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Longest voyage?

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  #26  
Old 8th July 2018, 15:23
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Changing articles, and I guess the routine was to sign on before signing off. Only once went into the Shipping Office to sign on articles and then went to the ship. Risky business!


Long spent at sea... probably by the submariners!
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  #27  
Old 8th July 2018, 20:32
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I was thinking the other day about modern submariners. Off they go and then spend most of the trip under the water with nary a sight of sunshine or stars.

Being underwater is a situation studiously avoided by Merchant Seafarers.
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  #28  
Old 8th July 2018, 22:26
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This might help with this one.



Charles Green, Retired USN Submarine Service
Answered Dec 20, 2015

Define lived.

I spent as long as 8 months on one deployment.

Continuasly submerged? Max I ever heard of was around 165 days without resuplly.
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  #29  
Old 9th July 2018, 00:14
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Long voyage, long story, long ago,

In the early 1960's I worked with an elderly ex mariner Jack Lord who was our drawing office records Clark but a NZ born man who had a long experience as a seaman on sailing vessels .
His last days at sea were spent on the square rigger Pamir and on
Huia, a top sail schooner owned by Nobel and used to ship munitions and explosives between Australia and Auckland .
When these ships went out of service he did a brief time on steam and motor ships before deciding that it was not to his liking and he retired ashore.
He was a pleasant , quiet natured person with a wealth of knowledge about almost everything , what I would call a real gem.
One of his authentic stories was of a sailing ship voyage from Europe to NZ when the ship became becalmed for a long period , so long that the crew were on starvation rations and the wooden hulled ship was stricken with un-wetted hull planking opening up to jeopardise the ship when fair winds did arrive.
Crew were constantly bucketing sea water over the decks and hull planks to minimise the dangers.
The ship eventually arrived in Auckland and Jack supported his story with a press cutting from the Auckland paper showing the skinny crew members including a slim young Jack Lord.
He was about 70, me about 26 , at the time of the story telling and the full facts escape me but I am sure there was a claim made to be the longest sea voyage on record .
Jack had two sons , one was a advanced mathematician at a US University and the other had been the deputy head master of Kaipara College near Auckland but my attempts to locate the latter to possible refresh the details drew a blank .
I can vouch for it being a true story but I am otherwise short of information as to the ship's name , the year of the voyage , the 1910's, 1920's or the 1930's ,or anything else.
Maybe some else has heard it?

Bob
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  #30  
Old 9th July 2018, 00:41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobClay View Post
I was thinking the other day about modern submariners. Off they go and then spend most of the trip under the water with nary a sight of sunshine or stars.

Being underwater is a situation studiously avoided by Merchant Seafarers.
Ah but they did, Bob.

The late Prof/Dr./Capt. Berry told me of taking sights through the periscope.

(Are your lot going to come and shoot me now?)
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  #31  
Old 9th July 2018, 01:31
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Longest tow.

5,000 ton Jubilee Floating Dock towed by two Dutch Smit & Co tugs 1932, Tyne to Wellington, 13,627 miles. 166 days!
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  #32  
Old 9th July 2018, 09:34
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Originally Posted by Varley View Post
Ah but they did, Bob.

The late Prof/Dr./Capt. Berry told me of taking sights through the periscope.

(Are your lot going to come and shoot me now?)
I remember when I was a kid I bought a tank periscope From the Army and Navy stores. In those days they were proper Army and Navy stores where you could buy all sorts of useful things like carrying pouches for Bren Gun magazines and such.

The periscope only gave you about a foot of extra height, but that was useful for looking over hedges and fences and the like. Couldn't do that these days or you'd be doing a long trip in Wormwood Scrubs.
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  #33  
Old 9th July 2018, 12:32
lakercapt lakercapt is offline  
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[QUOTE=seaman38;2914329]Perhaps some one could rename this thread 'longest sea passage' as yonks ago in my days 'longest voyage' meant time you were away from home. My longest voyage was 22 months on a green hulled ship with a red and white flag on a green funnel, guess who! fortunately it was a very happy ship with a good skipper who cared about his crew.


