The Surgeon's Log. - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
05:53

Welcome
Welcome!Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. And what's more, it's completely FREE.

Click here to go to the forums home page and find out more.
Click here to join.
Log in
User Name Password

The Surgeon's Log.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #26  
Old 12th July 2009, 13:17
Hugh Ferguson's Avatar
Hugh Ferguson Hugh Ferguson is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
My location
Posts: 5,535
Sad to say, that not so long after the photograph (see post 1) of myself and Bill Holman was taken he died, on Jan.14th 2006 aged 92, and that was the end of my association with any living person associated with the book, The Surgeon's Log.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 12th July 2009, 14:31
johnb42 johnb42 is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 577
Hugh,
The photograph taken in Japan in 1907 - great picture, thanks for posting.
John
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 10th June 2010, 05:55
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 18,354
Hamish/Hugh & Sister Eleff, after an unavoidable delay, the book is now winging it's way to Bob W. in Port Melbourne.

An interesting read, highlighting how some things have changed and some have stayed the same in a hundred years of seafaring, all the more interesting for the background supplied by Hugh - arigato Ferguson San.

John T.

PS Thanks to Hamish for sending the book on too.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 11th June 2010, 12:50
bobw bobw is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1965 - 1972
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
My location
Posts: 408
Looking forward to a good read. Thanks john.
__________________
Bob
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 11th June 2010, 21:36
Hugh Ferguson's Avatar
Hugh Ferguson Hugh Ferguson is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
My location
Posts: 5,535
Quote:
Originally Posted by trotterdotpom View Post
Hamish/Hugh & Sister Eleff, after an unavoidable delay, the book is now winging it's way to Bob W. in Port Melbourne.

An interesting read, highlighting how some things have changed and some have stayed the same in a hundred years of seafaring, all the more interesting for the background supplied by Hugh - arigato Ferguson San.

John T.

PS Thanks to Hamish for sending the book on too.
How strange that on the same day, Thursday 10th June, that this thread was resurrected, I should receive an E.mail from the son of Dr Marshall Walker (it was his father's letter in Sea Breezes, Oct. 1995, that set me off into the research). He is coming to Cornwall and wants to visit.

I'm sure Bob will enjoy the book. The author had NINE rejections of his manuscript. On the ninth rejection he recounts how, standing in front of his consulting room fire he was all set to consign it to the flames, but on looking out the window he noticed a sign painted on a window on the opposite side of the street which stated, Chapman & Hall (Dicken's publisher).
They accepted and the result, 32 editions!! The last one was dedicated to his daughter; the same Mrs Jill Martin who visited me here in Cornwall bringing with her, her father's original log, written up daily, in doctor's hand-writing, aboard the Polyphemus, from January to June 1907.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 12th June 2010, 11:32
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 18,354
Lots of coincidences, Hugh - thanks again.

John T.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 26th June 2010, 12:52
bobw bobw is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1965 - 1972
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
My location
Posts: 408
I have finished reading "The Surgeon's Log" and shall forward it to the first person who PM's me with their name and address.
A great read.
__________________
Bob
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 29th June 2010, 12:06
bobw bobw is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1965 - 1972
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
My location
Posts: 408
The book is now on it's way to Lionel in Western Australia.
__________________
Bob
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 9th July 2010, 06:17
teb teb is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Radio Officer
Active: 1943 - 1952
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 538
The surgeons Log

I too have now finished reading "The Surgeon's Log" and will be happy to forward it to the first person who PM's me with their name & address .
It is a fascinating read and for me brought back forgotten memories of the voyage I completed on a Dutch Blue Funnel vessel some 60 odd years ago calling at all the ports in Java & Celebes mentioned in the book
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 9th July 2010, 13:31
The Dog The Dog is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 74
BF ships names in fiction

