Cerinthus = 1954 - 1976 - Page 3 - Ships Nostalgia
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Cerinthus = 1954 - 1976

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  #51  
Old 14th May 2007, 22:47
chadders chadders is offline  
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Cerinthus

I did my second trip on the Cerinthus, joined in Stanlow in March '69 Stan Jacobson was the Old Man a great guy and Geoff Caine was the mate. Went to Maracaibo and then did Maracaibo to the Plate for a while before coming back to the UK. A fine old lady despite the numerous leaks. I seem to remember the pumpman was Pearly Early and we also had a chinese laundryman. Also sailed on the Cymbeline on the N.E. Coast as mate in '78.
Saw a thread earlier about France Fenwick joined the Chelwood in 73 after 2nd Mates and did the Atlantic run to Port Arthur from Foynes, was also on her on the coast when she was the Oswestry Grange.
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  #52  
Old 15th May 2007, 10:34
veste veste is offline  
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I think the chinese laundry man may be Lee Sang, he was a permanent fixture on the Clymene/Cerinthus,when the ship stopped out went the fishing lines. He dried the fish on the laundry deck area then sent the fish home to the resturant in Leeds, what a character !. Like Peter Earle pumpman never to be forgotten.
Regards veste.
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  #53  
Old 24th May 2008, 21:06
Bombersman Bombersman is offline  
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Good evening veste.

"I think the chinese laundry man may be Lee Sang, he was a permanent fixture on the Clymene/Cerinthus"

Also a permanent feature on the Brandon Priory in the early 1960s

Kind regards

Bob W
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  #54  
Old 25th May 2008, 00:49
Cutsplice Cutsplice is online now  
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In respect to Captain Hutchinson ex Houlders/ Hadleys I remembr him doing a safety survey on a vessel I was on in Aberdeen the year at a guess i would think was 1988 or thereabouts. We got into a conversation about Houlders during a tea break during the survey, he appeared to me to be a real gentleman. Whether he was full time with the DTI at the time or not I can recall, I do recall his name for some reason or other, strangely I cannot remember many names of DTI inspectors.
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  #55  
Old 25th May 2008, 08:49
non descript non descript is offline
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From my own recollections of Captain Hutchinson I would totally agree, a perfect gentleman, very good at his job and dedicated. I wonder where he is now.
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  #56  
Old 5th August 2008, 20:09
paj paj is offline  
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hi all just having a look at thread on cerinthus. i joined her in rotterdam along with several others in october 1962. from there we went to denmark, sweden, back to uk including middelsbourgh, liverpool then to lehavre, marsielle. from there we went deep sea down to cape town, i seem to remember that took about 30 days. then round to lorenco marques and biera, across to bombay. ithink we spent xmas there. then on to borneo and singapore cant remember which was first.then we headed to australia and new zealand where we spent about 3 or 4 months traveling between geelong brisban, sydney melbourne wellington auckland and then we headed home via suez canal. did not pay off with a lot but what a great trip for a 16 year old. anybody else out there who was on this trip. i would like to hear from you. paj
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  #57  
Old 17th August 2008, 21:54
Les_Blues Les_Blues is offline
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I remember the Chinese laundryman on the Cerinthus but I don't thnk he was actually Chinese, If I remember rightly he was from Singapore. He was a mysterius guy, easily wound up but otherwise a gentleman. He came ashore with us to chinatown one night in (I think) Rotterdam and thoroughly enjoyed himself. He used to kick off with the saying "eelamakka". Thats the phonetic version, I've no idea how it's spelt, or what it means but I remember the guy using it frequently in the angry/irony mode. I did ask him once what "eelamakka" meant, and he did tell me but I can't remember so he must have given me a diplomatic reply. Bless him.
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  #58  
Old 20th August 2008, 16:56
Bombersman Bombersman is offline  
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Food shortage

I wonder if anyone is around who might remember a 3/E from Glasgow called Alec Gibb (Gibbering Gibb, Gibby) .

