The Ellerman Fleet in WW2 - Ships Nostalgia
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The Ellerman Fleet in WW2

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Old 8th October 2016, 05:15
mikekhh mikekhh is offline  
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Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
Active: 1971 - 2014
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
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The Ellerman Fleet in WW2

There were 79 Ellerman “City” Ships at the start of World War 2; a further 5 “City” Ships were completed during the war and 40 “City” Ships were lost.

79 Ellerman “City” Ships at the beginning of WW2:-
Adelaide (II) 1920
Agra (III) 1936
Athens (III) 1923
Auckland (I) 1921 ex Weissenfels 1914
Bagdad (I) 1920
Barcelona (I) 1930
Baroda (II) 1918
Bath (I) 1926
Bedford (I) 1924
Benares (V) 1936
Birmingham (II) 1917
Bombay (IV) 1937
Brisbane (II) 1920
Cairo (I) 1915
Canberra (I) 1927
Canterbury (II) 1922
Canton (II) 1916
Cape Town (I) 1937
Cardiff (I) 1926 ex Langton Hall 1918
Christchurch (I) 1930 ex Lorenzo 1930/1915
Christiania (I) 1921
Corinth (IV) 1918
Delhi (IV) 1925
Derby (I) 1927 ex Karonga 1921
Dieppe (I) 1929
Dundee (II) 1926 ex Sandon Hall 1921
Dunkirk (I) 1912
Durban (I) 1921
Eastbourne (I) 1923
Edinburgh (V) 1938
Evansville (I) 1922
Exeter (I) 1914
Florence (III) 1918
Glasgow (IV) 1920
Guildford (I) 1927 ex Romeo 1919
Hankow (II) 1915
Hereford (I) 1927
Hong Kong (I) 1924 ex Colorado 1924
Johannesburg (I) 1926 ex Melford Hall 1920
Karachi (II) 1937
Keelung (I) 1936 ex Keelung 1936/1919
Khios (II) 1925
Kimberley (I) 1925
Kobe (I) 1927
Lancaster (I) 1924
Leicester (I) 1926
Lille (I) 1928
Lincoln (II) 1938
London (IV) 1907
Lyons (I) 1926
Manchester (IV) 1935
Mandalay (I) 1925
Manila (I) 1916
Marseilles (I) 1913
Melbourne (I) 1919
Mobile (I) renamed 1927 ex Kentucky 1912
Nagpur (II) 1922
Newcastle (I) 1915
Norwich (I) 1913
Oran (I) 1915
Oxford (III) 1926
Paris (III) 1922
Perth (IV) 1926 ex Kandahar 1913
Pittsburg (I) 1922
Pretoria (II) 1937
Rangoon (I) 1914
Ripon (I) 1934 ex Lepanto 1934/1915
Roubaix (I) 1928
Shanghai (II) 1917
Simla (I) 1921
Singapore (I) 1923
Sydney (II) 1930
Tokio (I) 1921
Venice (III) 1924
Wellington (I) 1925
Winchester (II) 1917
Windsor (I) 1926 ex Knaresbro' 1923
Worcester (I) 1927
Yokohama (I) 1922

5 Ellerman “City” Ships built during WW2:-
Bristol (II) completed January 1943
Calcutta (V) completed August 1940
Chester (II) completed March 1944
Durham (II) completed March 1945
Madras (V) completed February 1945

