STORK HOTLo - Ships Nostalgia
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  #1  
Old 12th October 2007, 13:47
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STORK HOTLo

I have just been kindly sent a valuable piece of information on the engine of MV ELYSIA,
which I will correct on my web page on her.
Please can anyone offer any description on the STORK type HOTLo slow speed 2 stroke
Single Acting oil engine. It was manufactured under licence by Fairfield-Rowan. Apparently
they only built two of these engines before they lost the licence.
Apparently the other engine was installed in the sister ship which ended up with
Swires of Hong Kong's as either the Woo Sung or the Foo Chow. Please can anyone
help with the original name of the sister ship?
Best Wishes, Raymond
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  #2  
Old 12th October 2007, 21:51
Joe Freeman Joe Freeman is offline  
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Hi Raymond, I may be able answer your question. Fairfield-Rowan did build a STORK engine for the MV SIDONIA which was built in Holland. This engine was assembled and tested at David Rowan's engine shop in Finnieston. I believe the engine number was 797 and it was a six cylinder four valve reversing engine with separate cams for Ahead and Astern. The engine was originally contracted to Fairfield Engine works in Govan and was transferred to Rowan's in exchange for a 10RD76 Sulzer engine for Ben Line Steamers MV Benvalla. The testing capacity at Rowan's was limited by the cooling water capacity for the Dynamometer and engine cooling. This was just about the time David Rowan and Fairfield amalgamated in 1963. I was not aware that Fairfield- Rowan ever built another STORK engine. I was transferred from Rowan's engine shop tp Fairfield's shortly after the Sidonia engine was tested and I lost track of what was built after that time.
Most of the main engine components came from the Stork Works in Holland. The Fuel Pump casings and Reversing gear were machined at Rowans I know because I assembled them. The Cylinder Heads were individual four valve poppet type valves. The cylinders walls were chrome plated and were split for ease of inspection and replacement. I believe the Turbochargers were Brown & Boveri. One unique thing that I remember was on top of each crosshead there was a small lever driven piston oil pump that delivered about 50cc of high press oil into each lower crosshead bearing just as it reached TDC. I also installed some cable controls to the governor I think.
Beyond that she was a sweet running engine on the test bed and as far as I remember the test engineers from Holland were quite satisfied with the performance.
I hope this helps your quest and let me know what you have found out about the other engine.
Regards,
Joe Freeman.

Last edited by Joe Freeman; 13th October 2007 at 02:49..
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  #3  
Old 12th October 2007, 23:54
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Hi Joe and thank you indeed ... straight from the "horse's mouth" as it were.
I have no reason to doubt the information I was given, as the gentleman worked on the ship on that engine when the ELYSIA was STRATHAVOCH.
It is rare to be able to find such first hand information like yours.
Best Wishes, Raymond
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  #4  
Old 13th October 2007, 02:52
Joe Freeman Joe Freeman is offline  
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Hi Raymond I would be interested to know what information that you have on the ELYSIA's engine and where it was built.
Joe.
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  #5  
Old 13th October 2007, 03:56
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Hi Joe,
Because of the connection with Athel, I have a page on ELYSIA, and
I have a note as to her engines. I received an email correcting the
information that I had been given previously ... He writes ...
I was a young 4th engineer on this vessel (MV Strathavoch) from July to
December in 1977.
I would like to make a correction for this ships details.
She was in fact powered by a STORK type HOTLo slow speed 2 stroke Single
Acting oil engine manufactured under licence by Fairfield-Rowan.
This was an excellent engine with a number of truly outstanding features
which unfortunately were compromised by the licencee. I believe they only
built two of these engines before they lost the licence. This was about the
time they went out of business.

That is all that I have, at the moment.
Best Wishes, Raymond
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  #6  
Old 13th October 2007, 13:50
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Hello again Joe,
I have passed on the replies and from the earlier thread on the sisters.
Alistair Stevenson Writes ...
I am facinated by the history.
The STORK engine I sailed with was as described by Joe Freeman.

Where Strathavoch's engine differed from a Stork built engine was in some details.

For example the crosshead bearings were of standard "marine type" with two seperate
"bottom halves". However they were fitted with Stork high pressure pumps.

A genuine Stork had a one piece "bottom half" which was unique at the time.

