Royston Grange = 1959 - 1972 - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
15:28

Welcome
Welcome!Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. And what's more, it's completely FREE.

Click here to go to the forums home page and find out more.
Click here to join.
Log in
User Name Password

Royston Grange = 1959 - 1972

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #26  
Old 2nd August 2006, 15:35
NINJA NINJA is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 667
Cavendish

Hello Durango,

You were dead right in your last posting when you remarked about that way of life at sea has disappeared for good. We were lucky to experience it together with the camaraderie of our shipmates, nowadays you leave port and nominate the tide you are docking on 3,00 miles away, a computer unloads you in the minimum possible time. No chance of a week on the coast or decent runs ashore, just automated robots.

At least we have good memories. Wish I had a digital camera in those days, what shots I could have taken, not in Shanghai though in the 60's, all cameras were locked up in the bond. There was virtually no electric lighting and look at the place now, I still have my little red book on the "thoughts of chairman Mao"

Regards

Ninja.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 3rd August 2006, 21:15
DURANGO DURANGO is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1957 - 1969
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 848
Quote:
Originally Posted by NINJA
Hello Durango,

You were dead right in your last posting when you remarked about that way of life at sea has disappeared for good. We were lucky to experience it together with the camaraderie of our shipmates, nowadays you leave port and nominate the tide you are docking on 3,00 miles away, a computer unloads you in the minimum possible time. No chance of a week on the coast or decent runs ashore, just automated robots.

At least we have good memories. Wish I had a digital camera in those days, what shots I could have taken, not in Shanghai though in the 60's, all cameras were locked up in the bond. There was virtually no electric lighting and look at the place now, I still have my little red book on the "thoughts of chairman Mao"

Regards

Ninja.
As you say Nija wonderful days and to have had a digital camera then what a prize but we will have to make do with the pictures in our minds but for all that more than a camera i wish that i had taken a note book and pen and written down all the important things that happened to me i still have to this day nigh on 45 years on my train tickets and visa on rice paper to enable me to travel through China once i had left the hospital , i,m still having trouble working this thing i swore i would never get one then i found out about the merchant navy sites say no more be lucky mates at least we were there .
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 5th December 2006, 08:57
non descript non descript is offline
user
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
My location
Posts: 48
Crew List

The crew list on that fateful voyage.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Royston Grange Crew List.jpg (59.1 KB, 257 views)
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 5th December 2006, 10:10
Hugh Ferguson's Avatar
Hugh Ferguson Hugh Ferguson is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
My location
Posts: 5,535
Quote:
Originally Posted by NINJA View Post
Hello Durango,

You were dead right in your last posting when you remarked about that way of life at sea has disappeared for good. We were lucky to experience it together with the camaraderie of our shipmates, nowadays you leave port and nominate the tide you are docking on 3,00 miles away, a computer unloads you in the minimum possible time. No chance of a week on the coast or decent runs ashore, just automated robots.

At least we have good memories. Wish I had a digital camera in those days, what shots I could have taken, not in Shanghai though in the 60's, all cameras were locked up in the bond. There was virtually no electric lighting and look at the place now, I still have my little red book on the "thoughts of chairman Mao"

Regards

Ninja.
What on earth were Houlder Bros. doing in Shanghai!?!? Hugh Ferguson
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 5th December 2006, 13:07
leo hannan
member
 
Posts: n/a
Crew List

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonga View Post
The crew list on that fateful voyage.
Good Morning Tonga.
I don't know if you have it but there is a report on the "Royston Grange" tragedy in the Wikipedia online encyclopedia, it includes the Ranks as well as the names of Crew & Passengers.
Regards
Leo [URL="en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STV_Royston_Grange"]
I hope I've inserted the link correctly
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 6th December 2006, 07:08
ruud's Avatar
ruud ruud is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Hotels / Catering
Active: 1959 - 1993
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
My location
Posts: 5,898
Quote:
Originally Posted by leo hannan View Post
Good Morning Tonga.
I don't know if you have it but there is a report on the "Royston Grange" tragedy in the Wikipedia online encyclopedia, it includes the Ranks as well as the names of Crew & Passengers.
Regards
Leo [url="en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STV_Royston_Grange"]
I hope I've inserted the link correctly
Ahoy Leo,