44 Ellerman “City” Ships survived World War 2, namely:-
Agra (III) 1936
Auckland (I) 1921 ex Weissenfels 1914
Barcelona (I) 1930
Bristol (II) completed January 1943
Calcutta (V) completed August 1940
Canberra (I) 1927
Canterbury (II) 1922
Cape Town (I) 1937
Chester (II) completed March 1944
Christiania (I) 1921
Delhi (IV) 1925
Derby (I) 1927 ex Karonga 1921
Dieppe (I) 1929
Dundee (II) 1926 ex Sandon Hall 1921
Dunkirk (I) 1912
Durban (I) 1921 requisitioned 17 September 1939 & renamed HMS Brutus, renamed Durban 1942 ex HMS Brutus 1942 ex C/o Durban 1939/1921
Durham (II) completed March 1945
Eastbourne (I) 1923
Edinburgh (V) 1938
Evansville (I) 1922
Exeter (I) 1914
Florence (III) 1918
Glasgow (IV) 1920
Hereford (I) 1927
Hong Kong (I) 1924 ex Colorado 1924
Keelung (I) 1936 ex Keelung 1936/1919
Khios (II) 1925
Kimberley (I) 1925
Lancaster (I) 1924
Leicester (I) 1926
Lille (I) 1928
Lincoln (II) 1938
London (IV) 1907
Lyons (I) 1926
Madras (V) completed February 1945
Newcastle (I) 1915
Norwich (I) 1913
Paris (III) 1922
Rangoon (I) 1914
Sydney (II) 1930
Tokio (I) 1921
Windsor (I) 1926 ex Knaresbro' 1923
Worcester (I) 1927
Yokohama (I) 1922

