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  #201  
Old 13th February 2020, 12:17
John Gowers John Gowers is offline
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Found the photo but no idea how to attach it to a posting. In the photo are Gerry Morrison and Davie Woods (3/Es) and Finley MacIver 3/M. Anyone know how to add an attachment to a posting.
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  #202  
Old 13th February 2020, 15:39
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Hit the 'Post reply' button under a message.

Add some text (eg subject, description, whatever) - in the box that appears

Hit the wee paper clip icon on the toolbar, above the text box

In the next wee (Manage Attachments) window that pops up

Hit a 'Choose' file button - then navigate to the image file on your PC/device. Usually will be a jpg file.

Upload.
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Last edited by airds; 13th February 2020 at 15:46..
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  #203  
Old 13th February 2020, 20:45
John Gowers John Gowers is offline
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Hi Guys this is the photo form 1975
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  #204  
Old 13th February 2020, 21:00
John Gowers John Gowers is offline
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Sorry Airds I did not thank you in the last post. So thanks for the advice on attachments. Here is a photo the Arctic Troll bar and the Sir John Hunter sorry about the quality of the SJH photo. I was on that ship three times under different names Kona and Cast Kittiwake.
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File Type: jpg Arctic Troll.jpg (154.6 KB, 37 views)
File Type: jpg Sir John Hunter.jpg (287.6 KB, 39 views)
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  #205  
Old 13th February 2020, 22:30
Irvingman Irvingman is online now  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Gowers View Post
Sorry Airds I did not thank you in the last post. So thanks for the advice on attachments. Here is a photo the Arctic Troll bar and the Sir John Hunter sorry about the quality of the SJH photo. I was on that ship three times under different names Kona and Cast Kittiwake.
The lad at the front with the denim waistcoat looks like one of the Denholm Engineer Cadet intake of 1973 with me - I think!! Was he Dougie?
John.
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  #206  
Old 14th February 2020, 08:49
John Gowers John Gowers is offline
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No sorry its not Dougie, that guy was a steward from Sandyhills in Glasgow think his name was Iain but not sure. The big guy with the pint was 'Jan the Cran', he was Dutch and sailed as crane engineer on a few of the Troll boats. Can't remember the rest of the guys names.
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  #207  
Old 14th February 2020, 15:34
P.Arnold P.Arnold is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Gowers View Post
On the Eurofreighter that was a regular thing wearing the bar stool covers I believe they were made by someones wife and there was matching tartan curtains. I have a photo somewhere of one bar night with all the covers being worn if I find it I will post it.
John
During 1976 drydocking of Eurofreighter in Falmouth, Rab Fraser, Ronnie Keir and others used to sport T shirts emblazoned with Mick Jagger type lips and a big red tongue with the motif, “BFO SUCKS”.

Sorry, a little off topic. No change there!
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  #208  
Old 15th February 2020, 06:41
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Originally Posted by P.Arnold View Post
During 1976 drydocking of Eurofreighter in Falmouth, Rab Fraser, Ronnie Keir and others used to sport T shirts emblazoned with Mick Jagger type lips and a big red tongue with the motif, “BFO SUCKS”.

Sorry, a little off topic. No change there!
Beat Frequency Oscillator?
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  #209  
Old 15th February 2020, 08:57
duncs duncs is online now  
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I do cryptic crosswords, maybe it's an anagram. Maybe boss was not a nice person.
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  #210  
Old 15th February 2020, 11:08
P.Arnold P.Arnold is online now
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Beat Frequency Oscillator?
Blended Fuel Oil

Basically it was the homogenising of fuel and water before squirting the combination into the turbines.

To get to that point there were numerous ‘washing’, De emulsifying, vanadium inhibitors, settling tanks, etc etc. At that time in Falmouth, I believe it wasn’t perceived to be the most popular system.

Come on ‘engineers’ help me out here.

PS, this was possibly a rare occasion when oil & water mixed, if you get my drift.
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  #211  
Old 15th February 2020, 11:25
John Gowers John Gowers is offline
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BFO as you say was blended fuel oil. The reason for using it was that normal Gas turbine fuel was getting too expensive so they started using cheaper heavier dirtier fuel but that had to go through various process's onboard so that it would burn in a Pratt and Whitney engine. It also had a tendency to burn out engines and was a nightmare for the engineers.

On the T-shirts the best one I heard of was on the Cast boats it said "CAST is last" on the front and "Think fast leave CAST" on the back
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  #212  
Old 15th February 2020, 11:48
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Varley Varley is offline   SN Supporter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P.Arnold View Post
Blended Fuel Oil

Basically it was the homogenising of fuel and water before squirting the combination into the turbines.