In addition the removeable lower section of cylinder liner which was used for
inspection and piston ring changes was a plain stepped joint whereas a Stork
built engine had a wave joint.

Other differences were minor but infuriating. One I remember well was found after
opening up No 5 'bottom end' bearing for survey. Routine job, follow instructions
in the manual. These were genuine Stork and excellent.
On inspection the bearing was found to be scuffed. Basically the clearance had
been set too tight on an earlier occasion. The surveyor was not concerned about
it and only required it to be cleaned up. All went well until we had to 'blue in' the
bottom half which required it to be turned over and lowered on to the crankpin.
No lifting holes, which the manual clearly showed! To cut a long story short it
caused us a great deal of trouble as these bearings were massive and a
'Heath-Robinson' device had to be made up in order to do the job.

On inspection, none of the other 'bottom ends' had them either. The Chief was incandescent!

All in all it was an excellent engine and for the life of me I cannot understand why
it was not more popular. To my mind it completely outclassed the contemporary
RD Sulzer and gave certainly gave B&W something to ponder over.

Nedlloyd had a number of HOTLo engines in their fleet which gave first class
service according to the engineers I met.


Another fascinating piece of history.
Best Wishes, Raymond
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  #7  
Old 14th October 2007, 04:48
Joe Freeman Joe Freeman is offline  
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Hi Raymond. I have been racking my brain to try and remember more about that particular engine. I think that the bed plate was machined at Rowan's as they had a very long ASQUITH double headed milling table that could accomodate the complete six cylinder bed plate assembly. The support columns may have been machined at Fairfields along with the Cylinder blocks.
I do remember quite a number of large crates from Holland being stored in the old Diesel shop. Amazingly all the components seemed to be assembled without to much actual fitting. As I mentioned before I was transferred from Rowan's shortly after testing of the engine was completed and amalgamation of the two companies had just taken place. It is possible that another STORK engine was built at Rowan's after I left. I do know that a company called "Wards" was evaluating the machinery and premises for eventual sale and that a considerable amount of the machinery went to the Tyne shipyards and some to Fairfields and most likley the engine orders went with them.
I don't think that Rowan's or Fairfield-Rowan lost their Manufacturing Licence through any inability to perform according to the Licence. More likley due to the policy and inability of the Government of the day, as we are all aware of the rapid decline of shipbuilding orders starting in the late sixties and seventies.
I have very few specifications on the this STORK engine and I wonder what the designation HOTLo stands for. The Bore and stroke was 750mm. X 1600mm. but I have no idea about the BHP or RPM. Possibly your friend could help with these details.
Regards.
Joe.
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  #8  
Old 14th October 2007, 13:19
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Thank you again .. there is precious little on the net concerning
the engine, so the accumulated information you have remembered
is more than useful. I will now be able to find more and I will get
back to you again. My page has been updated as a "story so far".
Best Wishes, Raymond
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  #9  
Old 14th October 2007, 14:02
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The P&O history sheet gives 9,000 bhp

http://portal.pohub.com/pls/pogprtl/....pdf?p_id=1653

also found the Stork Hotlo brochure scanned on
http://www.nerood.nl/Nedlloyd_Pagina...hotlo_2007.htm
ok so it's in Dutch ... thankfully I have the dictionary handy.

All Best, Raymond

Last edited by treeve; 14th October 2007 at 14:24..
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  #10  
Old 14th October 2007, 14:46
K urgess K urgess is offline
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Give me a couple of hours and I can post some details in English from "Motor Ship".
Plus a bit later will be able to let you have a PDF of the article by email if you want it.

Regards
Kris
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  #11  
Old 14th October 2007, 15:24
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That is very kind of you Kris.
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  #12  
Old 14th October 2007, 17:42
K urgess K urgess is offline
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Here are the first 5 illustrations from the Stork article in "The Motor Ship" Reference Book 20th Edition.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Stork Hotlo detail - 001s.jpg (106.5 KB, 23 views)
File Type: jpg Stork Hotlo detail - 002s.jpg (155.5 KB, 37 views)
File Type: jpg Stork Hotlo detail - 003s.jpg (89.1 KB, 34 views)
File Type: jpg Stork Hotlo detail - 004s.jpg (115.5 KB, 24 views)
File Type: jpg Stork Hotlo detail - 005s.jpg (163.1 KB, 35 views)
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  #13  
Old 14th October 2007, 17:53
K urgess K urgess is offline
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The table gives details of all Stork engines in production at the publication date of 1960.