40 Ellerman “City” Ships did not survive World War 2 as follows:-
Lost to collision (1)
Bedford (I) 1924 - lost on 30 December 1940 in position 60 03N 023 01W, West of Iceland (MSI), 62N 023 W, South of Iceland (EDFH), when the Commodore’s ship in the inward bound Convoy SL.58, when in collision with Bodnant of Elder Dempster’s, which was in the outward bound Convoy OB.264; it happened in darkness and the weather at the time was thick fog with a force 7 wind; she sank in 20 seconds and had been carrying 7.5 million ammunition cartridges, which made her the largest munitions loss up to then in the War – yes, the Admiralty had managed to route two convoys on nigh on opposite courses together
Wrecked / Stranded (3)
Pittsburg (I) 1922 - stranded & lost 11 January 1942
11th January 1942 stranded and lost on a reef at the entrance to Alexandria Harbour, in The Great Pass having departed Port Said on 10 January 1942,
Hankow (II) 1915 - 18th December 1942 when on voyage from Liverpool to Durban and Beira she stranded and wrecked in fog on rocks on South Point, in Danger Bay, 4 miles North of Saldanha Bay, South Africa. She was carrying 2.5 million pounds in unsigned Bank of England notes intended for paying British troops in the Middle East. All the money was later destroyed because of water damage. Insurance paid out 3000 pounds on "printed paper" for the notes. She was also carrying a large cargo of war material.
Marseilles (I) 1913 – 21 January 1943 stranded when one mile off Batticaloa, Ceylon, when bound from Liverpool to Madras and Calcutta with a general cargo; April 1943 an attempt to refloat her failed; broken up in 1947
Lost to mine(s) (2)
Birmingham (II) 1917 - 16th of August 1940 when she was 115 (T) x 5.5 miles from Spurn Point she was sunk by a mine in position 53 32 26 N 000 15 30 E; she had departed Methil on 15 August 1940 in Convoy FS.253 and having parted the convoy for Hull entered the two cable wide swept channel and promptly hit a mine; her cargo was part salved in 1950
Kobe (I) 1927 ex Malvernian 1924 – sunk on 19 December 1939 off Yarmouth, near Cross Sand Buoy, in position 52 35N 001 59E by a mine laid by U-60 on 17 December 1939; she had departed The Tyne on 18 December 1939 in Convoy FS.56; her Master was William Scott Craig
Lost to Surface Raider (1)
Bagdad (I) 1920 ex Geirfels 1919 - Sunk on 11 July 1940 in The Indian Ocean, in position 00 16S 090 00E by the German Auxiliary Cruiser, ATLANTIS, having departed Lourenco Marques on 28 June 1940; note both Seedies and BVLAS incorrectly spell the ship’s name as CITY OF BAGHDAD
Lost to Aircraft (5)
Brisbane (II) 1920 - 02 August 1940 she was in the Thames Estuary bound from Australia to London and Glasgow when bombed by German aircraft and went ashore on South Long Sand where she burned until 05th August 1940; she had departed Methil on 30 June 1940 in Convoy FS.237; her cargo of mainly lead ignots were later salved
Mobile (I) renamed 1927 ex Kentucky 1912 - 16 September 1940 sunk by aircraft in The Irish Sea, in position 54 18.3N 005 16.3W, having sailed Independently from The Clyde on 15 September 1940 for Liverpool
Roubaix (I) 1928 - bombed and damaged on 06 April 1941 at Piraeus, by aircraft; sank on 07 April 1941 after CLAN FRASER exploded; previously had been bombed and damaged on 20 October 1940 when in Alexandria Dock, Liverpool by aircraft
Karachi (II) 1937 – 12 April 1941 after disembarking troops and discharging stores at the Greek port of Volos, she was instructed to proceed to sea and obtain orders from a destroyer at Oreus where the boom defence was situated. The Master, Captain Melville, could find no such destroyer and after dodging about in the vicinity all night, felt compelled to return to Volos. 13 April 1941 as he was about to anchor in the harbour the ship was attacked by some 17 enemy bombers. With machine guns firing they came from all directions dropping about 20 bombs, all of which were near misses, but they fractured the main sea water inlet to the engine room and started the side plating. She began to take water and within an hour she had been abandoned. Later, under cover of darkness, the European members of the crew returned to beach her with the assistance of Ellerman’s Destro which had just arrived in the port. However, a twisted rudder and a further attack by enemy aircraft made this virtually impossible and it was not until the following day (14 April 1941), with the assistance of a Greek destroyer, that she was finally beached. She was then again bombed on 15 April 1941 and hit and became a total loss.
