tackle only which certainly increased the size of your biceps.
Kind regards,
John

John_F 8th October 2005 01:09

SY Wendorian
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gulpers
John,

No idea of SY Wendorian's ultimate fate. You've probably seen all this stuff before, but Google turned the following links up.

http://www.merchant-navy.net/Pictures/wendorian.html

http://www.bonhams.com/cgi-bin/wspd_...75367-83-2.jpg

http://www.steamboat.org.uk/wwwboard/messages/3464.htm

http://www.steamboat.org.uk/wwwboard/messages/3334.htm

Good luck with your quest.

p.s. Just noticed that John Firman provided one of the photographs in the first link. If that is you, I'm sorry if I've wasted your time.

Gulpers,
Many thanks for that but yes - I had explored those contacts & yes - that was me who posted the photo in the first link but thanks for your interest. Hopefully I'll find out a bit more from this site.
Kind regards,
John Firmin

Keltic Star 21st January 2006 06:50

Quote:

Originally Posted by John_F
I have asked this question once before without much response but there is now a much larger membership with some very knowledgeable members.
I am trying to find out what happened to the Wendorian. She used to be the training vessel for the King Edward VII Nautical College in London during the 50s & early 60s. She was a regular sight on the Thames as every week she would take a group of would be apprentices from Wapping Basin to Southend where she would anchor for the weekend before making her way back to Wapping on the Monday.
I believe that she was built in 1903 by Hawthorne & Co of Leith, reputedly to be either the King of Spain's or the King of Portugal's Royal yacht. I think her original name was Stephanotis. Her signal letters were GKKB, her official number was 113178 & she was of 143 gross tons.
Hoping Ruud, or someone, can help out with this & I have attached a photo of her in Wapping Basin.

Have no idea of her fate, but have some good memories of her. Did three King Ted's training weeks on her plus delivery trip in December 1958 and redelivery February 1959 to Richards yard Lowestoff for drydocking.
Lifeboat drills were continuous and most taxing when the Chief Engineer increased the revs just as you had finally rowed the boat alongside. Once restowed in the radial davits the Mate would throw the oil drum overboard once again. However the worst was picking low card with the reward of trimmimg the wing coal bunkers. The only bright spot to that chore was the use of the Captains bath after.
During my time, she was under the command of Capt. Griffiths who was an absolute Gentleman who even ten years later remembered the names of all Cadets who had sailed under him.
She was definately the most beutiful ship I ever sailed on. I understood she was the ex-Spanish Royal Yacht and was actually on load to King Ted's from Billy Butlin who used her as his private yacht and escort vessel for the Channel Swim that he sponsored each year
Regards
Bob Upshon

Jan Hendrik 21st January 2006 07:32

John.
The New Waterway or "Nieuwe Waterweg" in Dutch is the major river through Rotterdam, like the Thames in London.
It actually is the last stretch of the river Rhine but called New Waterway in Rotterdam until it runs into the North Sea.
Then there was a shipyard in Schiedam (next door to Rotterdam) called Werf Nieuwe Waterweg. This was actually a subsidiary or the Rotterdamse Droogdok Maatschappij (RDM) and I spent heaps of time on that yard from 1961 onwards.
There were, by memory, 2 floating drydocks.
It is now closed down and the only way to find archives here is to approach the RDM I would say.
Jan

John_F 21st January 2006 21:15

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jan Hendrik
John.
The New Waterway or "Nieuwe Waterweg" in Dutch is the major river through Rotterdam, like the Thames in London.
It actually is the last stretch of the river Rhine but called New Waterway in Rotterdam until it runs into the North Sea.
Then there was a shipyard in Schiedam (next door to Rotterdam) called Werf Nieuwe Waterweg. This was actually a subsidiary or the Rotterdamse Droogdok Maatschappij (RDM) and I spent heaps of time on that yard from 1961 onwards.
There were, by memory, 2 floating drydocks.
It is now closed down and the only way to find archives here is to approach the RDM I would say.
Jan

Jan,
Many thanks for that - I did go to Rotterdam once with BP but never heard the New Waterway mentioned.
Regards,
John.

