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  #26  
Old 15th July 2019, 16:45
Pilot mac Pilot mac is offline  
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To get my Panama ticket I just had to have my British ticket witnessed by a 'Notary Public' and then the difficult bit, the medical. I had only ever had the old pool medical which was pretty basic to say the least, the Panama version was pages long and asked for xrays, samples etc etc etc. Took it to my GP and he filled it in in about 10 minutes which was good enough for them.

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  #27  
Old 15th July 2019, 19:01
John Cassels John Cassels is offline  
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For joining the Burmah Legacy 1980 , needed a Liberian Master's ticket but don't remember any exams , medicals etc. Company ( Denholms) arranged ecerything
and ticket arrived in the post just before I left home.
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  #28  
Old 15th July 2019, 21:12
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Stephen J. Card Stephen J. Card is online now  
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John, yes if you have a ticket the Liberians will give you on of theirs. So no problem. In my case I had a Mate FG and Masters written part. No enough sea time to do the orals. However, my sea time was good for Liberian cert so I sat for their exams. A year later I did UK Master's orals and it all finished. Yes, the Liberian do require the medical. Not that strict at all.

Good friend needed a Panamanian Master's ticket. Went to New York, paid the fee etc. A few days he had the ticket. Back in his hotel he found he has a Panamanian CHIEF ENGINEER's ticket. Went back to get the correct ticket. He had to pay another fee to get Master's ticket, but he was able to keep the CHENG's ticket!
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  #29  
Old 16th July 2019, 07:33
harry t. harry t. is offline
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Originally Posted by John Cassels View Post
needed a Liberian Master's ticket but don't remember any exams ,
The owner arranged for me to meet the examiner in Dubai. Over a coffee we discussed current affairs, when on my way, he got me to sign a form, produced a Panamanian certificate, and that was that.
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  #30  
Old 16th July 2019, 08:46
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Ships GM question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen J. Card View Post
John, yes if you have a ticket the Liberians will give you on of theirs. So no problem. In my case I had a Mate FG and Masters written part. No enough sea time to do the orals. However, my sea time was good for Liberian cert so I sat for their exams. A year later I did UK Master's orals and it all finished. Yes, the Liberian do require the medical. Not that strict at all.

Good friend needed a Panamanian Master's ticket. Went to New York, paid the fee etc. A few days he had the ticket. Back in his hotel he found he has a Panamanian CHIEF ENGINEER's ticket. Went back to get the correct ticket. He had to pay another fee to get Master's ticket, but he was able to keep the CHENG's ticket!
Many moons ago I went along to the Panamanian embassy in Manhattan to get my Panamanian ticket ($10). I went with the Ch.Engineer and the Ch.Steward. Back on board and checking our new tickets over a beer, found that the Ch.Steward's was "Chief Steward (Steam & Diesel)".
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  #31  
Old 16th July 2019, 09:34
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Varley Varley is offline   SN Supporter
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Perhaps they had tasted his fare?
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  #32  
Old 16th July 2019, 10:26
Engine Serang Engine Serang is offline  
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Probably we all have sailed with Mates who were not sound on GM, BM, GZ and TPI. Similarly Engineers who were flaky on blowing down a gauge glass or the finer points of the 15ppm meter, but these were the exception.

I still get the sweats, 43 years later, sitting in the waiting room waiting to be called in for Orals by the Examiner, Bob Barr. Very few Engineers breezed through the written exams and the Orals, bullsh1t baffles brains but not in BOT/DTI examinations.
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  #33  
Old 16th July 2019, 11:44
OilJiver OilJiver is offline  
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Almost 40 years since similar sweats when up for Orals @ Hull. Though DTI Examiner there had a reputation for being even handed. (Unlike his allegedly fearsome colleague on the Tyne).

So cannily enough, all the guys who’d studied at Shields, all came down to Hull for Orals. And consequently, local Examiner inundated by numbers.

Solution? Ncl Examiner comes down to help out. Candidates split 50:50 and I was one of those to have a nice chat with the visitor. (Thanks Shields guys!).

Through the wringer alright, but anyway, only went and passed me! Could have kissed him!
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  #34  
Old 16th July 2019, 13:04
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Originally Posted by OilJiver View Post
Almost 40 years since similar sweats when up for Orals @ Hull. Though DTI Examiner there had a reputation for being even handed. (Unlike his allegedly fearsome colleague on the Tyne).

So cannily enough, all the guys whod studied at Shields, all came down to Hull for Orals. And consequently, local Examiner inundated by numbers.

Solution? Ncl Examiner comes down to help out. Candidates split 50:50 and I was one of those to have a nice chat with the visitor. (Thanks Shields guys!).

Through the wringer alright, but anyway, only went and passed me! Could have kissed him!
Could you be on about to Captain Diston. He was a gent. Always opened the door before he threw you out.