He was with me on my first trip as Jun eng on the Brandon Priory in 1961. "What has this got to do with the Cerinthus Bob?" I hear you cry. Well, Gibby had a good few tales to tell about his time on the Cerinthus but I particularly remember (and wonder if anyone is around who can confirm this) a tale about taking on stores. In Japan, the ship was told to take on stores to get to USA, but was to call at Singapore en route. Apparently the instruction was ignored in favour of taking stores at Singapore but the run in to Singapore was cancelled. This meant that on arrival at Ana Cortez the ship was reduced to cornflakes and water.

Gibby often chanted a song, it could hardly be called singing, which went something like this although the tune was difficult to place

"There’s a tanker coming in over there
The Cerinthus coming in over there
Though her food and water's gone
she still carries on
sailing in -to Ana Cortez"

Bob W.

Last edited by Bombersman; 20th August 2008 at 17:08..
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  #59  
Old 20th August 2008, 17:21
non descript non descript is offline
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Bob,
I think that story is highly likely; it is the sort of thing that the ship, and its very well meaning Owners, would easily fall foul of. They (HSC) have a slightly similar tale when their CUMBRIA was due to stop at Singapore and not only take on stores, but also send some of the crew home (for Christmas) and take on new crew members. The master, who shall remains nameless, decided for reasons of his own, to abandon the plan that the Owners and the Agents had so carefully put in place and steamed past the waiting supply boat at full speed, leaving an amazed crew bobbing about in its wake – and a rather upset crew standing on the main deck with their bags packed. Arriving at Goa a week later with little to eat was a less than perfect way to celebrate Christmas.

Mark
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  #60  
Old 20th August 2008, 18:25
Bombersman Bombersman is offline  
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Hi mark.

- and a rather upset crew standing on the main deck with their bags packed. Arriving at Goa a week later with little to eat was a less than perfect way to celebrate Christmas.

I can well believe it.

Kind regards

Bob
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  #61  
Old 21st August 2008, 20:32
ALAN TYLER ALAN TYLER is offline  
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Alan T

Quote:
Originally Posted by veste View Post
I think the chinese laundry man may be Lee Sang, he was a permanent fixture on the Clymene/Cerinthus,when the ship stopped out went the fishing lines. He dried the fish on the laundry deck area then sent the fish home to the resturant in Leeds, what a character !. Like Peter Earle pumpman never to be forgotten.
Regards veste.
I sailed with lee sang on the joya macance in 1969, still got his chinese cook book, great help in that department as a newly promoted chief cook. Also sailed with peter on the stolt tudor in 72/73. he really was a great character, oh happy days.
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  #62  
Old 13th December 2008, 21:24
malachy malachy is offline  
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think this is the chinese laundryman who was fishing while loading in the gulf (1972),someone threw a recently caught fish towards him and unbenown to him a barb from the fish went into his leg. By the time we got to Philidephia his leg was well infected and when the doctor came on board he just gouged the barb out, with no pain relief,and i think one of the AB's who was holding the laundryman fainted!!!sothey ended up carrying two out the Chief stewards room.
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  #63  
Old 15th December 2008, 11:06
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Fairfield Fairfield is offline
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I took a shot of her at Brigham's Drydock at South Shields in 1972 which is in the Gallery.
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  #64  
Old 29th December 2008, 04:10
Jon Vincent Jon Vincent is offline  
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Malachy. Back the original thread "Cerinthus". We must have been there at the same time. I joined in Sept 1971 at Tilbury and left at South Shields Dry-dock April 1972. I was second mate and had my wife on board through the time I was there. In that period we had Captains O"Kieffe and Charlesworth. Chief mates Tony Collop and Tony Moore, third mate Ian Mitchell and third engineer Willie Francis. The bit about going aground in Rio Grande del Sol was true, the vessel was over loaded and she always leaked, but she was carrying dirty diesel. The vessel was only fit to carry dirty oil cargo. To start with we did several trips with "WAX" from Antwerp to Stanlow. The ship was always going aground and my wife did the typing for both Captains as neither could type or spell, she got tired of typing "Dear Sirs, I regret to inform you that the vessel went aground" The "Cerinthus" rates as my all time worst voyages and ships, by todays standards it was not just in bad shape but appalling shape, well beyond her useful life. The vessel was unhappy, we had a bad "pool" crew (Liverpool) who stole the medical kits from the lifeboats amongst other things. A Captain who thought life had dealt him a duff hand after being in Royal Mail, and a Captain who was pissed at "Dennis" because he had been promised a "new Gas ship". We spent Christmas stuck in the ice alongside in "Bangor" Maine USA, with no water midship as all the pipe work on the flying bridge had burst. We had to land a cadet with "meningitis" who nearly died on us. The list goes on and on. I left the company after that and joined a major tanker company, spending years trying to forget that the "Cerinthus" ever happened. To this day I am amazed that we ever got from "A' to "B" and then even discharged a cargo which was always a tortuous process and not always successful..
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  #65  
Old 29th December 2008, 12:24
K urgess K urgess is offline
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Seems things had changed by the time I joined in 1973, Jon.
I have nothing but good memories of the old girl when Tony Moor was Master.
You're the only one I've heard had a bad experience. Just goes to show what changes when a different crew sails on a ship.
Plus I joined after the drydock which must've sorted most of the problems.
Off the cuff I'd say my link to the Cerinthus was stronger because she didn't have long to live.

