Ships Nostalgia

Ships Nostalgia (https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/forum.php)
-   The Radio Room (https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/forumdisplay.php?f=365)
-   -   Ctv (https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=294817)

spaarks 10th September 2019 16:34

Ctv
 
1 Attachment(s)
Many of you who were at sea in the 1960's will remember CTV, a Portuguese coast station at Cape Saint Vincent, which broadcast WX forecasts..

We nicknamed it "Gentle Jesus" on account of it's tendency of using phrases like "gentle breezes", and "partly cloudy with increasing nebulosity".

It was hard to miss, as the transmitter had a serious chirp.
Listen to the attached sound file (I think its working frequency was 480 though, not 418).

howardang 10th September 2019 20:49

Quote:

Originally Posted by spaarks (Post 3002973)
Many of you who were at sea in the 1960's will remember CTV, a Portuguese coast station at Cape Saint Vincent, which broadcast WX forecasts..

We nicknamed it "Gentle Jesus" on account of it's tendency of using phrases like "gentle breezes", and "partly cloudy with increasing nebulosity".

It was hard to miss, as the transmitter had a serious chirp.
Listen to the attached sound file (I think its working frequency was 480 though, not 418).

If that is Monsanto Radio, I also remember the phrase "Wind - gentle zephyrs". It never seemed to vary!

Howard

Ron Stringer 10th September 2019 21:22

Phrases I recall are "gentle breezes" (hence the nickname of the station, "Gentle Jesus"), "mild zephyrs" and "smooth wavelets". And all the time it was blowing an absolute hooley on deck and we were rolling on our beam ends. But in the radio room - according to Monsanto - everything was peaceful.

R651400 11th September 2019 03:27

Think Monsanto/CTV has had as big an airing as any coast station on the SN Radio Room forum and my recollection of copying his wx forecast in the 50's the word wasn't "breezes" but "zephyrs."

Troppo2 11th September 2019 05:24

That is a CHIRP, for sure!

(Jester)

spaarks 11th September 2019 11:35

Quote:

Originally Posted by howardang (Post 3003009)
If that is Monsanto Radio, I also remember the phrase "Wind - gentle zephyrs". It never seemed to vary!

Howard

Yes indeed, it was called Monsanto Radio, and gentle zephyrs was the term.

spaarks 11th September 2019 11:49

Quote:

Originally Posted by Troppo2 (Post 3003031)
That is a CHIRP, for sure!

(Jester)

Sadly the sound file is not a real recording, but made using Audacity.

I use such files as notifications on my phone - eg QTC, QRJ, SMS, and even the names of contacts in Whatsapp. It sure turns heads, and the chirped version drives people crazy (MAD)!

Earlier Nokias used SMS in morse code.

beedeesea 11th September 2019 14:11

Did anybody ever discover WHY they actually used such quaint English? Was it perhaps just a case of standard formats being repeated over the years?

Brian

david.hopcroft 11th September 2019 19:21

The thing is though, we all took it down and trundled it through to the bridge !!

David
+

Ron Stringer 11th September 2019 19:23

Quote:

Originally Posted by david.hopcroft (Post 3003147)
The thing is though, we all listened to him !!

David
+

Guilty, but I don't know why I did - they were useless as weather reports and even worse as forecasts. Only needed a few references to sea monsters and unicorns to complete the picture.

Harry Nicholson 11th September 2019 19:42

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron Stringer (Post 3003017)
Phrases I recall are "gentle breezes" (hence the nickname of the station, "Gentle Jesus"), "mild zephyrs" and "smooth wavelets". And all the time it was blowing an absolute hooley on deck and we were rolling on our beam ends. But in the radio room - according to Monsanto - everything was peaceful.

What a delightful chirrup! The nostalgia brings me close to damp eyes.
Was the origin of the chirp due to an overly simple design, so that the keying load detuned the oscillator?
Port Sudan had a wobbly note too, as I recall.

sparks69 11th September 2019 21:56

I guess the " gentle zephyrs " was what an old translation book would have come up with ?
If English was not your first language it would not be obvious.
I liked receiving them, it made a change from the usual.
The chirp was nice too.