One story about him a guy was up for Second Mates after about 15 mins says Diston I am going to close my eyes. If you are still there when I open them the only thing I can do is give you 6 months sea time. Send the next one in.

I had him for Masters Orals twice. First time he passed me but I did not get writens before they ran out. On second time his first comment was when are you going to get writens. Spent the next 30 mins talking about the state of the world. He asked me one question. Told me half the answer then said " Its Beer Time " go on you have passed. When I did pass [ good attendance ] the clerk took my Exn 16 to him to sign. Came back and said he wants to see you. I went in and he is sat his deck pipe blowing smoke. say Diston " Well done for not giving up "
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  #35  
Old 16th July 2019, 13:59
OilJiver OilJiver is offline  
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Apologies Sid.

I know we should be on the Bridge, but Serang is responsible for deflection elsewhere.

I was referring to Oral exam at Hull for, Certificate of Competency as Second Class Engineer of a Motorship.

But were you not meaning Captain Dyson (as opposed Diston)? He had a fine reputation and sounds like the man you describe.
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  #36  
Old 16th July 2019, 16:36
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Originally Posted by OilJiver View Post
Apologies Sid.

I know we should be on the Bridge, but Serang is responsible for deflection elsewhere.

I was referring to Oral exam at Hull for, Certificate of Competency as Second Class Engineer of a Motorship.

But were you not meaning Captain Dyson (as opposed Diston)? He had a fine reputation and sounds like the man you describe.
The Examiner for Masters and Mates in Hull in the 70s was John Diston. When I first went up for Masters with him I was an hour late going in as things had happened. i went in and after about an hour the clerk brought in his afternoon cuppa. Diston says to me do you mind if Captain Morgan had his tea here. When Tom Morgan walked in Diston says to him " You were a right B when you were Master. Lad from Ellermans here and hes been telling me all about you. I had never sailed with Tom Morgan. All in all he was gent. Had his ways but if you knew them ok
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  #37  
Old 16th July 2019, 16:49
Engine Serang Engine Serang is offline  
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In the 70's the Examiners Clerk was Cousins, I think Len or Les Cousins and he could work out your sea-time just by looking at you. I was more afraid of him than the Examiner.
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  #38  
Old 16th July 2019, 17:40
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I didn't think you were Turkish, E-S, and here you have given the lie to being young.

Written stuff for R/O was a relative breeze after failing A levels, as was fixing the faulted gear (although when faulting one myself during the course clever clogs did manage to fry an important bit he didn't mean to). Morse was different. I was given a retest on the day of the practical. On managing to achieve the required 15/20 words per minute at the second attempt the examiner said "Well why didn't you do that the first time".

Our tickets were meant to be endorsed at 6 months 1 year and 2 years. Not really important when sailing on a British ship as the Discharge book gave the same information. I got the 6 month signed off (Mr. Jardine in Liverpool) and, when working part of one leave out of the London docks got my 2 years signed off by Harry Guilder, something of a character (as the tea boy I was useful in holding the surveyors hand as Harry insisted on a tech being in attendance. Never bothered with the two year. I cannot presently put my hands on my Liberian certificate to see if I am qualified for both steam and diesel driven radio rooms.
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  #39  
Old 16th July 2019, 19:26
saudisid saudisid is offline  
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Originally Posted by Engine Serang View Post
In the 70's the Examiners Clerk was Cousins, I think Len or Les Cousins and he could work out your sea-time just by looking at you. I was more afraid of him than the Examiner.
Eng Serang
You may well be right about the Engine Clerk but the Masters and Mates clerk in the early 70's was George. He was relived by a woman mid 70's
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  #40  
Old 16th July 2019, 21:55
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Recollect a colleague who'd been a marine architect trying to explain metacentric height etc to me. Don't think I ever actually understood it.
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  #41  
Old 16th July 2019, 22:34
OilJiver OilJiver is offline  
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The Examiner for Masters and Mates in Hull in the 70s was John Diston. When I first went up for Masters with him I was an hour late going in as things had happened. i went in and after about an hour the clerk brought in his afternoon cuppa. Diston says to me do you mind if Captain Morgan had his tea here. When Tom Morgan walked in Diston says to him " You were a right B when you were Master. Lad from Ellermans here and hes been telling me all about you. I had never sailed with Tom Morgan. All in all he was gent. Had his ways but if you knew them ok
Nice story Sid, thanks.

Your man sounds very much like the same gent Im thinking of. So maybe I have the name wrong. (Long time since etc).

