Best position for ship handling. - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
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Best position for ship handling.

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  #26  
Old 30th December 2019, 02:30
kewl dude's Avatar
kewl dude kewl dude is offline  
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re: Chief told me not to be so enthusiastic with starts! wait a minute or two and it saves the air compressors!

I never sailed a motor ship all steam but I experienced the same thing with pilots. T2's it took seven seconds to reverse the direction of the main motor. It did not take that long to pull or push the lever, but it took that long for the relays carrying propulsion voltage -located behind the switchboard - to do their things. When you are getting a new bell every five seconds what do you do?

The engineer or oiler keeping the bell book works up a sweat trying to keep up. T2's, unlike geared turbines, could go from ahead to astern in 7 seconds. The main motor just reverses. Geared turbines you needed to shut off the one throttle while opening the other throttle but you could do both at the same time. Regardless the main engine needed to wind down to zero prop rpm then wind up again.

Greg Hayden
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  #27  
Old 30th December 2019, 08:26
harry t. harry t. is offline
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in changing times

Emailing an old friend, a Ch/Engr. on changes we shared, and not for the better in the 80’s.

“…………. would agree with that, sure remember those two BP tankers the bosses took on, in no time they made a complete change of the E/Rm.staff, all ex. the sub-continent. It didn’t seem to bother them, the owners or charterers that discharging times on both ships had jumped from a respectable 30 hours to 104. There was no way I was going to volunteer to work a Gulf/E. Africa on either of them.
It was hard enough watching out for the Iranians in those days, one trip I was steaming in to discharge at a submarine mooring buoy at Mina Qaboos. The CPO was standing by at the ready to launch the work boat, if you fluffed it on the run in when backing up to this buoy with only a single anchor, you’d have to go back out and try again. From the ‘Stand By’ I gave the usual rings on the telegraph to reduce speed. Instead of her now going dead slow she was still bowling along at full sea speed. So, it was back out to sea thru’ a jam-packed anchorage. Same business as you experienced, my old Ch/Engr Tony, replaced by an Indian “driver” earlier that year, but on this trip the crew manager had supplied a certificated Chief Engineer from the Bombay pool. I arrived on the control platform to find the ‘driver’ just sat on his stool watching, but saying nothing to this bloke who had taken over ‘his’ engine room. You could smell the ‘fear’ off this new arrival. A good kick took the stool from under the driver, unkindly, I told him to answer the bloody telegraphs. Later, he was back to his old self, a happy chappie, when he got his old job back.
Come to think of it, some of the worst/more dangerous imposters had bought their tickets in Malta (same, same- recognised by the UK), HM Customs had …….……..”
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  #28  
Old 4th January 2020, 19:57
Kevin Robertson Kevin Robertson is offline  
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Understanding modern technology and ship handling

The Captains who con these vessels - and I agree some are behemoths (vessels not Captains) - are extremely well qualified as ship handlers, as well as having the necessary qualifications and sea time to be a Captain. Their "ship handling" training is updated regularly and assessed regularly

The kit on the bridge is not limited to only 5 RADAR (including Bow and Stern RADAR), but but up to 5 GPS (high accuracy), CCTV, multi wind sensors and at least 2 echo sounders. All are integrated into screens that give a clear picture of what is going on.

There will also be 3-4 other bridge officers AND a pilot on board, feeding information to the Captain. Until a MAIB report comes out we can all but speculate, but I would put money on either a temporary system or propulsion failure. This is not a "Costa" incident
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  #29  
Old 5th January 2020, 03:55
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kewl dude kewl dude is offline  
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Captain Albert in his blogs now and then attaches screen shots:

Screenshot20171018145115-E.jpg
DSC05854-E.jpg

20191119-19-nov-2019-blog-5- duckfoot-E.jpg
This is the - duckfoot - of the Koningsdam which is a sort of spoiler that pushes the stern onto the water and that improves the fuel efficiency.

20100808-bridge-team-worrying-about-green-ice-E.jpg
When Captain Albert was captain of Prinsendam 2010.

2018-nov-28-blog-1-Bridge Team with all the officers present-E.jpg

Wasn't there a sudden burst of 30+ knot winds at that Mexican crash?