Remember TAH they sounded rough, the Spanish stations has strange tones too.
Any others with weird tones ?

spacetracker 11th September 2019 22:56

Quote:

Originally Posted by david.hopcroft (Post 3003147)
The thing is though, we all took it down and trundled it through to the bridge !!

David
+

Some Clan Line captains were obsessed with the wx report and didn't settle until they had a copy in their grubby mitts. Pretty weird when considering the total inaccuracy of the contents.

Troppo2 12th September 2019 00:24

Quote:

Originally Posted by spaarks (Post 3003083)
Sadly the sound file is not a real recording, but made using Audacity.

I use such files as notifications on my phone - eg QTC, QRJ, SMS, and even the names of contacts in Whatsapp. It sure turns heads, and the chirped version drives people crazy (MAD)!

Earlier Nokias used SMS in morse code.

Ha! I use a ringtone that says:

VLLB DE VIS QRJ K

beedeesea 12th September 2019 14:33

Quote:

Originally Posted by sparks69 (Post 3003171)
I guess the " gentle zephyrs " was what an old translation book would have come up with ?
If English was not your first language it would not be obvious.
I liked receiving them, it made a change from the usual.
The chirp was nice too.

Remember TAH they sounded rough, the Spanish stations has strange tones too.
Any others with weird tones ?

Makes sense, Sparky. Sounded like Shakespeare's wx forecast for "The Tempest"!

Brian

Worldspan 12th September 2019 20:24

I think there was another Portuguese station with the call CTH. These were the initials of CT Holmes, one of the old-timer lecturers at Norwood Tech in the 1950s.
W

Paul Braxton 12th September 2019 23:33

Re #16 :

And GLD was G. L. Danielson from the same venerable institute, the co-author of the renowned "Marine Radio Manual", the blue and white tome you had to purchase on joining or get chucked off the course. (I still have my pristine edition, hardly ever looked at, then or now).

G4UMW 13th September 2019 15:28

The station near Cape St. Vincent is Sagres Radio, callsign CTS. Monsanto Radio is located near Lisbon.

On the subject of stations with distinctive tones, Dakar/6VA had a very distinctive rasping tone on HF.

sparkie2182 13th September 2019 20:59

6VA........once heard never forgotten

sparks69 13th September 2019 22:47

6VA - good for getting rid of OBS if in a hurry. (Filum night etc)
The real reason was I loved sending that call sign on my side swiper keyer.
Pure poetry !

R651400 14th September 2019 06:52

The thread here is worth a look at for that elusive coast station call-sign or adding to if not there.
Comparing 5-ton chirp and drift to the Spanish coast stations or worse Alexandria/SUH I don't recall CTV as being that bad.
Lisboa/CUL was as solida a signal as you'd find anywhere.

sparkie2182 14th September 2019 09:05

U.S.C.G were my stations of choice for AMVER and OBS.

Always returned with AA00.

🙂

trotterdotpom 16th September 2019 14:34

Quote:

Originally Posted by Troppo2 (Post 3003187)
Ha! I use a ringtone that says:

VLLB DE VIS QRJ K

Aha ... Lake Barrine? Why do I remember that?

John T

trotterdotpom 16th September 2019 14:41

Quote:

Originally Posted by sparks69 (Post 3003171)
I guess the " gentle zephyrs " was what an old translation book would have come up with ?
If English was not your first language it would not be obvious.
I liked receiving them, it made a change from the usual.
The chirp was nice too.

Remember TAH they sounded rough, the Spanish stations has strange tones too.
Any others with weird tones ?

Pretty sure Monsanto was a Portuguese naval station - you could send OBS to them if you could get an answer out of them.

Sometime in the '70s I think, they switched from "zephyrs" to "breezes".

They reported me to Geneva or somewhere for something or other. I lost a lot of sleep over that and cross complained about them not keeping watch.

John T

trotterdotpom 16th September 2019 14:48

Quote:

Originally Posted by sparks69 (Post 3003447)
6VA - good for getting rid of OBS if in a hurry. (Filum night etc)
The real reason was I loved sending that call sign on my side swiper keyer.
Pure poetry !

I remember being lured into a "nightclub" in 6VA (Dakar to the uninitiated) by a young lady who took her top off in the street. Wow! Thinking about it now, if I'd been as consciencious about suncream then as I am now, it would have been "poetry in lotion".

John T


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 23:48.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.