For 10 days Captain Melville and his men walked and thumbed lifts in lorries and small craft in their flight south along with thousands of refugees fleeing in the path of the enemy. They eventually reached Athens where they were directed to Argos but somewhere along the way the European Officers became separated from their Indian shipmates.
On 01 May 1941 Captain Melville and his Officers reached Alexandria from Suda Bay and a few days later 25 members of the Indian crew arrived but the remaining 35 did not arrive. They were never seen of or heard of again.
Christchurch (I) 1930 ex Lorenzo 1930/1915 - Bombed and damaged on 21 March 1943 when in Convoy KMS.11G in position 39 35N 012 46W by aircraft; she sank on 22 March 1943 in position 38 42N 010 14W, having departed Milford Haven on 13 March 1943
Convoys (13)
Mandalay (I) 1925 – torpedoed and sunk on 17 October 1939 when in the unescorted Convoy HG.3, in The North Atlantic, some 360 miles WNW of Cape Finisterre, in position 44 57N 013 36W, by U-46, having departed Gibraltar on 13 October 1939; 4 submarines attacked this convoy and was the first instance of a U-boat pack, was at the time experimental but later became standard tactics until the strength of the escorts and aircraft cover made it suicidal; she was the first Ellerman vessel lost in WWII; her Master was Alexander Graham Melville
Benares (V) 1936 - torpedoed and sunk on 17 September 1940, when in Convoy OB.213, in The Northern Approaches, in position 56 43N 021 15W, by U-48, having departed Liverpool on 13 September 1943; her Master was Landles Nicoll
Simla (I) 1921 - torpedoed and sunk on 21 September 1940 (BVLAS and Lloyds)20 September 1940 at 2120 hours (CET)(Uboat), when in Convoy OB.216, in The North Atlantic, when 52 miles NW of Rathlin Island, by U-138; she remained afloat for a short time and sank in position 55 59N 008 16W (Uboat) 55 55N 008 20W (BVLAS and Lloyds), having departed The Clyde on 19 September 1940; her Master was Herbert Percival
Manchester (IV) 1935 - torpedoed, shelled and sunk on 28 February 1942 when 35 miles out from Tjilatjap to join Convoy SM.3 off Java in position 08 16S 108 52E, by the Japanese submarine, I-153
Oxford (III) 1926 – torpedoed and sunk on 15 June 1942, when in Convoy HG.84, West of Cape Finisterre, in position 43 42N 018 12W, by U-552, having departed Lisbon on 11 June 1942; her Master was Alfred Norbury; U-552 sank Thurso in the same attack
Manila (I) 1916 – torpedoed and damaged on 19 August 1942, when in Convoy SL.118, West of Cape Finisterre, in position 43 21N 018 20W, by U-406, and abandoned; the following day, 20 August 1942, she was re-boarded by part of the Crew but later broke in two, again abandoned, and sank; she had departed Freetown on 04 August 1942; her Master was Alfred Sutton Reay
Cardiff (I) 1926 ex Langton Hall 1918 - torpedoed and damaged on 28 August 1942, when in Convoy SL.199, in The North Atlantic, WNW of Lisbon, in position 40 20N 016 02W, by U-556; she remained afloat but foundered two days later and sank on 30 August 1942, having departed Freetown 14 August 1942; her Master was Robert Leonard Stewart
Perth (IV) 1926 ex Kandahar 1913 – torpedoed and damaged on 26 March 1943, when in Convoy MKS.10, when 52 miles West of Oran, in position 35 50N 001 41W, by U-431 but remained afloat; she was taken in tow by HMS MAN O’WAR; 27 March 1943 the rescue tug, HMS RESTIVE took over towing duties, but due to worsening weather she was beached on the same day South of Cape Figalo, Algeria, and became a total loss; she had departed Bone in ballast on 23 March 1943; her Master was John Blewitt
Note: newer research in May 2014 by Frans Beckers and Eric Zimmerman shows that she could not have been torpedoed by U-431 as earlier thought, but in fact was attacked by U-77, which was lost a few days later. The claims made by U-431 on 26 March 1943 cannot be confirmed from Allied reports
Guildford (I) 1927 ex Romeo 1919 – torpedoed and sunk on 27 March 1943, when in Convoy XT.7/1, off Derna, in position 33 00N 022 50E, by U-593, having departed Alexandria on 25 March 1943; her Master was Clifford Collard
Baroda (II) 1918 – torpedoed and damaged on 02 April 1943, when in Convoy NC.9, some 90 miles South of Luderitz Bay, South West Africa, in position 27 56S 015 21E, by U-509; being badly damaged she was abandoned and drifted ashore on 04 April 1943 in position 27 31S 015 19E; she became a total loss on 26 April 1943 after waves broke up the wreck; her Master was Charles Stuart Nelson
Singapore (I) 1923 – torpedoed and sunk on 01 May 1943, when in Convoy TS.37, some 75 miles SW of Freetown, in position 07 55N 014 16W, by U-515, having departed Takoradi on 26 April 1943; her Master was Alfred George Freeman