Here the link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royston_Grange
__________________
All the best
ruud
Changer de cuisine donne de l'appétit!
My piccies also @:
http://www.vesseltracker.com/en/Phot...06a43771da649b
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 6th December 2006, 13:23
leo hannan
member
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruud View Post
Good Morning Ruud
Many thanks for that, I will get it right one day.
Regards
Leo
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 6th December 2006, 13:32
ruud's Avatar
ruud ruud is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Hotels / Catering
Active: 1959 - 1993
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
My location
Posts: 5,898
Quote:
Originally Posted by leo hannan View Post
Good Morning Ruud
Many thanks for that, I will get it right one day.
Regards
Leo
Ahoy Leo,
G'day to you as well, sure you will, have a nice day!

__________________
All the best
ruud
Changer de cuisine donne de l'appétit!
My piccies also @:
http://www.vesseltracker.com/en/Phot...06a43771da649b

Last edited by ruud; 6th December 2006 at 13:45..
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 7th December 2006, 09:04
captainchris's Avatar
captainchris captainchris is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 387
I was on Court Line's "Halcyon Days" when the "Royston Grange" incident occurred and we were chartered to YPF to take over the run of the "Tien Che", I think that was the name of the tanker involved. We ran from Bahia Blanca area to La Plata. One trip we had the same pilot as the tanker on that fateful night. He had just returned to work after surviving the collision and if I remember he did not look to good. When we approached the same stretch of river we too slipped over the bank and into the path of an outward bound vessel but managed to avoid another collision. The pilot was understandably shocked that this happened again and I believe that was his last trip due to his having a nervous breakdown. It still amazes me that after the previous collision that they allowed two vessels to approach at the same shoaling point, especially with us carrying around 20,000 tons of high sulphur crude!
Regards,
Chris
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 16th December 2006, 14:20
Les_Blues Les_Blues is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 14
Hi all. I joined the Hardwicke Grange just after the Royston disater. When we reached Uraguay the Royston was tied up in Montevideo. Some of us (not me) were allowed on board with the security people (investigations were still going on) . I got accounts of buckled steel doors in the engine room from an apparent explosion. The locals in Monte raised money to bury the victims and if I remember correctly they were buried collectively in a single grave because their identities were indeterminable.

A year or two later (on the Clarke Maxwell) docked in Barcelona and were surprised to see the Royston tied up there, presumably tugged across the Atlantic by the salvage people.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 16th December 2006, 15:05
Marcus Cardew's Avatar
Marcus Cardew Marcus Cardew is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1966 - 1984
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by runnymederob View Post
I would appreciate a crew list for the Royston Grange.I was on it for about a year in 1968/1969.best regards Robin Atkinson
Capt George Boothby's son was up for Mates with me in the Summer of '73, and I am sure he was called George as well....
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 16th December 2006, 15:39
leo hannan
member
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by Les_Blues View Post
Hi all. I joined the Hardwicke Grange just after the Royston disater. When we reached Uraguay the Royston was tied up in Montevideo. Some of us (not me) were allowed on board with the security people (investigations were still going on) . I got accounts of buckled steel doors in the engine room from an apparent explosion. The locals in Monte raised money to bury the victims and if I remember correctly they were buried collectively in a single grave because their identities were indeterminable.

A year or two later (on the Clarke Maxwell) docked in Barcelona and were surprised to see the Royston tied up there, presumably tugged across the Atlantic by the salvage people.
Hi Les.
John Houlder chartered a plane for the family and relatives to fly down to Montevideo and attend the service for the deceased. A very moving time I'm told. You are quite correct in saying that the Royston was towed to Spain and scrapped. There was a rumour that someone had offered to purchase her to be refurbished but John Houlder refused for obvious reasons. Like I say a rumour but who knows.
Regards
Leo
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 16th December 2006, 19:07
non descript non descript is offline
user
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
My location
Posts: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Les_Blues View Post
Hi all. I joined the Hardwicke Grange just after the Royston disater. When we reached Uraguay the Royston was tied up in Montevideo. Some of us (not me) were allowed on board with the security people (investigations were still going on) . I got accounts of buckled steel doors in the engine room from an apparent explosion. The locals in Monte raised money to bury the victims and if I remember correctly they were buried collectively in a single grave because their identities were indeterminable.