To get to that point there were numerous ‘washing’, De emulsifying, vanadium inhibitors, settling tanks, etc etc. At that time in Falmouth, I believe it wasn’t perceived to be the most popular system.

Come on ‘engineers’ help me out here.

PS, this was possibly a rare occasion when oil & water mixed, if you get my drift.
You have done very well without a plumber's assistance. I would only add that the washing was to remove salt (there had also been trouble in early life with salt in the intake air) salt and vanadium together made a much bigger problem than either alone and that the water left from the washing procedure caused the engineers a real pain as I was too much for the purifiers to cope with without intensive attention - no more UMS until the last few months when reverted to MGT 7.

("Oil and water mixed". VG that man!)
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  #213  
Old 15th February 2020, 12:28
duncs duncs is online now  
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I sailed with a C/E, Phil Thirlaway, I think was his name. He'd spent a lot of time on the gas boats. He put it more bluntly. They were trying to burn water to save on avgas fuel.
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  #214  
Old 15th February 2020, 13:35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duncs View Post
They were trying to burn water to save on avgas fuel.
Combined STEAM/GAS !

Does anyone remember the name 'BELCO DISTILATE'? This fuel was used on the GTVs. There is a company of this name and I seem to remember they made the blend or system to 'burn' the water and gas'.
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  #215  
Old 15th February 2020, 14:12
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I sailed with a C/E, Phil Thirlaway, I think was his name. He'd spent a lot of time on the gas boats. He put it more bluntly. They were trying to burn water to save on avgas fuel.
Phil was one of my Chiefs on Eurofreighter. I think the word we used was blunter than that, 'sh1t' to be exact. A steam man would have known that steam/exploding water droplets improves atomisation and therefore the flame at the burner. Same-same P&W Gas generators when trying the burn said sh1t. I can't remember if the vanadium inhibitor was injected before or after the homogeniser (before makes sense). Steamship Boilers were not immune from sodium vanadate corrosive 'clinker' either but it was not as fatal when condensing on screen tubes as it was on turbine blades/nozzles or not as rapidly so anyway (here we do need plumbers. I think it has been tried in Dr. Rudolph's stone crushing contraptions too).

Phil infuriated one of my Oppos, Mike Webster. The Chief would try and do electrical things with his small screwdriver. I was more sanguine, "You fuckit Chief, it's your ticket not mine" (like, I hope, all of them I got on well with Phil and he was, if I remember correctly, the one who recommended me to both the office and myself as E/O as well as telling me I drank too much. Anyway I was big headed enough to think I could sort it afterwards regardless). It was he, on one Christmas day, that reported to whoever was duty man ashore (Davy Hogg?) that we had had a fire in the stbd boiler. He was distinctly unimpressed with the "Isn't that where you are supposed to have fires, Chief?" reply.
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  #216  
Old 15th February 2020, 16:04
John Gowers John Gowers is offline
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Anyone remember blowing crushed walnut shells into the plenum chamber this happened once when I was on the Euroliner. It was supposed to help clean the blades. If I remember we went full speed and blow them in with some something that looked like a sand blasting machine. Never made the slightest difference so was never done again. But it did look pretty at night as you got a load of what looked liked fireworks coming out of the funnel.

There was a story that a captain wanted to see how the engineers water washed the engines to clean off the sea salt. This was done by standing in the plenum while the engine were run up on the starter but with no fuel. The story goes he slipped and dropped his brightstar torch which bounced as he tried to grab it and it went through the engines. Don't know if this was true or just a urban myth.

Found some more old photos of the Eurofreighter
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File Type: jpg Eurofreighter 2.jpg (98.9 KB, 19 views)
File Type: jpg Eurofreighter1.jpg (103.5 KB, 17 views)
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  #217  
Old 15th February 2020, 16:14
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I am sure it was true. On a subsequent trip, Brighstar well secured by lanyard was informing himself as to what was being inspected in one gearbox. Bending over, his keys slipped out of the top pocket. Fortunately there was a plumber small enough to retrieve them.

Here we praise Gas Turbines and you post a picture of the bloody Paxman.

(Walnut shells were not a novel medium for cleaning gas turbines. I'd like to remember the reason the ships didn't do it. I can't say I ever noticed a difference after water washing either except when it came to passing water through the manifold. That could precipitate it needing to be changed !)
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  #218  
Old 15th February 2020, 20:28
duncs duncs is online now  
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Re the torch incident, it's true. The late Kevin Hargin was bosun at the time and was present. He told me about it.
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  #219  
Old 15th February 2020, 21:08
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If we are talking about the torch incident, might have been EUROFREIGHTER. Master was Ian Graham. They way I was told was different. The covers of the intakes, high up on the after superstructure, the big square intakes.... one each side. A riding crew was on board fitting 'demisters' to be fit to prevent salt coming down the vents. The original grills were being taken down and the new grills would be fitted. Old Man and Cheng went out to see the work. The ship was running full speed. Old Man's was holding onto the railing and the torch slipped from his hand and dropped 100 ft down and into the compressor.