Venice (III) 1924 - torpedoed and sunk on 04 July 1943, when in Convoy KMS.18B, in The Mediterranean, in position 36 44N 001 31E (Lloyds) 36 44N 001 25E (U-Boat), some 10 miles North of Cape Tenes, Algeria, by U-409, having departed The Clyde on 24 June 1943; her Master was James Wyper. Note this loss was earlier attributed to U-375, but newer research shows that the ship was torpedoed one hour earlier and must have been hit by U-409, which was lost before being able to report its success
Oran (I) 1915 – torpedoed and damaged on 02 August 1943, when in Convoy CB.1, some 100 miles NE of Memba Bay, Tanganyika, in position 13 45S 041 16E, by U-196 having departed Durban on 26 July 1943; she was later scuttled with gunfire by HMS MASTERFUL; her Master was Frederick William Letton
Independent Sailings (15)
Nagpur (II) 1922 – torpedoed, machine gunned, shelled and torpedoed again on 29 April 1941, in The North Atlantic, some 600 miles West of Valentia Island, Ireland, in position 52 30N 026 00W, by U-75, having departed The Clyde on 25 April 1941; her Master was David Llewellyn Lloyd
Winchester (II) 1917 - torpedoed and sunk on 09 May 1941, having dispersed from Convoy OB.313 on 28 April 1941, in the North Atlantic, some 400 miles SSW of The Cape Verde Islands, in position 08 20N 026 14W, by U-103, having departed Liverpool on 22 April 1941; her Master was William Samuel Coughlan
Shanghai (II) 1917 - torpedoed, shelled and sunk after a chase of over 16 hours on 10 May 1941, having dispersed from Convoy OB.313 on 28 April 1941, in The Equatorial Atlantic, off St. Paul Rocks, in position 06 40N 027 50W, by U-103, having departed Oban on 23 April 1941; her Master was Arthur Frank Goring
Melbourne (I) 1919 – torpedoed, shelled and sunk, West of Barbados, in position 15 00N 054 40W, by U-506, having departed Cape Town on 23 April 1942; her Master was Harry George Thorne Booth
Wellington (I) 1925 – torpedoed and sunk on 21 August 1942 when SW of Freetown, in position 07 29N 014 40W, by U-506, having departed Mossel Bay on 06 August 1942; her Master was McDonald Martyn
Athens (III) 1923 – torpedoed and sunk on 08 October 1942, some 60 miles WNW of Cape Town, in position 33 40S 017 03E, by U-179 having departed Takoradi on 27 September 1942; her Master was James Albert Kinley
Johannesburg (I) 1926 ex Melford Hall 1920 - Torpedoed and sunk on 23 October 1942 in The Indian Ocean, some 80 miles ESE of East London, in position 33 20S 029 30E, by U-504, having departed Colombo on 06 October 1942; her Master was Walter Armour Owen
Cairo (I) 1915 - – torpedoed and sunk on 06 November 1942 in the South Atlantic, some 450 miles south of St. Helena, in position 23 30S 005 30W, by U-68, having departed Cape Town 31 October 1942; her Master was William A. Rogerson
Ripon (I) 1934 ex Lepanto 1934/1915 - torpedoed and sunk on 11 November 1942 in the Equatorial Atlantic about 90 miles NW of Georgetown, British Guiana, in position 08 40N 059 20W, by U-160, having departed Cape Town on 18 October 1942; her Master was John Edward Robinson
Corinth (IV) 1918 – torpedoed and damaged on 17 November 1942, North of Trinidad, in position 10 55N 061 01W, by U-508, having departed Pernambuco on 09 November 1942; she later foundered in position 10 52 30N 061 03 30W; her Master was George Johnston Law
Bath (I) 1926 - torpedoed and sunk on 02 December 1942 in the Equatorial Atlantic, NW of Georgetown, British Guiana in position 09 29N 059 35W (U-Boat) 09 29N 059 30W (Lloyds) by U-508, having departed Pernambuco on 23 November 1942; her Master was Thomas Victor Birkett
Bombay (IV) 1937 - torpedoed, shelled and sunk on 13 December 1942 in the Equatorial Atlantic, South of St. Paul Rocks, in position 02 43N 029 06W, by U-159, having departed Trinidad on 05 December 1942; her Master was Forbes Wyse Pemberthy
Pretoria (II) 1937 - torpedoed and sunk on 03 March 1943 in The North Atlantic, some 320 miles NW of The Azores, in position 42 39N 036 46W, by U-172, having departed New York on 27 February 1943; her Master was Frank Deighton
Canton (II) 1916 - torpedoed and sunk on 16 July 1943 in The Mozambique Channel, NE of Beira, in position 13 52N 041 10E, after a chase of some 18 hours, by U-178, having departed Beira on 14 July 1943; her Master was Edward Scrymgeour
Adelaide (II) 1920 - torpedoed, shelled and sunk on 30 March 1944 in The Indian Ocean, in position 12 01S 080 27E, by the Japanese submarine, I-8, having departed Karachi 21 March 1944; her Master was Captain Ricketts