John_F 21st January 2006 21:40

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Keltic Star
Have no idea of her fate, but have some good memories of her. Did three King Ted's training weeks on her plus delivery trip in December 1958 and redelivery February 1959 to Richards yard Lowestoff for drydocking.
Lifeboat drills were continuous and most taxing when the Chief Engineer increased the revs just as you had finally rowed the boat alongside. Once restowed in the radial davits the Mate would throw the oil drum overboard once again. However the worst was picking low card with the reward of trimmimg the wing coal bunkers. The only bright spot to that chore was the use of the Captains bath after.
During my time, she was under the command of Capt. Griffiths who was an absolute Gentleman who even ten years later remembered the names of all Cadets who had sailed under him.
She was definately the most beutiful ship I ever sailed on. I understood she was the ex-Spanish Royal Yacht and was actually on load to King Ted's from Billy Butlin who used her as his private yacht and escort vessel for the Channel Swim that he sponsored each year
Regards
Bob Upshon

Bob,
Welcome to the site & I hope you find it as interesting as I do.
The Wendorian was certainly a very graceful vessel though home comforts down below were a bit on the spartan side. My only trip on the Wendorian took place in October 1958 when I was doing a 3 month pre-sea training course at King Ted's before joining BP as a Navigating Apprentice. We must have been at King Ted's together if you sailed on her in December of that year. Captain Griffiths was indeed a perfect gentleman & I have attached a photo of him which was taken at the end of our trip plus one of us all who completed the trip with the cook (Forget his name but most important member of the crew!). You may know some of the faces - I am on the extreme left.
Kind regards,
John F

Frank Baldwin 27th February 2006 02:43

SY Wendorian
 
I was a student cadet at KEVII in 1953. I have fond memories of cruising on the Wendorian. At that time Captain Griffiths was still a lecturer at the college, and one of the favorite instructors. Rumor has it that while he was still shipping-out aboard merchant vessels, a lady passenger asked why he wore a beard. An Apprentice volunteered the information that Captain Griffith had been eating peas off his knife when the ship lurched and he grew the beard to cover the resulting scar. In December 1953, returning to Wapping Basin after completing a training cruise aboard the Wendorian, I broke out in chicken-pox... at the time a highly contageous disease. The entire crew was placed in quarantine and were kept aboard the Wendorian for the entire Christmas holidays. I, however, being beyond the incubation stage of the disease was allowed to go home and spent Christmas with my family. I was not very popular when classes resumed at KEVII after Christmas. Frank Baldwin.
Quote:

Originally Posted by John_F
David,
Many thanks for that information. Do you know where New Waterway is?
She was a lovely looking vessel & I thoroughly enjoyed (looking back!!) my week aboard her. Much time spent on lifeboat drill. No Welin McLaughlin davits on her! Block & tackle only which certainly increased the size of your biceps.
Kind regards,
John


Keltic Star 27th February 2006 06:51

Quote:

Originally Posted by Frank Baldwin
I was a student cadet at KEVII in 1953. I have fond memories of cruising on the Wendorian. At that time Captain Griffiths was still a lecturer at the college, and one of the favorite instructors. Rumor has it that while he was still shipping-out aboard merchant vessels, a lady passenger asked why he wore a beard. An Apprentice volunteered the information that Captain Griffith had been eating peas off his knife when the ship lurched and he grew the beard to cover the resulting scar. In December 1953, returning to Wapping Basin after completing a training cruise aboard the Wendorian, I broke out in chicken-pox... at the time a highly contageous disease. The entire crew was placed in quarantine and were kept aboard the Wendorian for the entire Christmas holidays. I, however, being beyond the incubation stage of the disease was allowed to go home and spent Christmas with my family. I was not very popular when classes resumed at KEVII after Christmas. Frank Baldwin.


I think Captain Griffiths told that story to all Cadets. he used it on us at dinner the first night aboard. It seemed to be icebreaker.

He and Capt. Miller took a group of us down the Thames in the whalers on a Bank Holiday weekend. We actually sailed them rather than the usual rowing in West India Dock and I was lucky to be driven back to the residence at Cromwell Road in Capt. Griffith's ancient Jag convertible. A most memorable weekend.

