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  #1  
Old 22nd October 2014, 17:24
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A question

The way that use a screw driver attach on the machine part, then judge the performance of the machine via listening the noise conducted by the screw driver...what is the name of this tool? A listening needle? or A acoustics needle / bar?
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  #2  
Old 22nd October 2014, 17:33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saltysailor View Post
The way that use a screw driver attach on the machine part, then judge the performance of the machine via listening the noise conducted by the screw driver...what is the name of this tool? A listening needle? or A acoustics needle / bar?
A stethascope works better
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  #3  
Old 22nd October 2014, 17:45
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I once heard it referred to as an engine trumpet. Usually a long thin bar, sharpened at one end, trasitioning to a bend creating a handle and a rounded termination that fits snugly in the ear. A wonderful piece of kit!
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Old 22nd October 2014, 17:49
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Originally Posted by Derek Roger View Post
A stethascope works better
Thank you Derek.

Wonder if this is still a practice on board the ships, as my last few ships I saw all the engineers were wearing the earmuffs in the engine room.

I mean, as for example of the Morse code, the Morse code on telegraph transmission has already outdated, but the Morse code used by the lights still act as an back up in the communication...the stechascope is a kind of Morse code telegraph or Morse code light?
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  #5  
Old 22nd October 2014, 17:51
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Originally Posted by makko View Post
I once heard it referred to as an engine trumpet. Usually a long thin bar, sharpened at one end, trasitioning to a bend creating a handle and a rounded termination that fits snugly in the ear. A wonderful piece of kit!
Thank you Makko. Yes, the shape is what I recalled too, and the Chinese name is "Listening Needle", as direct translate.

Last edited by Saltysailor; 22nd October 2014 at 17:54.. Reason: sentence missed
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  #6  
Old 22nd October 2014, 18:22
surfaceblow surfaceblow is offline  
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I had to make a few of them since they seem to have legs. I never had a name for the device. I last used one in 2004 the year I retired.

Joe
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  #7  
Old 22nd October 2014, 18:27
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I would refer to it as a 'listening stick' or 'listening rod'
That is the names given to a larger version used by water supply companies to detect leaks.

Their kit used to be just a rod with a hardwood or Bakelite cup at the top which is held to the ear while the other end is placed on a valve or unenclosed pipe.
Nowadays they have more high-tech versions with an amplifier and a headset.
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  #8  
Old 22nd October 2014, 19:30
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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I had a bloke using one of those whizz bang gadgets to find a water leak a few months ago. After he located the leak, the plumber broke up a paved footpath only to find the leak wasn't there! Waste of space and very expensive. If I'd dug down where I thought the leak was i would have found it and not ended up with a busted up path to fix. That's what happens when you listen to experts.

John T
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  #9  
Old 22nd October 2014, 20:07
KEITHMAR KEITHMAR is offline  
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If You were paying Trotter,the Bloke should have dug where YOU wanted and NOT where H e thought ,sounds like money down the drain My son! .............And a good comment for the CURMUDGEON CLUB???Regards KEITHMAR.........I ve just Retilled my kitchen floor (Between the cooking area and the dining area and we chose a nice 2"inch wide tile to enbrass the the two colour schemes ,All went well until a few months after it was finished when My wifes 10 Yr old, niece came to visit, "Why is that tile upside down, Tia?..and on very close inspection ,not just"ONE"HALF the FRIGGIN ROW was upside down So YES I know the feeling!!!!........We never spotted it of course! ...KM:
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  #10  
Old 22nd October 2014, 23:39
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re: That's what happens when you listen to experts.

2000 I had my original circa 1952 clay tile sewer outfall replaced with plastic. Before hand I hired a company to tell me where it was. They put a video camera with another electronic device on the end of a sewer snake then ran it down the pipe.

With another electronic device they marked the path of my sewer. When the contractor dug it up we found that at the street they had missed the location by 100 feet. They also provided me with a VHS video tape showing going in and coming back out. Which after watching it I felt it was useless. They charged $200, replacing the whole thing cost $1,200.

Greg Hayden
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  #11  
Old 22nd October 2014, 23:58
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Keithmar: "If You were paying Trotter,the Bloke should have dug where YOU wanted and NOT where H e thought ,sounds like money down the drain My son!"

You've got that right, Dad! Trouble is, if you've just paid $200 for a bloke to find the leak, you're a bit keen to believe him. In retrospect, I should have got one of those deviners with a bent stick.

John T

PS probably your niece noticed the upside down tlle because her head is closer to the floor, taller grown ups may not notice ... maybe.

Last edited by trotterdotpom; 23rd October 2014 at 00:00..
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  #12  
Old 23rd October 2014, 03:48
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All,

I spoke with my Dad earlier - 50's Odyssey Works and Blue Flue. He said "Stethescope"!