There were 24 E & P ships (not named “City of”) at the start of World War 2; a further 1 Ship (not named “City of”) was completed during the war; 1 ship sold and 20 E&P ships (not named “City of”) were lost.
24 E&P Ships at the beginning of WW2:-
Algerian (III) 1924
Andalusian (III) 1918
Assyrian (I) 1920 ex Fritz 1914
Belgravian (II) 1937
Castilian (II) 1919
Corinthian (I) 1938
Cressado (I) 1919 ex Cressida 1919/1913
Darino (I) 1917
Destro (II) 1920
Dido (III) 1920
Egyptian (III) 1920
Estrellano (II) 1920
Fabian (II) 1919
Flaminian 1917
Florian (I) 1939
Ionian (I) 1938
Lesbian (III) 1923
Lisbon (III) 1920
Malvernian (II) 1937
Mardinian (II) 1919
Oporto (II) 1928
Palmella (II) 1920
Serbino (I) 1919
Volturno (I) 1928 ex Falernian (II) 1914

1 E&P Ships built during WW2:-
Pandorian (I) completed March 1940

1 E&P ship sold
Flaminian 1917 taken over by The Admiralty in September 1939 and renamed Empire Flaminian

4 E & P ships survived World War 2, namely:-
Algerian (III) 1924
Corinthian (I) 1938
Destro (II) 1920
Pandorian (I) 1940

20 Ellerman & Papayanni Ships did not survive World War 2 as follows:-
Lost to collision (1)
Cressado (I) – lost on 08 May 1942 when in collision with HMS Pozarica 11 miles off The Skerries when in Convoy HG.82; HMS Pozarica was repaired in Belfast after the collision in time for her to join the infamous convoy, PQ.17
Wrecked / Stranded (2)
Lisbon (III) – 30 October 1940 Wrecked 1mile East of Rattray Head when in Convoy WN.27
Castilian (II) – 12 February 1943 wrecked en-route Manchester to Lisbon, in
fog, at night, on the East Platters by The Skerries Light, Anglesey
Captured & Destroyed by Vicy French(1)
Lesbian (III) – detained at Beirut by the French on 23 June 1940 and destroyed there by the Vichy French in June 1941
Captured (1)
Dido (III) – 17 September 1939 picked up 23 Officers and 195 Ratings from HMS Courageous when she was torpedoed by U-29. Dido was escorted to Liverpool by HMS Intrepid; 27 January 1940 whilst in Convoy SA.27 ran aground off Oeussant. She was brought into Brest on 30 January 1940; 18 June 1940 abandoned by her Crew at Brest on the capitulation of France; 25 April 1941 taken over by German forces after confiscation by order of the
Hamburg Prize Court and later used as German naval auxiliary, Dorpat, under
the management of Leth & Co., Hamburg; August 1941 commissioned as a Kriegsmarine
trials vessel; 11 April 1943 sank after striking a mine off Aarhus; later refloated and repaired.
23 February 1944 blown up by the Danish Resistance and sank while under repair at Aalborg;
later refloated and repairs completed; October 1944 returned to service; 03 May 1945
bombed by Allied aircraft in the Great Belt off Langeland, but later refloated and taken to
Keil where she was found sunk at the end of WW2; Refloated by Em. Z. Svitzer but remained
idle as Ellerman Lines Ltd., were no longer interested in her; 1949 sold by Salvors to Rudolf
W. Rostedt Varustamo-Rederi, of Abo; repaired and returned to service and renamed Leila;
November 1963 sold for scrapping in Finland; 20 November 1963 demolition commenced by
Wihuri Yhtyma O/Y-Teijon Tehtaat at Mathildedahl
Lost to mine(s) (1)
Ionian (I) – 29 November 1939 when in Convoy FN.43 struck a mine laid on 21 November 1939 by U-20 when 1.5 miles 132 degrees x 1.5 miles from Newarp Lightship. The ship was abandoned 340 degrees x 4 miles from the lightship and sank in 52 45.15N 001 56.15E. Her Master was William Smith
Lost to Aircraft (2)
Malvernian (II) – 1940 requisitioned by the Admiralty and armed for use as the Ocean Boarding Vessel and renamed HMS Malvernian
11 July 1941 Bombed by German aircraft off Spain; set on fire and put out of
action; abandoned; 21 July 1941 32 Crew reached Corunna; 22 July 1941 25 Crew reached
Vigo, the remainder of the survivors were captured by German minesweepers when
nearing land
Volturno (I) – 23 June 1943 bombed by German aircraft 10 miles WNW of Capt St. Vincent, Southern Portugal. (DH); sank 24 June 1943
Convoys (8)
Mardinian (II) – torpedoed and sunk on 09 September 1940, when in Convoy SC.2, some 100 miles NNW of Bloody Foreland, in position 56 37N 009 00W, by U-28, having departed Sydney, CB, on 25 August 1940; her Master was Joseph Every
Assyrian (I) – torpedoed and sunk on 19 October 1940, when Commodore’s (Vice-Admiral Lachlan DI MacKinnon, CB, CVO, RN) ship in Convoy SC.7, some 102 miles WxN of Barra Head, in position 57 12N 010 43W, by U-101, having departed Sydney, CB, on 05 October 1940; her Master was Reginald Sanderson Kearon
Estrellano (II) – torpedoed and sunk on 09 February 1941, when in Convoy HG.53, some 160 miles SW of Cape St. Vincent, in position 35 53N 013 13W, by U-37, having departed Gibraltar on 06 February 1941; her Master was Fred Bird
Andalusian (III) – torpedoed and sunk on 17 March 1941, when in Convoy SL.68, some 110 miles East of The Cape Verde Islands, in position 15 50N 020 42W, by U-106, having departed Freetown on 13 March 1941; her Master was Harry Bourne McHugh
Bourne McHugh
Belgravian (II) – torpedoed and sunk on 05 August 1941, when in Convoy SL.81, West of Ireland, in position 53 03N 015 54W, by U-372, having departed Freetown on 15 July 1941; her Master was Reginald Sanderson Kearon, OBE
Serbino (I) – torpedoed and sunk on 21 October 1941, when in Convoy SL.89, West of Fastnet, in position 51 10N 019 20W, by U-82, having departed Freetown on 05 October 1941; her Master was Lawrence Edwin Brooks
Egyptian (III) – torpedoed and sunk on 06 March 1943, when in Convoy SC.121, SSE of Cape Farewell, in position 56 25N 037 38W, by U-230, having departed New York City on 23 February 1943; her Master was Dominic Vincent Murphy
Oporto (II) – torpedoed and sunk on 13 March 1943, when in Convoy OS.44, some 190 miles West of Cape Finisterre, in position 42 45N 013 31W, by U-107, having departed Liverpool on 06 March 1943; her Master was Fred Bird
Independent Sailings (4)
Darino (I) – torpedoed and sunk (first three torpedoes missed) on 19 November 1939, West of Cape Ortegal, in position 44 12N 011 07W, by U-41, when on passage from Oporto to Liverpool; her Master was William James Ethelbert Colgan
Fabian (II) – torpedoed, shelled and sunk on 16 November 1940, having dispersed from Convoy OB.234 on 30 October 1940, some 350 miles SSW of Freetown, in position 02 49N 015 29W, by U-65, having departed Liverpool on 24 October 1940; her Master was Montague Hocking
Palmella (II) – torpedoed and sunk on 01 December 1940, when a straggler due to bad weather from Convoy OG.46, some 225 miles West of Oporto, in position 40 30N 013 30W, by U-37, having departed Oban on 18 November 1940; her Master was Joseph Every
Florian (I) – torpedoed after an 8 hour chase and sunk in 42 seconds on 20 January 1941, some 140 miles WSW of The Faroe Islands, in position 61 14N 012 05W, by U-94, having departed Oban on 18 January 1941; her Master was Laurence Robert Mann