A year or two later (on the Clarke Maxwell) docked in Barcelona and were surprised to see the Royston tied up there, presumably tugged across the Atlantic by the salvage people.
Les,
Whilst I am sure the locals in Montevideo wished to make every effort to support the grieving families, and no one would deny their private generosity and support, John Houlder made every effort and more to ensure that deceased were given every respect and wanted for nothing in terms of a proper and fitting tribute; indeed as Leo has said, he moved with great speed to charter a plane for the family and relatives to fly without delay, south to Montevideo; and every aspect of the funeral and service was provided for by him.

Such was the scale of the catastrophe that very sadly the earthly remains were able to be buried in just six urns in two communal graves in the British Cemetery at Montevideo on 20th May 1972.

Regards
Mark
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 16th December 2006, 21:31
Les_Blues Les_Blues is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 14
Sounds familiar Tonga, perhaps the locals in Monte raised money for a commemorative gesture, I think there was a plaque or the likes. I recall that many of the crew on the Hardwicke knew people who perished on the Royston.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 16th December 2006, 21:50
duquesa's Avatar
duquesa duquesa is online now  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1953 - 2014
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
My location
Posts: 1,259
Royston Grange

That was indeed very true. Many of the "meat boat" people, across all departments, were well acquainted. The memorial service held at Tower Hill was one of the most moving experiences I've had. The church was filled with Houlder's seafarers and ex. seafarers. The reading of the roll call was something I shall never forget.
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 29th December 2006, 20:52
Brent Pyburn Brent Pyburn is offline  
Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1966 - 1980
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
My location
Posts: 42
The Royston Grange brings back some very sad memories for me. I was at King Edward VII college in 1968 doing MAR and my closest pal was Stewart Third. We were inseparable during our time at the college and got into all sorts of mischief. Stuart had a girlfriend called Bev at Rachel McMillans Teacher Training College in Catford and she had a friend Gill, who came down to London from Stoke for the weekend. To cut a long story short I eventually married that friend and Stuart was due to marry Bev. Unfortunately Stewart was third mate on the Royston Grange and was killed in the incident. I am still married to the same girl after 36 years andwe are still in touch with Bev who never got married
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 29th December 2006, 21:20
non descript non descript is offline
user
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
My location
Posts: 48
Stewart Third

Brent,

I am sorry to hear the sad story; it was a very tough one for many people. I am pleased to see that some good came from your meeting Stewart Third, and my congratulations to you and Gill on 36 years of marriage.

Kind regards
Mark
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 30th December 2006, 17:50
Brent Pyburn Brent Pyburn is offline  
Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1966 - 1980
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
My location
Posts: 42
Happier Memories

Many thanks for your thoughts Tonga and of course you're right a lot of good came out of my short friendship with Stewart.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 2nd January 2007, 03:08
Jon Vincent Jon Vincent is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 371
Royston Grange