As a 16 year old when first going to Posterngate to get registered etc, I thought the place a bit foreboding.
Anyhow, at the time, DB numbering was in transition from R to UK prefix and I was given one of the earlier UK numbers. Was pretty pleased with the allocated number though, & spent about a year after trying to do Sean Connery impersonations.
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  #42  
Old 17th July 2019, 18:48
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I saw a TV program a few years back (I think it was BBC) about a lost container ship in heavy weather. The erudite gentleman in front of the board said that the righting lever was something the Captain used to keep the boat straight. If he put it in the wrong place there could be problems. Something to do with GM.
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  #43  
Old 17th July 2019, 20:23
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Stephen J. Card Stephen J. Card is online now  
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Try YouTube. Several good clips 'stability'. Two or three are EXCELLENT. Others are so bad the lecturers should be sacked! Good graphics too.
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  #44  
Old 19th July 2019, 15:52
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Right. All written answers with some multiple choice. The thing is the vast amount of questions. On a DOT paper you might have seven or eight questions and you must answer four or five. The Liberian 'paper' might only one question on the paper. If multiple choice there have several questions. The Liberian method might be the most useful way to test your knowledge.

Have a look at the US Coat Guard examinations. They are all multiple choice and by LAW, ALL of the questions that might be asked in the exams MUST be published! You can find a huge book with all of the questions. You can study the book and then take a chance. I am not certain is the system work well or not. Perhaps some of the SN gang will tell what they did.

Stephen
Thanks for the information Stephen. I very much doubt I could pass anyone's tickets these days, the old grey matter probably isn't up to it! I shall search out the US Coastguard exam questions and see what sort of questions they get.

Added subsequently - I've found the USCG site for exams and it appears very thorough. Surprisingly I found I could answer most of the 'free' questions, so brain works after all!

Last edited by MMA; 19th July 2019 at 16:05.. Reason: Added more infomation.
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  #45  
Old 19th July 2019, 15:59
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Thanks for the information Stephen. I very much doubt I could pass anyone's tickets these days, the old grey matter probably isn't up to it! I shall search out the US Coastguard exam questions and see what sort of questions they get.
Was there a time when your ticket was 'valid' for life, not this revalidation every 5 years.

When you find the Coastguard exam on www, please let us know. We can have a bit of fun!

Stephen
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  #46  
Old 19th July 2019, 16:26
Engine Serang Engine Serang is offline  
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I saw a TV program a few years back (I think it was BBC) about a lost container ship in heavy weather. The erudite gentleman in front of the board said that the righting lever was something the Captain used to keep the boat straight. If he put it in the wrong place there could be problems. Something to do with GM.
Probably a Sin Theta ( Sin ϑ ) in there somewhere.
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  #47  
Old 19th July 2019, 20:04
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Probably a Sin Theta ( Sin ϑ ) in there somewhere.

Yes, and we are happy when that angle of list is LESS than 15 degrees!
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  #48  
Old 19th July 2019, 22:31
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Originally Posted by OilJiver View Post
Almost 40 years since similar sweats when up for Orals @ Hull. Though DTI Examiner there had a reputation for being even handed. (Unlike his allegedly fearsome colleague on the Tyne).

So cannily enough, all the guys whod studied at Shields, all came down to Hull for Orals. And consequently, local Examiner inundated by numbers.

Solution? Ncl Examiner comes down to help out. Candidates split 50:50 and I was one of those to have a nice chat with the visitor. (Thanks Shields guys!).

Through the wringer alright, but anyway, only went and passed me! Could have kissed him!
Was in front of Mr. Clarke in Newcastle, early 80's, Class II Motor, failed as just been made redundant, went next month after much work and good writtens, as soon as I walked in knew had failed again.
So third go down to Hull, examiner noted I had some experience of the exam and I walked out 20 minutes later with my certificate!
.
Dannic
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  #49  
Old 19th July 2019, 22:49
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Up for Mate's in Glasgow. One candidate was giving us all 'gen' on how to pass writtens and orals. He had lots of experience. Had to have had. He must have failed about half a dozen attempts! Lunch time at the DTI canteen. At least a dozen of us in the line with the tray. 'George' was giving one of his 'lectures' and quite loudly. We were trying to shut him off. The gentleman in front of 'George' was the EXAMINER! We knew who he was but 'George' didn't. Twit. I don't think 'George' passed at the 6th attempt either!
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  #50  
Old 21st July 2019, 12:36
OilJiver OilJiver is offline  
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So third go down to Hull, examiner noted I had some experience of the exam and I walked out 20 minutes later with my certificate!

Dannic
There was a wine bar in/near Posterngate around that time Dannic. Must have been the closest hostelry to the Marine Office, because I went directly in there after being given the same news as you!

Bar run by offhand early 80s posers, begrudgingly serving beer (expensive bottled) in half pint glasses only - would never go in such a place in other circumstances. But I guess sometimes you can make exceptions. Hope you had time to celebrate a little after your pass also.
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