Now, he also mentioned, seeing as it had to do with listening and remembering that during his "time" he probably worked on every class of BF ship including a Scotts' Still engine, he was told that upon entering the engine room with a steam up and downer to "listen for the canaries", i.e. mechanical lubricators! Maybe some of you old steam men will remember.

Rgds.
Dave
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  #13  
Old 23rd October 2014, 06:03
G0SLP G0SLP is offline  
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The old 'use a long screwdriver as a stethoscope' trick still has its uses - it's interesting to watch the reactions of young engineers, curious as to what the old Chief is up to as he's checking over running machinery that he's not totally happy with...
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  #14  
Old 23rd October 2014, 09:52
OilJiver OilJiver is offline  
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Originally Posted by G0SLP View Post
The old 'use a long screwdriver as a stethoscope' trick still has its uses - ......
Definitely. I've always called it a listening stick, as does Mad Landsman (#7).

Works just as well (and in some cases better), when pressed against your ear defender.
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  #15  
Old 23rd October 2014, 10:40
JT McRae JT McRae is offline  
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That's right OilJiver, wearing earmuffs actually make using the listening rod (or long screwdriver) even more effective. And yes, the younger engineers think the old Chief may be a bit loopy!
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  #16  
Old 23rd October 2014, 18:13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G0SLP View Post
The old 'use a long screwdriver as a stethoscope' trick still has its uses - it's interesting to watch the reactions of young engineers, curious as to what the old Chief is up to as he's checking over running machinery that he's not totally happy with...
Used one at work the otherday to hear if a totally enclosed pump was running and fitter looked at me as if I had two heads!
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  #17  
Old 23rd October 2014, 20:50
retfordmackem retfordmackem is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saltysailor View Post
The way that use a screw driver attach on the machine part, then judge the performance of the machine via listening the noise conducted by the screw driver...what is the name of this tool? A listening needle? or A acoustics needle / bar?
Call it what you like, it certainly worked Bit like the old fashioned trumpets for the hard of hearing .
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  #18  
Old 23rd October 2014, 21:47
KEITHMAR KEITHMAR is offline  
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London expression, Sorry Trotter no offence.intended ! and Yes you are right on both counts Bloody annoying though!Regards KM
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  #19  
Old 23rd October 2014, 23:05
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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London expression, Sorry Trotter no offence.intended ! and Yes you are right on both counts Bloody annoying though!Regards KM
No offence taken, Keith ... I was just kidding.

John T
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  #20  
Old 23rd October 2014, 23:19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trotterdotpom View Post
Keithmar: "If You were paying Trotter,the Bloke should have dug where YOU wanted and NOT where H e thought ,sounds like money down the drain My son!"

You've got that right, Dad! Trouble is, if you've just paid $200 for a bloke to find the leak, you're a bit keen to believe him. In retrospect, I should have got one of those deviners with a bent stick.

John T

PS probably your niece noticed the upside down tlle because her head is closer to the floor, taller grown ups may not notice ... maybe.
Get a wire caothanger, make two L shaped things of it, hold one in each hand so they can swing and walk over the place you want to detect. When you are over the pipe/drain the two wires will cross. I have used this with success 3 real problem times, and quite a few times just for laughs. Every time it was needed, it worked. Don't believe or not, it works.
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  #21  
Old 23rd October 2014, 23:32
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Just noticed I spelled "divine" wrongly on my earlier post. i think "devining" is removing the "sh1tshute" from prawns.

Curious to know how the coat hangers detect the location of a leak when there is water the full length of the pipe - anyway I'm going to give the method a try and will report back.

John T
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  #22  
Old 24th October 2014, 03:22
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All,

Thank you for the comments which I got a very good answer.
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  #23  
Old 24th October 2014, 04:36
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re: Get a wire coathanger ...

I have tried divining myself without ever being successful. Yet I have known people who are good at it, my next door neighbor being one. Once upon a time where I worked we were looking for a sewer pipe fifty feet down. After trying modern methods to no avail, one of my guys found it with a pair of bent coat hangers. Digging down it was right where he said it was.

Greg Hayden
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  #24  
Old 24th October 2014, 14:00
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trotterdotpom View Post
Just noticed I spelled "divine" wrongly on my earlier post. i think "devining" is removing the "sh1tshute" from prawns. John T
Tut,tut, Mr. TDP - The word concerning prawns is deVEINING. The same word is used for "cleaning" chiles and peppers.

Rgds.
Sensai
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  #25  
Old 24th October 2014, 14:38
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Oh no, I did it again. Arigato sensei. Just curious, how are las gambas in Mexico? Downunder they're so big you need a coathanger to de-vein them.

John T
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