At a guess I would say this was one of "Ropners" ships as I did my first trip and it was 2 years 1 month and 26 days.
From Port pirie to Avonmouth was 74 days but we stopped for bunkers at Durban and Las Palmas (coal)
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  #34  
Old 9th July 2018, 20:55
seaman38 seaman38 is offline  
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[QUOTE=lakercapt;2914927
At a guess I would say this was one of "Ropners" ships as I did my first trip and it was 2 years 1 month and 26 days.
From Port pirie to Avonmouth was 74 days but we stopped for bunkers at Durban and Las Palmas (coal)[/QUOTE]

Correct Cap'n, we sailed from Dieppe for a 3 month trip, should have known better when we turned left for Suez rather than right for New York! Also the previous 6 week trip of seven months may have been a clue!, but lulled into a false sense of security because we actually had done 4 x 6 week trips!.

Luckily it was a happy ship and a Capt' with foresight, whilst bunkering Suez he ordered many sheets of fancy hardboard, marine ply and mouldings and Chippy and self (3/m) constructed a bar and cupboards in the Officers Lounge and then Chippy and Bosun constructed one in crews mess. Our Bar was called! wait for it! really original!..... 'The Seaview Bar'..... We had beer mats, serviettes and flags printed in Hong Kong. It all worked very well, no drinking in the cabins and an 'Honesty Bar Book' Only drinking in the cabin was end of 2000-2400 and 0000-0400 coming off watch when you had a drink with your counterpart from the E/R, collected by the bridgewallah and usually consumed in 3/m or 2/m cabin as no boiler suits allowed in Lounge be they E/R or Deck.

Most of the time was spent traversing the seas from Oz to China, China to Canada then China, with a trip to Indonesia now and again and drydocking in Japan. Madam Butterfly had nothing on my Japanese love life! Very little shore time in Oz or Canada, plenty of time in China but not allowed to go ashore and nothing to go for anyway in the 50's...………….

Met my future wife two days before we sailed on that trip, but didn't know she would be, so a happy and lucky ship in more days than one
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  #35  
Old 9th July 2018, 21:33
davemoore davemoore is offline
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Longest voyage

Chatty chapmans Lynton,Rio Grande De Sol to Japan 61days ended on lime juice the water looked like Newcastle Brown but bloody hell didn't taste like it but ad a great time in Japan plenty of money in the ship,We were millionaires as at that they were over 1000s Yen to the pound .
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  #36  
Old 9th July 2018, 21:52
davemoore davemoore is offline
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Longest voyages

Forgot to mention the voyage was over 12,000 miles at 7knotts
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  #37  
Old 10th July 2018, 03:53
frankshipsea frankshipsea is offline  
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from yokahama to philidelphia on m/s bellami with a load of steel broken down half way across the pacific for one week in a big swell.
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  #38  
Old 13th July 2018, 01:42
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In 1972 I was a trainee broker in London. I was in the office the day of the fixture of the Glenpark because (I think) she came straight from the builder's (Upper Clyde) yard. From memory the freight rate was Pds3.50 per ton so it was no "walk in the park" for the Owners. Remember though bunkers were only around US$14.00 per ton. At about the same time I fixed a 42,000 tonner for 30000/10 bulk wheat Sydney to Beirut at Pds3.00 per ton and she ballasted to Sydney from Hamburg via the Cape. Mind you Beirut was a good discharge installation with 6,000mt daily discharge rate.
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  #39  
Old 13th July 2018, 12:02
rodhaigh rodhaigh is offline  
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RE Longest voyage
My first trip to sea was in the 'British Caution' at the time of the so called Suez Crisis'.
Outward from the UK (Tyneside) we called in at Tenerife for bunkers, Then Capetown for engine repairs, on to Abadan where we loaded bunker oil, back around the Cape to Luanda, Lobito, Ango Ango and Lagos, Back around the Cape stopping at Durban for repairs and on to Abadan, once again to load bunker oil this time for Swansea again around the Cape.
This leg of my first trip was non-stop, except for an offshore wait at Dakar for a rendezvous with a water barge and on arrival in Swansea we had been at sea for 64 days.
Total time UK-UK was a fraction over 6months to lift 25,000 tons of cargo
I related this tale many years later to a cadet who was moaning that his time at sea was interfering with his social life, only to be shot down with "ah yes Mr Haigh, but ships have engines nowadays!
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  #40  
Old 13th July 2018, 22:37
caleuche caleuche is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Mac View Post
46 days Durban to San Antonio Chile, Lutetian.
Ray, ¿¿can you give me date of arrival of the LUTETIAN in San Antonio?? She was owned by Oregon Steamship Co., London, and I was Oregon's
General Agent here in Chile in the 70s.
Best regrads,
Caleuche
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  #41  
Old 14th July 2018, 02:39
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Hi Bob.
My brother did 128 days from Port Victoria to Falmouth on the Pamir, now that was a good long trip.
tugger
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  #42  
Old 14th July 2018, 07:13
seaman38 seaman38 is offline  
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Hi Bob.
My brother did 128 days from Port Victoria to Falmouth on the Pamir, now that was a good long trip.
tugger
Sorry, no disrespect, but thought we were talking about our own personal experiences twixt ports, not relatives or historical, otherwise may as well quote Columbus or Vasco de Gama.