Any ex KEVII guy's remember the motor launch used for boatwork that was moored alongside the H.Q.S. Wellington?
Bob

John_F 27th February 2006 10:10

Quote:

Originally Posted by Keltic Star
Any ex KEVII guy's remember the motor launch used for boatwork that was moored alongside the H.Q.S. Wellington?
Bob

Bob,
I think she was called the Magellan but not sure. I remember on one occasion, with Captain Miller in command, taking it from Wapping Basin back to the Wellington. In Shadwell Basin he decided to show us how powerful the Magellan was by taking in tow a London barge. Unfortunately, going through the locks, the barge man didn't get a line ashore quickly enough to slow his progress & the Magellan acted as a fender for the barge against the lock wall. Much creaking of timbers & we cadets thought we would be taking a dip. However, she must have been very strongly built as she survived with no signs of any leaks & we made it to the Wellington without any further happenings, where I had my first experience of climbing a rope ladder.
Kind regards,
John.

macjack 6th March 2006 15:09

TS/SY Wendorian
 
I commenced my seagoing career at KE V11 NC 1952 and indeed have very fond memories of her - notably the coal fired boilers, and covering an early morning watch at anchor, in the boiler room with strict instructions - two shovels of coal every hour or similar -I put the whole lot in as soon as he left and got my head down within an hour the safety valve blew!!!! The noise - I will not bore you with further details,you can guess.
I followed thro' a few years ago regarding "Wendorian" in Ships Monthly and had a wonderful reply from Capt Miller, Master at the time I was aboard - a copy of his reply which I think will answer all your questions, I will post ASAP.
I have only just registered so hope I can get things right, if not please bear with me.

John_F 6th March 2006 18:26

S/Y Wendorian
 
Macjack,
Welcome to the site - don't become addicted like the rest of us!
Look forward to reading Captain Miller's letter. Is he still alive, do you know?
Looking at your profile, my career followed your lines pretty much exactly except that I only did 6 years with BP.
Kind regards,
John F

macjack 7th March 2006 11:45

Wendorian
 
1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by John_F
I have asked this question once before without much response but there is now a much larger membership with some very knowledgeable members.
I am trying to find out what happened to the Wendorian. She used to be the training vessel for the King Edward VII Nautical College in London during the 50s & early 60s. She was a regular sight on the Thames as every week she would take a group of would be apprentices from Wapping Basin to Southend where she would anchor for the weekend before making her way back to Wapping on the Monday.
I believe that she was built in 1903 by Hawthorne & Co of Leith, reputedly to be either the King of Spain's or the King of Portugal's Royal yacht. I think her original name was Stephanotis. Her signal letters were GKKB, her official number was 113178 & she was of 143 gross tons.
Hoping Ruud, or someone, can help out with this & I have attached a photo of her in Wapping Basin.

As promised, I attach the reply I received from Capt Miller in response to my letter in " Ships Monthly " I hope this answers some of you questions.
Regards,
Mac.
I also hope my reply c/w attachment works.
I had to post attachment this way due to size restrictions imposed.

John_F 7th March 2006 16:20

SY Wendorian
 
MacJack,
That's marvellous - her full history. Thanks very much for that. How long ago was that article published? Do you know if Captain Miller is still alive?
Kind regards,
John.

R58484956 7th March 2006 16:31

There is a AGW Miller in the current edition of Southampton phone book, same address as shown on above macjack attachment.

Keltic Star 7th March 2006 17:05

Captain Miller
 
macjack:
Thanks for publishing the letter from Capt. Miller, brings back some very fond memories. Am inj the UK at the end of this month and might call him, he must be at least mid eighties now and think I owe him a drink after all we put him through.
Bob

macjack 7th March 2006 21:28

Quote:

Originally Posted by John_F
MacJack,
That's marvellous - her full history. Thanks very much for that. How long ago was that article published? Do you know if Captain Miller is still alive?
Kind regards,
John.

John, that was published Dec 1992 - now I sailed on her Sept 1952, assuming he to be 40, as he was in command, having in all probability been in command elsewhere, would put his year of birth around 1912, (94) could still well be around.
Mac.