All Blue funnel men writing fiction (and there are quite a few ) name their ships after female characters in the trojan wars, ref Richard Woodman's Antogone whereas all the Holt ships were named after male charactors except Hecuba and Gorgan. Hecuba was Queen of Troy wife of King Priam, the Gorgans were three female baddies one of whom Medusa was killed by Perseus.
The ship Hecuba was not built for BF but was a WW1 German prize. Gorgan was a very desirable posting as she ran the Australia to Malaya service carrying Ozzie holidaymakers and sheep....... and we want no snide remarks on the connection.. Endo
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 10th July 2010, 05:13
teb teb is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Radio Officer
Active: 1943 - 1952
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 538
The Surgeon's Log

The book is now wending it's way to Malcolm in France - Teb
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 11th July 2010, 03:00
makko's Avatar
makko makko is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1979 - 1998
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
My location
Posts: 5,702
Quote:
Originally Posted by R651400 View Post
Thanks Lionel... When read it will be passed on in a similar manner. 73 Malcolm
Malcolm, would it be possible that the book wends its way to Mexico next?
Regards,
Dave R.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 11th July 2010, 05:34
surfaceblow surfaceblow is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Other Merchant Fleets
Department: Engineering
Active: 1972 - 2005
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
My location
Posts: 1,384
I was looking for a book to down load to my phone so I could read while waiting for the OWMBO is shopping or going to other appointments while I wait for her. I found The Surgeon's Log in Google Books. I still like paper than these little electronic devices but if I carry a book around with me I get the evil eyes.

http://books.google.com/books?id=Lzg...page&q&f=false
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 11th July 2010, 08:00
Reef Knot Reef Knot is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
My location
Posts: 1,298
What a nice read this thread has been! Ken.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 12th July 2010, 00:56
makko's Avatar
makko makko is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1979 - 1998
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
My location
Posts: 5,702
Quote:
Originally Posted by R651400 View Post
Hi Dave, Tony Allen just beat you to it but will make sure you're next after Tony. B-r
Malcolm
Many Thanks, Malcolm. I look forward to it.
Dave
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 12th July 2010, 03:10
KIWI's Avatar
KIWI KIWI is offline  
KIWI
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1949 - 1955
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
My location
Posts: 473
Would advise local members this book is held in the Wellington NZ main Public Library.Have just ordered it up. KIWI
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 12th July 2010, 06:46
kauvaka kauvaka is offline  
Senior Member
Active: 1959 - 1963
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 334
Kia ora Kiwi, will look for it when I'm next in Wellington in October. When there last month I pottered thro' shelves 387.2 - .5 and 910.45. You've probably covered these but there are some good NZ seafaring titles there at the Wellington Public Library, we are lucky.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 12th July 2010, 11:12
Pat Kennedy's Avatar
Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 13,873
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dog View Post
All Blue funnel men writing fiction (and there are quite a few ) name their ships after female characters in the trojan wars, ref Richard Woodman's Antogone whereas all the Holt ships were named after male charactors except Hecuba and Gorgan. Hecuba was Queen of Troy wife of King Priam, the Gorgans were three female baddies one of whom Medusa was killed by Perseus.
The ship Hecuba was not built for BF but was a WW1 German prize. Gorgan was a very desirable posting as she ran the Australia to Malaya service carrying Ozzie holidaymakers and sheep....... and we want no snide remarks on the connection.. Endo
There were also( according to Duncan Haws 'Blue Funnel Line') Atalanta, Hebe, Medusa, and Sarah Nicholson. All owned by Holts and all female, although I never clapped eyes on any one of them.
Regards,
Pat
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 18th August 2010, 11:42
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,406
The Surgeons Log
The book is now on its way to mexico to Makko Tony Allen
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 7th January 2012, 21:46
Sister Eleff's Avatar
Sister Eleff Sister Eleff is offline  
Nursie
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
My location
Posts: 5,819
I hope that everyone who has read this, much travelled, wee book has added their name and country in the fly page
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 8th January 2012, 01:59
The Dog The Dog is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 74
I found a first edition of this book in a job lot bought at an auction. I read it and as there was a hunt on for copies I lent it to one of the luminaries of the BFA. Needless to say I have not seen it since and would like it back.