Euroliner arrived at Weehawken a week after the event. Lots of small pieces are 'scrap' on the dock. Those were the smashed blades from the Eurofreighter. I sailed with Ian some years later in Loch Maree. I knew about the torch, but I decided not to offer any other information.



Stephen
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  #220  
Old 15th February 2020, 21:54
Irvingman Irvingman is online now  
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Was only on Eurofreighter for two months as Cadet first with a 4/E who was an ex RN photographic technician and was going doolally, then a 4/E who claimed to be the only sane person on board - he could prove that as he had a discharge certificate from a psychiatric hospital!
I do remember that the fuel valve used to change from MGT/7 to BFO was motor driven and occasionally used to oscillate/shudder rapidly, feeding alternate slugs of MGT/7 & BFO causing the engines to surge dramatically and the demister panels to vibrate violently within their frames. A real brown trouser moment if you were stood anywhere nearby.
Obviously needed a good lecky
John
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  #221  
Old 16th February 2020, 02:17
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Stephen, I doubt one could have been tooling along at 5.9 with the demisters 'open' and not have had I C Graham go with the torch (The walnuts, I guess, must have been done with the GG running but water washing was done turning it on the hydraulic starter).

That detail escapes my Im. A number of permissives/trips worked around the change to BFO but I am fairly sure that once tripped back to MGT7 changing back to sh1t had to be manually switched.

Last edited by Varley; 16th February 2020 at 02:19..
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  #222  
Old 16th February 2020, 06:53
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[QUOTE=Varley;3031325]Stephen, I doubt one could have been tooling along at 5.9 with the demisters 'open' and not have had I C Graham go with the torch (The walnuts, I guess, must have been done with the GG running but water washing was done turning it on the hydraulic starter).

QUOTE]


At sea?
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  #223  
Old 16th February 2020, 10:52
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I can't remember, Stephen. No reason why not except for palaver unclutching spinning back up and then reversing the process.

The only time I remember for sure the plenum chamber door open at sea was after we had a GG trip when burning sh1t. Considerable amount carried over and must have pooled in the hot section. On trying to light-off again half the TT7s climbed towards full scale and the others remained too cold to make tea. The light off was aborted but the GG continued to turn 'slowly' but still 'lit'. Both emergency fuel shut offs were activated (the first time I saw either of them operated) to no effect. In the end it was 'unlit' by allowing the protective 'blank' for the spare GG to be sucked onto the nose cone and then fire extinguishers used into the gap. Can't remember if Asialiner or Eurofreighter but John Benn was Chief. On this occasion he was wrong and took some more than gentle persuading from New York for him to consider trying to light it off again. A boroscoping showed it to be as clean as a whistle and it ran as far as Greenock where the oil seals (presumably weakened by the 'fire') failed and we had LubOil gushing out of the precipitators.

I guess we must also have changed out at sea (so obviously plenum open). I don't remember doing so, for obvious reasons that would not have been done if it could have been put off until alongside.

Last edited by Varley; 16th February 2020 at 10:55..
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  #224  
Old 16th February 2020, 11:12
John Gowers John Gowers is offline
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Water washing was done in port, if I remember usually in New York and LeHavre. Unless we were slow steaming with one engine and it could be done at sea.

There was a nice incident that happened on either the Euroliner or Eurofrieghter can't remember which one I was on at the time. In Germany a container jammed in the cell guides and was literally ripped out by the crane. This ripped opened the container and damaged the cell guides so some of the cargo fell out into the hold. The container was full of Lowenbrau beer. There was no time to clean out the hold so this was done by the crew on the way to New York. It was a case of all hands turned to and we salvaged enough beer to last all the crew and officers for about 6 weeks.

On a different incident the photos below show a crane, in Norfolk I think, which fell across the Euroliner. I think a container jammed again and the crane was pulled down on to the ship.
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File Type: jpg img607.jpg (161.3 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg img841.jpg (151.6 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg img842.jpg (133.9 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg img845.jpg (148.6 KB, 6 views)
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  #225  
Old 16th February 2020, 11:33
duncs duncs is online now  
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I didn't sail on the gas boats, and can't make head nor tail of the mumbo jumbo re the jet engines!
I sailed for a spell on the 'Seatrain Saratoga' and heard plenty stories regarding the GTVs.
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