It was interesting to read all the correspondence concerning the "Royston", these ships were crewed by a very close knit group of people, once in it was hard to leave, I will never forget the pride the whole crew had in the "Royston". I joined in Jan 1968 as 3rd Off when the vessel was laid up during the meat ban, on the Queen Elizabeth wharf in Falmouth Docks, for me it was a good appointment as I lived locally. The Hardwicke was moored outside us and the "Duquesa" the other side of the jetty. We were the live vessel looking after the other two Ships, the "Hardwicke" left first under the command of Capt T A G Head the senior master at the time in late Feb 1968, The "Duquesa" left next under the command of Capt George Boothby, she had a lot of problems being activated and I got to know Capt "George" well, as I ran errands as the local boy for him. The "Royston Grange" left last on 4th March 1968 for the River plate light ship. Of the deck staff through the lay-up I was the only one that sailed but I kept in touch with Tristan Tate the Ch/Off for years. Our sailing master was Capt Don Murray another Cornishman. The lay-up was very beneficial to me, as by the time the ships sailed I knew every square inch of them and three days before we sailed I met my wife who worked as a Nanny in the Falmouth Hotel. In June 68 I got engaged and was close to my 1st Mates, pay on the meat boats was the lowest in the company, I approached Capt D Parkin (head of personnel) and asked for promotion the 2nd Off, He offered me the 2nd off job on the new bulk carrier "Clydesdale", it took until the end of Oct 68 to leave the "Royston" needless to say the period in between I was subject endless ribbing from the other officers and pressure from Capt Murray who thought I was committing suicide. I kept in touch with my friends up until their deaths on the "Royston". I left the "Cerinthus" 8th April 72, after a few days a home I had a cal from Capt Dennis asking me if I would Join the "Royston" I was told that it would be as 1st off and my wife would be expected to go as well, my friend Colin Craddock was Ch Off along with his wife Jan on their honeymoon and that as a special concession his younger brother James would sail as cadet on the trip, Houlders never let that happen normally, I declined the offer much to my wife's dismay as our first house was due to be finished in the next couple of weeks, I saw the disaster on the news and got a telephone call within minutes, I sat in silence for a couple of days, Capt Dennis sent me the "Service if Commemoration" with a the names, I could not go to the actual service as I did not know how I would face the families of my friends. The final voyage of the "Royston" was supposed to be a happy event for all concerned it ended in one the saddest tragedies in MN history, The beautiful ship marked my life for ever, I met my wife and enjoyed the friendship of some the finest people ever to go to sea.

Last edited by non descript; 2nd January 2007 at 09:44.. Reason: added an "e" to Hardwicke
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 2nd January 2007, 09:43
non descript non descript is offline
user
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
My location
Posts: 48
Catp Jon V. Vincent,

Thank you for your well written and moving memories. Yes, those were very much the times when the crews remained together as a tight family ship by ship and anyone seeking to leave the family was regarded as "most strange". Certainly a time for very mixed emotions to find the ship you could have been on. was involved in such a tragedy.

It is a curious semi coincidence that you left the “security” of the Royston Grange to join a Hadley Boat; I left the happy security of Hadley's Cumbria in 1972 and declined Captain Parkin’s suggestion to join the Royston Grange in April of that year, joining the Cavendish instead, as I wanted to gain experience in Gas Tankers. - If I have the right man, Tristan Tate was from the Shetlands? A very decent man indeed and I sailed with him on the Cumbria. I have taken the liberty of adding an “e” to Hardwicke.

Regards
Mark

Last edited by non descript; 29th December 2008 at 09:08.. Reason: colours change
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 3rd January 2007, 04:14
Jon Vincent Jon Vincent is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 371
Royston Grange

Hi Mark. I don't mind having my spelling corrected, I always prided myself as seaman first and foremost. Tristan Taite (my wife corrected that one) was from the Shetland Islands, but stayed with his sister, who had a boarding house at St Ives. I served as a cadet in Prince Line, where everyone envied Houlders, I joined after my 2nd mates ticket, the difference was night and day, the loyalty to the company and ones ship was incredible, I credit John Houdler and Capt Parkin and his assistant Mr Bachelor. It was an very family orientated company. the senior meat boat Captain and Chiefs chose their own staff and took it very personally when they left, Capt Don Murray gave me the Houlders jack staff flag when I left, telling me that I would be back, I still have the flag, A lot of that company spirit died when Houlders absorbed a lot of the Furness people when their fleet contracted around 1973/4. A real irony to all this is that I am now a Mooring Master engaged in offshore lightering operation in the gulf of Mexico, I now rely on the very very thing that cause that awful collision, inter-ship suction, to put two large tankers together. Regards Jon
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 3rd January 2007, 11:47
marinero's Avatar
marinero marinero is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 802
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catp Jon V. Vincent View Post
Hi Mark. I don't mind having my spelling corrected, I always prided myself as seaman first and foremost. Tristan Taite (my wife corrected that one) was from the Shetland Islands, but stayed with his sister, who had a boarding house at St Ives. I served as a cadet in Prince Line, where everyone envied Houlders, I joined after my 2nd mates ticket, the difference was night and day, the loyalty to the company and ones ship was incredible, I credit John Houdler and Capt Parkin and his assistant Mr Bachelor. It was an very family orientated company. the senior meat boat Captain and Chiefs chose their own staff and took it very personally when they left, Capt Don Murray gave me the Houlders jack staff flag when I left, telling me that I would be back, I still have the flag, A lot of that company spirit died when Houlders absorbed a lot of the Furness people when their fleet contracted around 1973/4. A real irony to all this is that I am now a Mooring Master engaged in offshore lightering operation in the gulf of Mexico, I now rely on the very very thing that cause that awful collision, inter-ship suction, to put two large tankers together. Regards Jon
Hi Jon.
You are definitely right about the loyalty towards Houlders' from their Crews. Sadly Capt. Parkin passed away some years ago. I don't know where Ken Batchelor is now. When he left Houlders he took up a position at Buckingham Palace as some sort of Usher( I think) Maybe Mark(Tonga) would have more info on this. The last I heard of John Houlder was that he was still the manager of Elstree Airport and still piloting his own plane. Another guy in Personnel was Mike Louis who dealt with the Ratings, he was Houlders thro & thro. I consider myself lucky in having become involved within the Houlder Family of employees.
Regards
Leo
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 3rd January 2007, 18:56
non descript non descript is offline
user
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
My location
Posts: 48
Jon and Leo,