The advert is interesting in that it gives the names of the agents.

If anyone wants a copy of the complete article please send me a PM with email address and I'll send the PDF when it's done.

Cheers
Kris
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Stork Hotlo detail - 006s.jpg (176.3 KB, 24 views)
File Type: jpg Stork advert - 001s.jpg (95.9 KB, 26 views)
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  #14  
Old 14th October 2007, 18:34
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Amazing stuff ... many thanks.
Best Wishes, Raymond
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  #15  
Old 18th October 2007, 02:03
Joe Freeman Joe Freeman is offline  
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Hi Raymond I have just received some information from a good source that Rowan's or under the new name of Fairfield-Rowan only built one STORK 6cyl. engine. He seems to think the other engine was built by Geo. Clark of Sunderland. Possibly an exchange with the Fairfield-Rowan name.
I will be returning to Scotland in Novenber for a short trip and I will make further enquiries regarding these conflicting details.

Last edited by Joe Freeman; 18th October 2007 at 21:10..
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  #16  
Old 18th October 2007, 02:10
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Hi Joe, that would be good ... I envy you going to Scotland,
but seriously since the subject has come up, I have to
a) get it right, and
b) not offend Alistair Stevenson.
I have made some notes on the relevant web page, and my
policy is to get as much as is reasonably possible right.
I really appreciate the help you and Kris have given.
Best Wishes, Raymond
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  #17  
Old 16th November 2007, 19:57
sirjohn sirjohn is offline  
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Memories of the Stork engine

Hello all who have written about the Stork engine.
You input has brought back memories when I joined the Holsworthy Beacon as 4th. engineer, my first as forth, on her maiden voyage.
She was built in Holland and the main engine was a 6 cyl. Dutch Stork with 3 Brown Bovari turbo charges. Being forth and keeping the Chiefs watch I had the privilege of helping the guaranty engineer from Storks, with his adjustments during the voyage.
I still have the indicator diagrams I took with the calculations taken on the 1st. June 1962, total IHP then was 6983 fuel 0.318 lb/IHP/hr. engine at 107.7 RPM, turbo RPM 7050. If you would like copies mail me.
The problems we encountered whilst I sailed on the Holsworthy were, oil leakage att the engine bed/crankcase joints, excessive oil collection in the scavenge which resulted in a scavenge fire in the middle of the Pacific, and also in the Pacific, the chain which lifted the pushrods from their cams broke, could not understand why the engine stopped and would only go astern. Other mishaps, a stuck start valve, of all places leaving Dunkirk in a mine swept passage, One of the exhaust valve cages not seating properly repaired in Japan (exhaust valves were a constant problem the valve seating having to be welded and machined) and then there was the time we did a hammer test and a crankcase tie rod was extremely loose. Fortunately most studs were tightened by hydraulic pump, removing the piston required a block and tackle to lift the spanner for the piston rod nut and a 28 lb sledgehammer.
I have a few photos of the engine room showing spare cylinder head and cylinder.
Thanks for the memories.
sirjohn
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  #18  
Old 16th November 2007, 22:36
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Looks like a few teething problems, but nothing a sledgehammer could
not sort out ... sounds like the TV engineer. I hope you can post the
pictures you have? Best Wishes, Raymond
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  #19  
Old 19th November 2007, 01:13
Joe Freeman Joe Freeman is offline  
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Great story sirjohn I would love to see the pictures as there does not seem to be many around.
Thanks,
Joe.
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  #20  
Old 19th November 2007, 01:58
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no wonder if they have all been hit with sledgehammers !! :-)
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  #21  
Old 19th November 2007, 16:02
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HOTLo stands for “Hesselman Omkeerbaar Twee-takt Langspoeling Oplading” The HOT bit translates as Hesselman Reversible Two-stroke but I can’t find a translation for Langspoeling Oplading. I suspect, though, that it means either long-stroke or slow-speed. Hesselman refers to the combustion chamber design.
There was an alternative meaning coined by Dutch engineers: “Het Onding Trilt en Lekt Ontzettend” which, by pushing my knowledge of Dutch to the limit, I take to stand for something like “The heap of junk blows and leaks dreadfully”. No doubt our Dutch friends can confirm or correct me on that.
According to my old Lloyd's Registers, the 6-cylinder model used in Sidonia and Elysia was the Stork HOTLo 75/160 rated at 9,000 bhp. At 1,500bhp per cylinder this was an advance on the model mentioned in Marconi Sahib's Motor Ship Reference Book from 1960 (see above). I have the 1965 edition, which gives details for the HOTLo 75/160H. That has a per cylinder output of 1600bhp. So they could have been derated versions of the 75/160H or an earlier model in-between the one in the 1960 book and mine. Sidonia was built in 1961; Elysia in 1965