I have one doubt about the good Doctors memory, early on he mentions seeing the sailors stowing the sails away. I believe Holts dispensed with sails in the late 19thC and landed the yards in Birkenhead where some still lay in 1950. They had been used to make derricks for the newer ships but that stopped with the introduction of much lighter steel derricks.

If this is so the Doctor is mistaken about the sails, he probably saw the sailors stowing away the hatch tents.

A right Nerdish comment but I can't help myself.


I have another wartime book about a run crew going to the US to bring a wooden minesweeper back to the UK (a Mickey Mouse). They travelled out as passengers in a Blue Funnel vessel "Priam" which the previous voyage had suffered sever damage in a hurricane when the deck cargo of tanks had broken adrift and charged around the fore deck. The hull had been holed and she took in so much water she only just made it to port. On arrival her forecastle and fore deck were under water as far as the saloon windows. I have never seen or heard of this incident, can anyone help.

Priam was renamed Glenorchy in 1948 and later Phemius.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 8th January 2012, 15:08
Hugh Ferguson's Avatar
Hugh Ferguson Hugh Ferguson is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
My location
Posts: 5,535
"sailors stowing away the hatch tents"

I don't think that there were "hatch tents" in those days: I can remember them as being a recent innovation. The sails referred to by the good doctor would not have been square sails but fore and aft sails which, in extreme circumstances, could be set on fore stays and back stays.
The Polyphemus in which the doctor sailed was 1906 built and, in 1907 when he made his voyage, a large proportion of the crew would have been in sail and therefore used to handling them. Yes, I'm sure sails would still have been in a steamship at the time of his voyage.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 29th January 2012, 22:19
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 6,758
Hi, Dog!, Hi, Hugh,

Memories Memories!

To take Priam first, I recall reading that she arrived at Liverpool down by the head with a draft of 42 feet. I believe (but might be wrong) that her Master was Captain Jimmy Nelson. Be that as it may, Jimmy Nelson lived in Osmaston Road in Prenton (a few hundred yards from our own home in Queens Drive). For reasons which I did not understand until much later in life, I was under standing orders as a child (born 1943) to be on my best behaviour whenever I was anywhere near Chez Nelson. I later learned that this was because Jimmy Nelson had given my Dad a good reference at some point; and NOTHING WHATSOEVER was to be done which might blot Dad's copybook. Dad later told me that he had piloted Jimmy Nelson into the Mersey at some point in the war (whether in Priam or not, I do not know) and had been obliged to anchor prior to docking. Nelson was then called ashore to an urgent conference. Before going ashore he said to Dad, "You seem to know what you are doing. Take good care of her" - and left Dad and the Mate to put the ship into Gladstone and her berth. Dad would have been aged 32 in 1942. The name Nelson was therefore sanctified in the Youde household.

As to the Surgeon's Log, Hugh, what an interesting yarn and sequence of events. I would very much like to read the book one day. (I wonder how it might compare with Richard Gordon?) Your own research and information re Bill Holman senior reminds us that, unfortunately, we all have feet of clay.
Please forgive me if I start a new Thread on influential books!
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 30th January 2012, 11:19
Hugh Ferguson's Avatar
Hugh Ferguson Hugh Ferguson is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
My location
Posts: 5,535
The ensueing fortunes of the 2nd mate, and the master of the Polyphemus, could not have been more different. The 2nd mate, Bill Holman, eventually became master of that same ship and, unfortunately, put her aground departing Hong Kong-that was the end of his Blue Funnel career (and the reason his son did not go to sea in that company).
The master of the Polyphemus, Frank Chrimes, subsequently commanded the new 1914 Ulysses (sistership of the Nestor), he retired c.1930.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 30th January 2012, 13:05
Hugh Ferguson's Avatar
Hugh Ferguson Hugh Ferguson is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
My location
Posts: 5,535
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh Ferguson View Post
To see the old plate photograph, taken by the author, of Ponta,https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...65/ppuser/8509, the sweetheart of 2nd mate Horner, walking down a street in Kobe in 1907, try this link.
I'm not surprised Mr Horner (Bill Holman) fell in love with her!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off




Support SN


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.