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  #26  
Old 5th December 2006, 16:09
TangoVictor TangoVictor is offline  
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Hello
I have just come across this forum and recognised a few names from my deck cadetship with Houlder Bros in the early seventies.
I sailed on the Clerk-Maxwell joining her in Barcelona on 29.07.74 and leaving in Rio Grande del Sol on 30.11.74. My fellow deck cadet at this time was Derek Winning and I remember Mike Dale as the Ch.Off with Les Cuttress as Master. Gas tankers or any other tankers were definately not for me although I did enjoy my time on the Black Pig with raucous nights in the bar singing "Out in the west Texas town of El Paso". Ships like the Hardwicke Grange settled my career direction hence my move to Cunard as soon as I completed my cadetship.
During my voyage we took the first cargo of Butadienne (sorry about spelling) from Antwerp to Galveston. Spent most of the six hour compressor watches venting off. Then we were towed off the berth by fire wires when a rail tanker exploded. The effects of Butadiane coming into contact with air and the rail cars being shunted had not been explained.
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  #27  
Old 31st December 2006, 18:15
non descript non descript is offline
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Butadiene and the Fiery Kipper

I’m afraid to say that “venting off” was a major part of the cargo operation on many of the Fiery Kipper fleet – the reliquifaction plants on board these ships were seldom up to the task. Your marginal concern over exposure to butadiene was well founded; viz: at acute high exposure, damage to the central nervous system will start to occur. Symptoms such as distorted blurred vision, vertigo, general tiredness, decreased blood pressure, headache, nausea, decreased pulse rate, and fainting may be witnessed. As the exposure to butadiene occurs at a higher level and for a longer duration, the effects witnessed will become more serious.

So there we are... there’s a moral there somewhere.
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  #28  
Old 31st December 2006, 22:17
Les_Blues Les_Blues is offline
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Tango, were you on the CM the same time as me. I paid off in the Rio Grand. We were bussed up to Rio from where we were flown home the next day. I was on the CM for 8 months, joined her in Santos after flying out to Sao Paulo from where we got a taxi on a long drive to Santos. We did indeed dock at Barcelona on that trip where we saw the Royston Grange tied up after being towed across the Atlantic. I loved the CM, bar the amonia fumes. Minititlan was a strange place, if I remember rightly we were stuck there for 2 or 3 weeks. There were a couple more ports we visitted on the Minititlan river, barring spelling mistakes they were Nanchital and Cuotsacoulcus. I met an ex merchant seaman recently who was amazed I had been to Cuotsacoulcus, he thought he was the only person in the world to have been sent there.
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  #29  
Old 1st January 2007, 13:51
NINJA NINJA is offline  
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Clerk-Maxwell.

Hello Les Blues,

Well that makes three of us who have been to Coatzacolcos, spent a month on the Clerk-Maxwell running between Coatzacolalcos and Minatitlan, cannot say I agree with your comment that the "Black Max" was loveable.

A bit of useless info. when the yanks looked at building an alternative to the Panama Canal, they looked at using nukes to blast a cut from Coatzacoalcos to the Pacific.

Regards

Ninja.
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  #30  
Old 1st January 2007, 21:43
Les_Blues Les_Blues is offline
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Thanks for the Coatzacolcos spelling correction Tonga, now I can tell my grandchildren and their children that such places might be found on google, I wonder if its changed much?
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  #31  
Old 1st January 2007, 22:40
non descript non descript is offline
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Originally Posted by Les_Blues View Post
Thanks for the Coatzacolcos spelling correction Tonga, now I can tell my grandchildren and their children that such places might be found on google, I wonder if its changed much?
You're most welcome Les Blues, but it was actually Ninja.
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  #32  
Old 2nd January 2007, 21:47
Les_Blues Les_Blues is offline
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So it was, silly me!
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  #33  
Old 2nd January 2007, 21:55
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So it was, silly me!
No, not really - I do it frequently.
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  #34  
Old 3rd February 2008, 12:28
MARINEJOCKY MARINEJOCKY is offline  
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I was only on the Clerk-Maxwell for a number of weeks from 28-4-79 to 6-6-79 as 2nd engineer, joining in Pascagoula and leaving in Donaldsonville then I had to transfer to MY ship, the Cavendish.

Only a short time there but some great memories and I think my mother still has my old "I survived the Black Max" tee shirt.
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  #35  
Old 27th March 2008, 19:38
Ian MacD Ian MacD is offline  
 
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Derek C
I joined CM at Maracaibo in 1966 as 2/0 Captain Ron Hedger, Mate John Pope, other 2/0 Davy Horn, 3/0 Dave Garrard, C/E Derek ?, 2/E Vic Pegg and so on.
Hard working vessel, lots of teething problems but tremendous espirit de corps.