Yes I concur very much with your sentiments – for whatever reason Houlders was indeed like a happy family and there was immense loyalty and support for us all. Sadly the comment about the company spirit evaporating with the arrival of FW does have an element of truth (this is not meant to offend those people from FW, it was just a fact of life and a reflected a different culture), although curiously when, later on, the entire lot was taken over by the Tung family, this feeling of once again working with a family concern returned. There were always people who failed to grasp what was really going on who railed against the Chinese, but if the truth were known, they were as loyal and devoted as the original owning family – just different; which not that surprising given the huge difference between Anglo-Saxon and Chinese culture.

Without a doubt, I do believe the leadership of this family spirit came from John Houlder and led to him picking some special people to head up various departments. It would be wrong to concentrate on just a few names, but having seen their names already mentioned above, I certainly recognize the value that Dennis Parkin and Ron Batchelor added – without them I would have certainly have had a very different life. - I’m sorry to say that I am unaware of the whereabouts of “Batch”, but I will have a search. I still remember his almost childlike delight when, having run an advertisement in the national press for sea staff, using a photograph of an unknown (to him) fresh faced apprentice, with the caption “Meet John, he has traveled the world…..come and join him at Houlders” – he was amazed when “John” walked into the office one day and they could put a name to the face. It is a matter of debate whether the image of this young lad’s “charm and innocence” as he was seen taking a sight, scrubbing the deck and looking at the radar, actually resulted in anyone joining the company…..
Regards
Mark

Last edited by non descript; 3rd January 2007 at 20:46..
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 3rd January 2007, 19:59
NINJA NINJA is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 667
Batch

Hello Tonga,

I believe I might be able to shed some light on "Batch', I will follow it up with an ex-Houlders man and I believe there is a royal connection.

Regards

Tom.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 3rd January 2007, 20:35
marinero's Avatar
marinero marinero is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 802
Hello all.
I mistakenly give "Batch" the name of Ken when in fact it was Ron. I do apologise for any confusion. One for you Tonga, I have in my posession a book by an Edward E. Stevens called Shipping Practices published 1946(5th Edition) in it are various examples of Charter Parties,Bill of Sale,Bills of Lading(Coastal&Liner)Plus A River plate outward Form from Houlder Line Do you know if this guy worked for Houlder in those days of yore. These are original forms as far as I can tell.
Reagrds
Leo
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SD 14 - Liberty Ship Replacement Pusser509 Ship Research 91 6th October 2017 16:02
Royston Grange Claire1 Say Hello 14 21st January 2013 20:21
Rounton Grange = 1913 - 1934 non descript Houlder Brothers 0 2nd February 2009 10:14
World Cruises Paul UK News and Views from the Shipping World 2 10th March 2007 10:46



Support SN


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.