Keltic Star 15th March 2006 05:38

1 Attachment(s)
Just found another pic of the Wendorian. This was the postcard that all Cadets were given after a trip aboard.

Andy 22nd January 2008 11:34

Birdforum received the following from Tony White.

With reference to What Happened to the Wendorian?

This is from memorary, and I have no hard recorded facts.

I did 2nd Mates in '61, and about that time King Edward VII had replaced the dear old 'Wendy' with the Glen Strathalan, as I recall. The Wendorian failed her main survey, and I believe this was mainly due to
excessive corrosion in the aft region somewhere in the tailshaft area? The
costs of repair were beyond the colleges resources. She was never owned by the college, and it was said that her owner was either a dear old lady
from the west country, or that she had been left in the estate of a dear
old lady to be used for the benefit of young persons to gain experience at sea.

I assume that as funds were not available that she was scrapped. One way to find out is to search Lloyd's, and all those records are/were held at the Guildhall Library in London.

I had some great times on her, including the Billy Butlin sponsored cross channel swim of 1956 where she acted as command vessel for the smaller boats escorting the swimmers. The great man was aboard for a time, but the
weather was awful, and I don't think anyone completed the swim.

I see a caption of "Glyn Griff" in the press cutting. He went from the college to become the first master of the STA "Winston Churchill", and subsequently the Malcolm Miller.

Keltic Star 22nd January 2008 16:19

Thanks for the update Andy.

John_F 24th January 2008 22:30

Andy,
Many thanks for that. More foliage for the Wendorian family tree. Macjack's extract from "Ships Monthly" gave a good outline of her life, courtesy of Captain Miller, ex Master of the Wendorian. I remember him well from my days at King Ted's as a strong but fair disciplinarian. His letter to "Ships Monthly" (inserted earlier in this thread) tells the tale of her end.
Thanks once again for this additional info.
Kind regards,
John.

Tom Wood 20th September 2009 23:14

SY - Wendorian
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by macjack (Post 43425)
As promised, I attach the reply I received from Capt Miller in response to my letter in " Ships Monthly " I hope this answers some of you questions.
Regards,
Mac.
I also hope my reply c/w attachment works.
https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/images/smilies/jump3.gifI had to post https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/images...3.gif(Applause) attachment https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/images...s/appl.gifthis way https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/images...es/appl.gifdue to size restrictions imposed.

https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/images/smilies/appl.gif

Just found this web page and I'm thrilled to find out about the SY - Wendorian.
I was a cadet at K.E. V11 in 1951 and remember most of the captains (Principle Capt. Chase) Gulliver was the maintenance guy at Cromwell Rd boarding.
We trained on the Wendorian and the Magellan launch on the Thames.
I wondered if any cadets were still around - hopefully.
I would appreciate any news - I know I am a bit late but would love to hear from any cadets - Do send me an email of any news.
Thanks God Bless - Tom (Applause)

Tom Wood 26th September 2009 17:18

K.e.v11
 
(Applause)

Hi Frank,
If you are still reading the posts then please email me and we could chat.
I was also a cadet around the same time as you and would be interested to hear from others.
Be well and take care. Tom


Quote:

Originally Posted by Frank Baldwin (Post 41280)
I was a student cadet at KEVII in 1953. I have fond memories of cruising on the Wendorian. At that time Captain Griffiths was still a lecturer at the college, and one of the favorite instructors. Rumor has it that while he was still shipping-out aboard merchant vessels, a lady passenger asked why he wore a beard. An Apprentice volunteered the information that Captain Griffith had been eating peas off his knife when the ship lurched and he grew the beard to cover the resulting scar. In December 1953, returning to Wapping Basin after completing a training cruise aboard the Wendorian, I broke out in chicken-pox... at the time a highly contageous disease. The entire crew was placed in quarantine and were kept aboard the Wendorian for the entire Christmas holidays. I, however, being beyond the incubation stage of the disease was allowed to go home and spent Christmas with my family. I was not very popular when classes resumed at KEVII after Christmas. Frank Baldwin.



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