Attached:
Screenshot20171018145115-E.jpg (246.0 KB)
DSC05854-E.jpg (111.2 KB)
20191119-19-nov-2019-blog-5- duckfoot-E.jpg (128.0 KB)
20100808-bridge-team-worrying-about-green-ice-E.jpg (61.2 KB)
2018-nov-28-blog-1-Bridge Team with all the officers present-E.jpg (86.4 KB)

Greg Hayden
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  #30  
Old 5th January 2020, 08:23
harry t. harry t. is offline
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Understanding modern technology and ship handling

in my experience owners will only fit this expensive equipment when its deemed absolutely necessary, as stated, but if the man in command lets his dick take charge, such as in the ”Costa” incident, all is lost. Many years ago, at a reception celebrating the maiden voyage, the technical director overheard the master make some disparaging remarks about newly fitted “aids to navigation”. – returning to the UK the 2nd radar and an ice facsimile were removed from the voyage expense disbursements, just because the captain claimed when talking to a guest, - he could smell the ice.
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  #31  
Old 5th January 2020, 11:11
seaman38 seaman38 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry t. View Post
just because the captain claimed when talking to a guest, - he could smell the ice.
He'd have a job doing that in today's fully enclosed bridges.

Reminds me of the time I joined a ship in drydock which had had a brand new True-Motion radar fitted (50's) and me with my brand new True motion certificate in hand, couldn't wait to get started, forget it !the radar was kept on Relative display as the Master didn't trust these new fangled things, and he was a relatively young man, late 40's, not only that we needed permission to put the radar on.

Next ship had no radar, no gyro, no auto pilot, duff echo sounder and D/F, Columbus would have been proud of us.

But would I do it all again? you bet your bottom dollar I would, what the results would be I hate to imagine
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  #32  
Old 5th January 2020, 12:18
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Ron Stringer Ron Stringer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seaman38 View Post
Reminds me of the time I joined a ship in drydock which had had a brand new True-Motion radar fitted (50's) and me with my brand new True motion certificate in hand, couldn't wait to get started, forget it !the radar was kept on Relative display as the Master didn't trust these new fangled things, and he was a relatively young man...
He may have had good reason to distrust True Motion radars of the time ... see post #28 here.
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  #33  
Old 5th January 2020, 12:48
harry t. harry t. is offline
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Understanding modern technology and ship handling

Quote:
Originally Posted by seaman38 View Post
not only that we needed permission to put the radar on.
Next ship had no radar, no gyro, no auto pilot, duff echo sounder and D/F, Columbus would have been proud of us.

But would I do it all again? you bet your bottom dollar I would, what the results would be I hate to imagine

indeed, I've been with old boys like that. They worried a fuse might blow -'then where would you be?'
Looking at any one of a number of vids on utube, some of the misfortunes experienced when berthing, particularly at Caribbean finger piers, could have been avoided. It’s all very well having extra navigational aids and the extra staff (most are superfluous in any case) to feed information info to El Capitano or a pilot. It’s what he/they do with this info.- no matter how little or how much. The most recent vid of a cruise liner coming in to berth, port side too, with the port anchor underfoot, didn’t require much imagination to guess he was going to wreck the pier, and cause some damage (specially the paintwork) to his ship. Simply, what was in the man’s mind that possessed him to order the dropping of the wrong anchor in the 1st place? Any experienced ship master will use ’his own good judgement’, always.
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Last edited by harry t.; 5th January 2020 at 13:06..
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  #34  
Old 5th January 2020, 14:16
seaman38 seaman38 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Stringer View Post
He may have had good reason to distrust True Motion radars of the time ... see post #28 here.
I do take the point you are making, however most Masters, 1/m in the 50's did not have radar tickets, it not being compulsory at their time of sitting for their certificates of competency and mis read the information on the PPI (self also guilty), it is only after a radar course that you learn to correctly plot the target. I have sailed with Masters who did ask a lowly 3/m to explain the PPI target plot. The point I was making is that the company had spent a lot of money installing that new equipment, surely it would have been prudent for the company to have sent the Master and/or C/O on a radar course during the drydocking, the school was in the same city.

When I became a Supt I requested the owners (at owner's expense) to send all their Masters and C/O on radar courses if they did not have a certificate, which surprisingly they did.
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