There was 1 Ellerman & Hall Ships (not named “City of”) at the start of World War 2; no Ships were completed during the war and 1 Ellerman & Hall Ship (not named “City of”) was lost.

1 Ellerman & Hall Ship (not named “City of”) did not survive World War 2 as follows:-
Independent Sailings (1)
Kioto (II) – torpedoed East of Torbago, in position 11 05N 060 46W by U-514; torpedoed again, then went ashore at Columbus Point, Tobago, where she was shelled, caught fire and completely burned out; her Master was Arthur Lloyd Beckett

There were 38 Ellerman’s Wilson Ships (not named “City of”) at the start of World War 2; a further 3 Ships (not named “City of”) were completed during the war; a further 1 was purchased and 27 Ellerman’s Wilson Ships (not named “City of”) were lost/sold leaving 15 ships surviving at the end of WW2.
Ellerman’s Wilson at the beginning of WW2:-
Albano (II) 1913
Bassano (III) 1937
Borodino(II) 1911
Carlo (II) 1911
Cavallo (II) 1922
Como 1910
Consuelo (II) 1937
Dago(I) 1902
Domino (III) 1925
Draco (II) 1922
Dynamo (II) 1920
Erato (III) 1923
Forto (Tug) Jan 1939
Gitano (III) 1921
Gourko(I) 1911
Grodno (III) 1919
Guido (II) 1920
Harrogate (II) 1925
Kelso (III) 1924
Kyno (II) 1924
Leo (II) 1920 ex Spes 1908
Mourino(II) 1906
Palermo (II) 1938
Polo (III) 1919
Runo (II) 1920
Salerno (IV) 1924
Salmo (II) 1924
Silvio (II) 1913
Selby 1922 s
Spero (II) 1922
Tasso (IV) 1938
Teano (II) 1925
Thurso (III) 1919 ex War Bramble 1919
Trentino(I) 1919
Truro (II) 1922
Urbino (IV) 1919
Varro (Tug) 1912
Volo (II) 1938

