Harland and Wolff - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
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Harland and Wolff

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  #26  
Old 9th August 2019, 02:31
noelmavisk noelmavisk is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by searover View Post
I feel compelled to comment here. While with P&O, three stays underlined that the Northern Ireland workers at Harland and Wolff were second to none. Always fun, good company and more than willing to be helpful with a joke and smile..
That brings to mind the day I went aboard the Loch Loyal in Belfast togged up in in my not quite white boiler-suit and was asked by one of the painter's if I was 'flat white or gloss'
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  #27  
Old 9th August 2019, 18:54
stevekelly10 stevekelly10 is offline  
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Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy View Post
Hi Steve,
What is the SWL of those cranes in the building hsll? I was never in there, it is after my time. I remember the two 60 ton gantry cranes in
the Polaris bay, built in the 60s for the undercover construction of the nuclear submarines which were then rolled out onto the slipway under two large 60 ton Butters cranes similar to those just demolished at no 5 dock. They were very handy cranes, easy to drive and comfortable.
From what you say it sounds like the days of specialist crane drivers are on their way out, at least as far as gantry cranes are concerned.
Regards
Pat
Sorry Pat my memory is not what it use to be But the cranes capacity was definitely over 200 tons each and even better they could be operated in tandem by one operator using the remote control ! Just before I left Lairds, they asked if any of the fitters were interested in training up as crane operators ! That went down like a lead balloon with the riggers as you can imagine


Regards


Steve
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  #28  
Old 9th August 2019, 22:19
biggerbob biggerbob is offline  
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The two cranes at H&W will not be going anywhere. They are Listed Monuments and cannot be altered or removed. Looks like they'll last longer than the yard.
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  #29  
Old 9th August 2019, 23:23
Engine Serang Engine Serang is offline  
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I suppose painting them is like painting the Forth Bridge.
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  #30  
Old 10th August 2019, 08:53
harry t. harry t. is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Engine Serang View Post
I suppose painting them is like painting the Forth Bridge.
A job and finish!


and, a painter today, all geared up.
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  #31  
Old 10th August 2019, 12:07
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jmcg jmcg is offline
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In my game, we call them "dopes on ropes".

On a serious note, I understand that the Scottish shipbuilder Ferguson is in receivership.

Tragic indeed.

BW

J
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  #32  
Old 10th August 2019, 13:10
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Originally Posted by jmcg View Post
In my game, we call them "dopes on ropes".

On a serious note, I understand that the Scottish shipbuilder Ferguson is in receivership.

Tragic indeed.

BW

J
Fergusons still have two unfinished Calmac ferries in the yard. It is unclear what will happen to them.
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  #33  
Old 11th August 2019, 06:48
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searover searover is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by searover View Post
I feel compelled to comment here. While with P&O, three stays underlined that the Northern Ireland workers at Harland and Wolff were second to none. Always fun, good company and more than willing to be helpful with a joke and smile.

First, there when "Chusan" was fitted for air conditioning throughout, in 1959/60 - Ask for a favour? No problem - Workmanship? I only saw the best.

Next was with "Canberra", providing the final touches, prior to the trials and handing over the ship from H&W to P&O before the 1961 Maiden Voyage. My final stay was when the "Canberra" returned to recover from the ship's fire in late 1962, limping back to Belfast from the Med. All this was before "The Troubles".
The reason I made positive comments of our experiences with H&W was that their competitors were mostly the opposite in those days. As well as sometimes shoddy work, almost inevitably the workers tended to go on strike a few weeks before delivery - so that they would have maximum impact. That may have been a good idea in the short term but it was also a major reason for the death of Britain's shipbuilding industry, as ship owners went abroad to get guaranteed delivery dates. Post-war gloom.
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  #34  
Old 11th August 2019, 08:26
harry t. harry t. is online now
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'a bit of hard work never done anyone harm'

‘The burns and lairds steel boat’ to H&W discharged 700/1100 tons in less than a day. It took 3 days at Cammell Lairds. Until containerisation in the late sixties the ‘low’ dockers in Belfast or Dublin averaged 50 plus tons per hour against Liverpool’s 8, Glasgow’s 5, loading/discharging general cargoes. Simply, they weren’t afraid of a bit of hard work.

until this year this is typical of the work they had in hand http://www.harland-wolff.com/ plus the short vid. attached
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Last edited by harry t.; 11th August 2019 at 12:16.. Reason: additional info
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  #35  
Old 11th August 2019, 16:41
harry t. harry t. is online now
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from the ‘horse’s mouth’

Quote:
Originally Posted by searover View Post
a major reason for the death of Britain's shipbuilding industry
an interesting insight from this part of an interview given by Sir John Parker

https://youtu.be/9ozgyoMAp3Y
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  #36  
Old 11th August 2019, 18:47
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Great interview video Harry T. Thanks. It supports what was only just my personal experience at the time. I'll use three-legged stools in future.
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  #37  
Old 11th August 2019, 19:44
harry t. harry t. is online now
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Shipbuilding in the UK today