'Pamir' a sad end to a fine vessel and so many young lives lost, I was on one of the vessels that went to her aid, but alas to no avail. We were getting torn to pieces ourselves but I don't think anyone on board our vessel thought of their own situation, if I remember rightly it was 1957
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  #43  
Old 14th July 2018, 09:27
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Originally Posted by IAN M View Post
Members are confusing voyages with passages. A voyage is the time spent on Articles. A passage is the time spent between ports.
Really. who knew?
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  #44  
Old 14th July 2018, 10:17
garry Norton garry Norton is offline  
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I remember doing Vancouver to Auckland on the Waihemo as a cadet doing about 9 knots I think it took over 30 days, may be those more intelligent than me may be able to correct me
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  #45  
Old 14th July 2018, 11:01
Johnny Walker Johnny Walker is offline  
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The longest sea passage I ever did was on the Sharpness (Jebsen's) From Constanza to Shanghai via the cape as the Suez canal was closed in about 75. That took about 42 days including a few days at anchor waiting to go into the port. Prior to this we had been in Oran (Algeria) and Lobito and Luanda (Angola) So no one on board had a decent run ashore for a few months. The port after Shanghai was Yokohama which was well worth waiting for.
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  #46  
Old 14th July 2018, 11:45
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Originally Posted by garry Norton View Post
I remember doing Vancouver to Auckland on the Waihemo as a cadet doing about 9 knots I think it took over 30 days, may be those more intelligent than me may be able to correct me

A short voyage.... even at 9 knots. ;-)

Vancouver to Auckland 6197 naut miles @ 9 knots, 28d 17h.

You probably had it as 30 days because it crossed the date line and also time change so if you allow the time zones it comes to exactly THIRTY DAYS!!!!


One www to get distances etc... try out sea-distances.org Quite handy. Sadly my 40 year old Tamaya NC 77 has done it's last calculation!

Stephen
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  #47  
Old 14th July 2018, 11:53
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This fellow is a first class... IDIOT! 1067 days at sea.



Critics of Reid Stowe actually believe that the record for the longest voyage was held, not by Sanders, but by Fridtjof Nansen whose voyage to the North Pole in 1893 saw him spend around 1067 days at sea.Apr 21, 2015




Top 5 longest ship Voyages. | Thortech



https://www.thortechnology.co.uk/unc...-ship-voyages/
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  #48  
Old 18th July 2018, 20:50
John Gowers John Gowers is offline
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Smile Around the World with the Nordic Texas

Longest Voyage I can remember was Rotterdam to Nagoya, Japan, through Suez, on the Nordic Texas in ballast, Japan to Savannah with sulphur and then Port Sulphur to Rotterdam with yet more sulphur. We did one more trip to Port Sulphur and then I paid off in Rotterdam.

Around the World in more than 80 days sorry can't remember how long it took from Rotterdam to Japan but I remember it seemed to take for ever.

One thing was you could always tell guys who had done a few trips on a sulphur boats as the gold braid turned brown.
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  #49  
Old 19th July 2018, 00:28
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On Stonehaven it turned black!
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  #50  
Old 19th July 2018, 01:02
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On Stonehaven it turned black!


Should have kept her original name.... HOPEPARK!


All I remember was that it was a ship to be avoided... along with MUIRFIELD and a couple others.
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