Last edited by K urgess; 29th December 2008 at 13:40.. Reason: Spelling
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  #66  
Old 29th December 2008, 13:08
non descript non descript is offline
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The Missing Link

I can quite appreciate that not everyone enjoyed this curious ship, and whilst she holds the sobriquet of “The World’s Favourite Tanker” in some folk’s minds, there must have been times when the trade and the Master made a pleasant experience into a nightmare. Poor old Fubar, he will be forever mentally scarred by his link with the past. Such is the value of non-ferrous metals that there is little hope for him, but his soul will, in years to come, hover over Faslane …
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  #67  
Old 29th December 2008, 21:14
malachy malachy is offline  
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jon,
joined the Cerinthus in Curacao in feb '72 when they flew me and Willie out as reliefs.This was after a KLM "world tour" London, Amsterdam,Paris,Zurich,Madrid,Caracas, Curacao.When we arrived we were expecting to go straight on watch, but were taken to the Avila Beach(man-made beach) Hotel for three days to recover from the "jet-lag"!!!!(so thoughtful)
Willie(who I think was from Barnsley????) was on free beer for a couple of days as he entertained the American tourists with his stories and banter.
After all this we were back in Swansea in two weeks and after a rough trip back, I think we lost an anchor and forward hand rails.
From there went up to Stanlow, Birkenhead,Ardrrosan, across to Cobh and then just around stanlow and that coast until going into Brigham and Cowans in S Shields.
Do you remember k.k. wong who was a motor chief who was getting his steam time at the time,he was serving as 4th eng????????????
vinny
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  #68  
Old 30th December 2008, 03:05
Jon Vincent Jon Vincent is offline  
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Malachy. Willie and I are still very good friends, still go for a pint with him when in the UK, He still lives in Barnsley and my mother-in-law in Doncaster some 15minutes away. I remember Tony Moore as chief mate on the "Cerinthus" always in a fog, which was not surprising as the cargo managed to leak from tank to tank, all cargo handling operation were full of unwanted surprises. I had some of my happiest days with Houlders and best ships but the Cerinthus was not one of them, the company spirit went when there was influx of Furness people in 1971. A couple of years after this I got my master's and the first call to congratulate me was from Batch, I joked that he must be looking for bodies which he ademantly denied and told me I was better off where I was. His attitude was something I will always miss.
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  #69  
Old 30th December 2008, 14:41
ALAN TYLER ALAN TYLER is offline  
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Dear Jon! Oh what have you done, to talk so unkindly of the beloved (by many) Cerinthus. I sailed in her in 71/72 and did a dry/dock at Brighams and it was a happy ship then, and slightly chatty! Captain Charlesworth was a gent and John Mc Gregor ch/stwd, for me happy memories.
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  #70  
Old 30th December 2008, 15:39
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I think it was in the late sixties and I was a school boy in Northumberland when Bill Robson called in at our house to see my dad before going on to Bingham & Cowans. He asked if I wanted to go with him to see a real SHIP & of course I said yes.