Glad you enjoyed ‘searover’, he’s a straight talker, diplomatic, but if you ‘pick the bones’ from his full interview, Westminster and the Scottish governments’ called the shots and were the final arbitrators of shipbuilding, as it is today.
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  #38  
Old 11th August 2019, 21:30
Engine Serang Engine Serang is offline  
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Sea Quest was the biggest three-legged stool ever and launching it was a huge gamble.
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  #39  
Old 12th August 2019, 00:55
Winmar Winmar is offline  
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Thanks for that Searover. I think the criticisms of corporate lethargy could have been made across the whole of our manufacturing sector but I cannot recall accusations of badly made product directed at H&W or certainly not to the extent that other yards have come under fire.
There are some that would say that the Titanic wasn't exactly a glowing endorsement for British shipbuilding! A more bigoted outfit you would never find. Glad they are gone, they would never employ a Catholic at one time.
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  #40  
Old 12th August 2019, 02:15
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Well her sister Olympic had a long and productive life. As for employment practices I agree their attitude was deplorable and indefensible.
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  #41  
Old 12th August 2019, 11:56
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I had an uncle who worked in H and W in the 1930s as a stager. He was RC. Aparently they employed catholics in the more menial jobs but not usually as tradesmen. This was, he reckoned down to the unions and the workforce ifself, not the management. H and W had a big shiprepair business in Liverpool and there was no religious discrimination there.
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  #42  
Old 12th August 2019, 13:24
Brian Dobbie Brian Dobbie is offline  
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I was in H&W 10/85 till 2/86 when Blue Star built the English Star class of refrigerated ships.
The ships were well enough built but the layout of the Engine Room could have been better. I think H&W and BSL were coming to the end by then as the ships had some very old fashioned gear on them, DC Cranes, DC Windlass and mooring winches. No central cooling in the Engine Room.
I think these ships were the last refrigerated cargo ships built in the UK.
Sad to see H&W go under but almost inevitable particularly as we don't have a British MN anymore.
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  #43  
Old 13th August 2019, 05:02
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Quote:
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. Glad they are gone, they would never employ a Catholic at one time.
Ireland - a beautiful land and peoples with a painful history. Religion has so many persecutions and deaths on its hands. As a Limey, I'm horrified at our part in this history.
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  #44  
Old 2nd October 2019, 12:27
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Things may be looking up

https://www.theguardian.com/business...6m-rescue-deal
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  #45  
Old 2nd October 2019, 17:22
granty granty is offline  
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Great news all the best to all at HW
Granty
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  #46  
Old 13th December 2019, 19:07
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Re previous comment about Ferguson's, Port Glasgow:
Quote:
nationalisation of the yard was rubber-stamped on Monday
https://www.greenocktelegraph.co.uk/...ons-finalised/
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  #47  
Old 13th December 2019, 19:36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winmar View Post
There are some that would say that the Titanic wasn't exactly a glowing endorsement for British shipbuilding! A more bigoted outfit you would never find. Glad they are gone, they would never employ a Catholic at one time.
A very long time ago, John Hastie & Co Ltd, steering gear manufacturers, Greenock, had a similar reputation.

A joke went:
RC Engineer applicant: (Crossing himself) "Any starts for engineers?"
Hastie foreman: (Miming playing LOL flute) Sorry, son, nothin' the day!"

I don't normally do virtue signalling but I remember the LOL band stopping outside St Mary's RC Church in Patrick Street to give them the benefit of their philharmonic skills. Even as a little Prod, I disapproved.
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  #48  
Old 14th December 2019, 08:10
harry t. harry t. is online now
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There are some that would say that the Titanic wasn't exactly a glowing endorsement for British shipbuilding! A more bigoted outfit you would never find. Glad they are gone, they would never employ a Catholic at one time.
Not many yards can claim some of their work was still trading on the high seas 75 years after launching, such as the Germanic, sister of the Britannic (1875). She had an illustrious career with British, American, Canadian and Turkish owners thru’ two world wars until October 1950.
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  #49  
Old 20th December 2019, 21:06
harry t. harry t. is online now
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the first not to be provided with a suit of sails in case of engine breakdown.

Teutonic and Majestic (Yard No. 209) were the first ships to be built with an annual subsidy from the British Admiralty so that in time of war or national emergency they could be quickly converted into armed merchant cruisers. Designed by Alexander M. Carlisle, Teutonic was the first twin-screw vessel constructed for the White Star Line and the first not to be provided with a suit of sails in case of engine breakdown. Both ships broke records but Majestic proved the faster of the sisters.

Queens Island, 144 years later, still in business
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  #50  
Old 20th December 2019, 21:33
OilJiver OilJiver is offline  
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Great picture of Teutonic in dock Harry. Thanks.
Re the sails; I guess 2 shafts, 2 x Triple Exp Engines & multiple boilers might promote a fair bit of confidence, even back then. (plenty bunker capacity maybe!)
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