Clerk Maxwell was the first atmospheric gas tanker under the red ensign, however the first gas tanker was the 400 ton Avogadro which Houlders bought as their introduction to the gas business and as a training ground for those going to the then building Clerk Maxwell.
Regards
Ian

Last edited by Ian MacD; 27th March 2008 at 19:54..
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  #36  
Old 27th March 2008, 19:54
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duquesa duquesa is offline  
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clerk-maxwell

Knew Dave Horn. Last seen when Ch.Off out of Harwich with Sealink.
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  #37  
Old 27th March 2008, 20:02
Ian MacD Ian MacD is offline  
 
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Tonga,
Must respectfully disagree. As Mate of HUmboldt I loaded a cargo of Butadiene in Tokayama Japan 1969 without using the top tanks resulting in the other tanks being 99% full and the vapour super-saturated. Nevertheless pulled temperature down on passage to New Orleans from summer ambient temp to atmospheric temp. First few days were a nightmare. Regards Ian
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  #38  
Old 27th March 2008, 20:07
Ian MacD Ian MacD is offline  
 
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good shipmate Dave, as jolly as they come!

Did you sail on the old Duquesa? I boarded her a few times in BA when I was an apprentice on Oswestry Grange (a lovely fat old lady) in the early sixties.
Regards
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  #39  
Old 27th March 2008, 20:37
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Humboldt

Ian,
I totally agree with you, the Humboldt (being a pressure ship) was poetry in motion and I could never say a bad word against her. My earlier comment at # 27 “I’m afraid to say that “venting off” was a major part of the cargo operation on many of the Fiery Kipper fleet” was a gentle criticism of the atmospheric boat, Joule, which whilst a happy ship and a very good ship, was a nightmare in terms of re-liquifaction. It would have been both wiser and kinder for me to have written “...major part of the cargo operation on the Joule”...
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  #40  
Old 27th March 2008, 21:14
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duquesa duquesa is offline  
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Clerk-maxwell

Ian, yes indeed. One of the finest, if not the finest vessels I ever sailed on and with a crew to match. It was a bit of a wrench to be transferred to the Imperial Transport. That is probably a bit unfair as she too was a reasonably happy ship, but not in the same league. I'd been on her before and she was better first time around, probably due to the c/o, the brilliant Paddy Slevin.
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  #41  
Old 22nd May 2008, 11:56
Nova Scotian Nova Scotian is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian MacD View Post
Derek C
I joined CM at Maracaibo in 1966 as 2/0 Captain Ron Hedger, Mate John Pope, other 2/0 Davy Horn, 3/0 Dave Garrard, C/E Derek ?, 2/E Vic Pegg and so on.
Hard working vessel, lots of teething problems but tremendous espirit de corps.

Clerk Maxwell was the first atmospheric gas tanker under the red ensign, however the first gas tanker was the 400 ton Avogadro which Houlders bought as their introduction to the gas business and as a training ground for those going to the then building Clerk Maxwell.
Regards
Ian
Hi Ian:

I believe this is you taken aboard Clerk-Maxwell on Christmas Day 1967. Also attached is a picture of "Boxy" the Electrician and one of Peter Dunford, 3/0 and Tony Barras, Apprentice.

I dug them out from an old album hence the poor quality. There are other pictures of CM in my Gallery.

Regards

Nova Scotian
Attached Images
File Type: jpg MAC CM.jpg (38.4 KB, 74 views)
File Type: jpg BOXY.jpg (9.6 KB, 68 views)
File Type: jpg P AND T.jpg (36.2 KB, 83 views)
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  #42  
Old 22nd May 2008, 21:17
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marinero marinero is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian MacD View Post
Derek C
I joined CM at Maracaibo in 1966 as 2/0 Captain Ron Hedger, Mate John Pope, other 2/0 Davy Horn, 3/0 Dave Garrard, C/E Derek ?, 2/E Vic Pegg and so on.
Hard working vessel, lots of teething problems but tremendous espirit de corps.