My first impression of the Cerinthus was whoa!. I had never seen anything so big and glorious in my life and I believe that day changed my life. Being with the super' certainly opened numerous doors that day and I thought I was king of the yard until I sat in the duty mess and listened to stories from the engineers about this and that and their numerous runs ashore.

The hard work they talked about only seemed to be a small part of the job and the runs ashore made up for that. I could only hear Monte this and Monte that and in my young mind I had visions of sailing at sea for a few days and then arriving in Monte Carlo for a few weeks of fun. Years later I found they had been talking about Montevideo and because of the poor condition of the ship it took weeks to get there and then only a few days to discharge before more weeks at sea.

I was shown around the ship and then at lunch spent with all of the officers the engineers suggested to the deck lads that I spend time with them in the tanks to see how the workers "chucked the rivets". I was about 14 years old and eager to learn so agreed to clamber down and sit next to the worker. I have never heard anything as loud in my life as these "deaf" geordies replaced the rivets.

That still did not put me off and I signed up, I had actually hoped to go to the Cerinthus for my first trip but was sent to the Cumbria which was just over a year old and my best buddy from GCNS, Mike Fraser, went to the Cerinthus. I then joined the Brandon Priory and realised my career should be spent well away from old steam ships.

I have photographs of most of the ships I sailed on proudly displayed in my office and of course I have one of the Cerinthus that started it all and I can only say I have nothing but fond memories of her but then again does a day spent on board in dry dock count??.
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  #71  
Old 30th December 2008, 19:19
malachy malachy is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALAN TYLER View Post
Dear Jon! Oh what have you done, to talk so unkindly of the beloved (by many) Cerinthus. I sailed in her in 71/72 and did a dry/dock at Brighams and it was a happy ship then, and slightly chatty! Captain Charlesworth was a gent and John Mc Gregor ch/stwd, for me happy memories.
Alan,
what was the name of the pub just outside of the gates of Brighams.?, we used to go up there at lunch time(all the engineers were on day work) and have a couple of Double Maxims,so it must have been a Vaux's pub.would be unheard of now H & S and all that.
vinny
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  #72  
Old 31st December 2008, 04:10
Jon Vincent Jon Vincent is offline  
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Alan. I served on the Brandon and Bidford Priory's, Stolt Stuart and the lowly "Avagadro" all were better ships than the "Cerinthus". When I tell any of my seafaring friends I served in Houlders they all say " did'nt they have an awful ship called the "Cer-----". So you could say she famous for all the wrong reasons.
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  #73  
Old 31st December 2008, 08:53
non descript non descript is offline
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Avogadro was such a special ship she would not mind being classed as ‘lowly’, such style, such character and of course she was a Pressure Ship….. so she ranks as a Princess amongst the Paupers. I digress, it just goes to show (as they say in those French Controlled Pacific Islands) that one man’s Fish is another man’s Poisson.
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  #74  
Old 31st December 2008, 21:27
malachy malachy is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Vincent View Post
Alan. I served on the Brandon and Bidford Priory's, Stolt Stuart and the lowly "Avagadro" all were better ships than the "Cerinthus". When I tell any of my seafaring friends I served in Houlders they all say " did'nt they have an awful ship called the "Cer-----". So you could say she famous for all the wrong reasons.
Jon,
In '71-'72 did a total of 14 months on the Worlds Favourite Tanker and would have gone back for another 14 months if i'd been given the chance.
I know it was a hard worker and quite unpredictable(putting it mildly!!), but the camaraderie and teamwork made up for everything else that was negative.
OH HAPPY DAYS!!!!

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU AND YOUR FAMILY AND ALL AT SN
VINNY
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  #75  
Old 1st January 2009, 04:19
Jon Vincent Jon Vincent is offline  
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Tonga. Agree one hundred percent, "Avogadro" was very special, had a great time on her and that was really hard work. Happy New Year to all.
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