Last edited by bobs; 19th November 2007 at 16:05..
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  #22  
Old 19th November 2007, 16:44
whiskey johnny whiskey johnny is offline  
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hi bobs

your translation is perfect langsspoeling is long stroke
why not taking up dutch lessons in wintertime
yours jan
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  #23  
Old 19th November 2007, 18:44
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Brilliant ... thanks for the meaning of HOTLo; and the working title !!!
Funniest thing I have read in ages. Best Wishes, Raymond
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  #24  
Old 20th November 2007, 00:27
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Thanks for your kind words, Jan. I do understand Dutch quite well (up to a point) and, as a Scotsman, I can actually pronounce your 'g' sound - and can even pass the 'Scheveningen' pronunciation test! Starting in the 1960s I was a regular visitor to Maassluis for shipspotting on the Nieuw Waterweg, which is where I learned your language. I apparently speak Dutch with a distinct Rotterdam accent, as I was to be told later when I found myself visiting the shipyards around Groningen.
Later I went to night school to learn Duits (German) and since then I have got the two mixed up at times. I discovered that you guys don't like that very much. Meanwhile I found Germans thinking I was speaking Plattdeutsch!
Also, I found that speaking Dutch in Nederland was bit of a waste of effort because every time I tried it, I got the reply in English!
Raymond: glad to have been of service. I never was a marine engineer but I was a shipspotter who became technical editor of a shipping magazine and got to learn, at least a bit, about probably more types of engine than most ships' engineers do in their seagoing careers. However, though I might be able to take one apart, I'd never get it back together again.
Now here's a bit of useless information for you: If you are ever talking to a Dutchman about a Stork engine, you will notice that he pronounces it "Storruk"!
Tot siens and cheers!
Bob Scott
PS: I have come across a site on the net that says the last surviving ship with a HOTLo is soon to go to the breakers. And Jan: I like your call-sign, except that Whiskey is Irish. I prefer Scotch Whisky (with neither e nor anything else in it.

Last edited by bobs; 20th November 2007 at 00:32..
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  #25  
Old 20th November 2007, 23:28
sirjohn sirjohn is offline  
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Some Engineroom photos

Hi,
I have these two photos at hand the rest I will have to dig out from my files.
The one photo shows us having completed a hammer test, the oil runing down is from the open upper crankcase door. A glimpse can be seen of the cross head with the piston rod nut. The 6 ft. long ring spanner, would be lifted into place with a block and and tackle. A chain block would take up the tension on the spanner while hitting the spanner with the sledgehammer. Of course the piston would be at TDC not as seen BDC. With the nut slack a plank, that had a spring to hold the weight of the nut, would be placed in position so that the nut could be safely removed and slid out to the platform.
The second photo is of the engine top with the spare cylinder and cylinder head to starboard. As can be seen the rocker arms of No. 2 cyl. are removed for access to the exhaust valves, which were a regular maintenance item.
Finally a scannade picture of IHP calculation for No. 6 unit.
I hope you have pleasure from these photos and I hope to dig out the others soon.
Cheers
sirjohn
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Holsworthycrankcase.jpg (72.8 KB, 49 views)
File Type: jpg holsworthyenginroom.jpg (63.2 KB, 50 views)
File Type: jpg holsworthyindicatorcard1.jpg (59.0 KB, 37 views)

Last edited by sirjohn; 21st November 2007 at 14:34..
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