Clerk Maxwell was the first atmospheric gas tanker under the red ensign, however the first gas tanker was the 400 ton Avogadro which Houlders bought as their introduction to the gas business and as a training ground for those going to the then building Clerk Maxwell.
Regards
Ian
hi Ian.
Sadly Vic Pegg now passed away a while back. I worked with him in the Offshore Office.
Regards
Leo
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  #43  
Old 22nd May 2008, 22:11
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hi Ian.
Sadly Vic Pegg now passed away a while back. I worked with him in the Offshore Office.
Regards
Leo
Sorry to hear about Vic Pegg, I think it was he who worked with me for days and nights helping rebuild the Sulzer Cargo Compressor on the Joule (both of us having to wear BA apparatus, because the compressor room was full of ammonia gas) - we finished we turned it on, went for a beer and then read the instruction book... Sadly, if we had done it in the other order, we might have come across the text in red which advised "After a rebuilt, always run the unit for a maximum of 20 minutes, then allow it to rest for 2 hours; failure to observe this rule will result in permanent damage to the compressor" .... It did and the result was quite spectacular (and expensive)
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  #44  
Old 21st June 2008, 23:33
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JOC42 JOC42 is offline
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Joined the "Mad Max" as R/O around '78 ( can't find the discharge book ;-(( )
Spent 6 months mainly in the Med - a very eventful trip!!
Superb memories of singing "Smoke gets in your eyes" in the bar along with other Platters songs... Had a major incident off the bay of Sidra (Libya) when a storm brewed and we were discharging onto a lighter bouy - lost the flukes off the anchor ... next stop Valetta, Malta to get the new anchor - couldn't go alongside as we were not gas free !!!
Les Cutriss was the Old Man and Chris Pawlyn, 1st mate from Mevagissey took over as old man - straight into a force 10 in Biscay - damaged the strakes and ended up with the company welder Tony (ex SAS??? ) drilling the cracks and welding in the containment spaces. I was looking after the fire hoses whilst a junior R/O (from South Shields - Alistair??) did the watches. Still have flashbacks of the welding gear and me with a firehose next to the gas cargo tanks ..... wait a minute??? .....
Ran aground on the Seine coming back from Rouen to Le Havre, way toooo much cargo... we were stopped in Le Havre by the French for discharging oily bilges in the channel on the way there ... hi tech Cessna flew over us and took photos, wrong ship though .... ;-(( We met Chris and his wife in the early 80's whilst on hols in Newquay but sadly two years later Chris died from throat cancer - a wonderful family man and my mate at sea!!!
Second mate on the Maxwell was John ?? with his wife. One of the engineers, he had his wife also - she was an ex nav cadet from Fleetwood.
Even stranger memories of the cook from Cape Verde - martial arts expert, floored my cabin steward in one round house kick .... whilst I had gone down to the crew bar to deliver a telegram. Cook then asked me to send a msg to HO asking to be relieved - on grounds of illness.
Hard to believe its so long ago - time marches on ....
Be good

John

Last edited by JOC42; 22nd June 2008 at 11:44..
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  #45  
Old 22nd June 2008, 14:20
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marinero marinero is offline  
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Hi John.
You are right about Chris being a lovely bloke. I sailed with him for quite a while on the Humboldt.
Regards
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  #46  
Old 22nd June 2008, 16:58
Hugh Thomas Hugh Thomas is offline  
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This is very strange loads of memories flooding back having stumbled across this site I did three trips on the Max 79/85/85-86 I think I was the last Houlder Brothers crew member onboard being the third engineer shutting down the AP Ruston Alternator for the last time, and leaving her for scrape in Aviles Spain. Our departure was delayed due to the scrape yard being unhappy with a load of Pig Iron in the bow that they hadn’t calculated for Oh and the ship bell was missing. With everyone paid off but I transferred directly to the Faraday. Many happy memories singing Elpaso, and smoke gets in your eyes.
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  #47  
Old 1st July 2008, 00:58
garwatts garwatts is offline  
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"the company welder Tony (ex SAS??? ) drilling the cracks and welding in the containment spaces"

John I seem to recall meeting the company welder on the Faraday - was he a scouser? I remember him being foolish enough to challenge the drinking prowess of Gary White the 'lecky......when we were in dry dock

Regards

Garry
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  #48  
Old 6th July 2008, 16:25
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JOC42 JOC42 is offline
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Hi Garry

Thats the fella - short stature, long dark hair and a 'tash ....

cheers

John
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  #49  
Old 9th July 2008, 21:28
Ian MacD Ian MacD is offline  
 
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Hi,

Good lord! I cannot believe I ever looked that young. Sorry for the delay in repling but I Hve ben on leave since the beginning of June and just got back.

I now recognise you and recall that you were quite tall. Dave Box and Tony Barras are exactly as I remember them, we all looked like kids. Probably the clean living and hard work.
Regards
Ian
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  #50  
Old 23rd August 2008, 10:33
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ChrisCampbell ChrisCampbell is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DerekC View Post
Kev, your right that is a great picture of the old C-M. I sailed on her around the early 70's, I have spent many a 'happy' hour in that compressor room, stripping down the goddam compressors. One trip we did down to BA lost 200 tonnes of cargo because the compressors threw their collective hand in...venting most of the way down. It was hell! but what a brilliant time we had overall on that ship. I haven't thought about her for a few years now but I will try and dredge up some names to share.

The mate was Mick...? My deck cadet buddy was Alan Barnes (Barney), Captain was...Pugh (I Think), sec was...can't recall, but good bloke anyway...as were all!

regards

DerekC
I Think you will find the mate was Mick Dale of "Out in the old west texas town of EL Paso " Fame I remember having some great nights in the bar
Regards Chris
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