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Ships GM question.

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  #51  
Old 27th July 2019, 19:01
harry t. harry t. is offline
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Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1953 - 1987
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 328
GM – Theoretical Stability, good practice and carelessness.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen J. Card View Post
Try YouTube. Several good clips 'stability'. Two or three are EXCELLENT. Others are so bad the lecturers should be sacked! Good graphics too.
On a coastwise passage with relieving deck and engineering officers, the ship had arrived that morning and was expected to sail again that evening, but there was a problem. On the chief officer’s ‘hand over notes’, he had left instructions to insist on full FW, bunkering all of the F.O. DB’S, hardening the settling tanks, ballasting and pressing up the deep tanks before completion of discharge at that port. The technical department was concerned the bunkers and barge would cost more at this port and had got the builders naval architects to double check the chief officer’s calculations. In the meantime, he had been brought back from his leave to further explain these instructions, but the builders two naval architects had already won the argument. The relieving captain then insisted the chief officer stay for the short passage to the next port. He refused, and was told by the owners, menacingly, to ‘go home, and await their further instructions’. That evening he got an urgent telephone call from the owners, - the lady was now on her “beam ends”, in neutral equilibrium. Two tugs ordered on departure were holding her hard to the quay, as she just fell over when they let the after ropes go. As she heeled, one of the mast trucks had crashed through a window of Ranks flour mill. It later transpired the shipbuilder’s men had used the metacentric height from their drawings, on the light ship draft, not from the actual ship draft as per the chief officer’s calculations.
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  #52  
Old 28th July 2019, 08:54
Avraham Ariel Avraham Ariel is offline  
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Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1951 - 2005
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 23
I salute that mate.

I am told only few like him exist nowadays.
That story reminds me of the poem THE MATE that I framed on my office wall when I was a chief Officer in the 1950s. Colleagues can find it on the web by googling "If the ship begins to roll" in inverted commas.
It was adopted by many individuals and groups.
For example see:
http://pmma2006.blogspot.com/2010/11/call-mate.html

Does anybody know who the author was?
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  #53  
Old 28th July 2019, 20:55
harry t. harry t. is offline
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Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1953 - 1987
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avraham Ariel View Post
That story reminds me of the poem THE MATE that I framed on my office wall when I was a chief Officer
Hello Avraham, The poem is the “Fall Guy” (Anonymous Kings Point Alumnus) from a book - A Doghouse Tale, by Bert Oldenhuis.
- further to the earlier post;

The C/O re-joined in Glasgow, no doubt he was surprised to find his cabin full to busting with dignitaries. The port captain had been deputised to read out the ‘charge sheet’, one item only, two gangs working No.2 hatch paid double time (a minimum of 4 hours pay each) to retrieve a few mail bags that had dropped through the un-butted ends of some bundled coffin boards weeks earlier. After a pause, the mate reminded those present the ship had loaded at seventeen US and Canadian Great Lake ports, not counting diversions on account of a national strike in Canada before arriving in Glasgow, where she discharged a large consignment of precious metals and the largest consignment of mail ever to cross the Atlantic. For by the profit there was the free publicity and not as much as a thank you from the owners – ‘so what’s this bitching about?’. The port super later admitted it was at the owner’s insistence, he gives the chief officer “a dressing down”, - to put him in his place. The following voyage, the C/O was ‘kicked upstairs’.
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Last edited by harry t.; 29th July 2019 at 07:07.. Reason: additional info
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