Ellerman’s Wilson ships built during WW2:-
Vasco (III) completed December 1939
Angelo (II) completed April 1940
Ariosto (III) completed March 1940

Ellerman’s Wilson ships purchased during WW2
Kylebrook 1944 ex Homewood 1927 pre Dynamo (III) 1946

Ellerman’s Wilson ships sold to The Admiralty (4)
Mourino(II) 1906 – sold to The Admiralty for use as an ammunition hulk 14 September 1939
Borodino(II) 1911 – sold to The Admiralty 26 September 1939 – sunk 27 May 1940 as a block ship in Zeebrugge
Gourko(I) 1911 - sold to The Admiralty 21 May 1940 – sunk 04 June 1940 as a block ship in Dunkirk
Carlo (II) 1911 ex Las Palmas - sold to The Admiralty 14 September 1939 as an ammunition hulk

15 Ellerman’s Wilson Line (not named “City of”) Ships survived World War 2, namely:-
Angelo (II) 1940
Como 1910
Consuelo (II) 1937
Empire Salerno 1945 ex Markirch 1940 ex Salerno 1924 pre Salerno 1946
Forto (Tug) Jan 1939
Gitano (III) 1921
Grodno (III) 1919
Harrogate (II) 1925
Kylebrook 1944 ex Homewood 1927 pre Dynamo (III) 1946
Palermo (II) 1938
Selby 1922
Spero (II) 1922
Urbino (IV) 1919
Varro (Tug) 1912
Vasco (III) 1939

23 Ellerman Wilson Ships did not survive World War 2 as follows:-
Please note I have not included Salerno (IV) in the below
Lost to collision (1)
Teano (II) – lost on 08 November 1943 after collision with M.V. Chyebassa of British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd., London in position 53 35.58N 000 02.01E in the River Humber while at anchor prior to departure for London with a cargo of lead spelter and empty beer barrels
Fire (1)
Polo (III) – 12 January 1943 arrived at Bougie, West Africa to load lubricating oil in drums and petrol in tins
17 January 1943 whilst waiting to sail an explosion occurred in the vicinity of No. 4 & 5 holds. The subsequent fire spread rapidly forcing the Crew to abandon ship. Shore fire appliances were unable to bring the fire under control, and on the 18th it became necessary to tow the vessel out of port
19 January 1943 the remains of the vessel were sunk by gunfire
Captured & Scuttled (1)
Salmo (II) – 25 June 1940 detained at Port Lyautey, Morocco
03 July 1940 boarded and taken over by 30 armed Vichy French sailors
06 July 1940 the Crew were taken to Casablanca
Shortly afterwards the vessel was renamed St. Emile by the French
July 1941 Compagnie Charles le Borgne (Vichy French) became Managers for the Vichy French Government
08 November 1942 or 16 December 1942 scuttled at Port Lyautey as a blockship
Lost to mine(s) (2)
Albano (II) – 02 March 1940 she was sunk on a mine 128.5 degrees x 7.6 miles from Coquet Light, midway between Blyth and North Sunderland when on passage from Hull to Bergen
She now lies in 22 metres of water in position 55 15 17N 001 22 21W
Dynamo (II) – 17 April 1943 sank after striking a mine 1 mile from B8 Buoy in Barrow Deep, Thames estuary, while on passage from London to Hull with general cargo and stout
The wreck was dispersed by the Admiralty between July and December 1943
Lost to Aircraft (7)
Leo (II) – 25 July 1940 bombed and sunk by German aircraft off Dover while on passage from Seaham Harbour to Portsmouth with a cargo of coal
Silvio (II) – 21 December 1940 sank in South Alexandra Dock Branch, Liverpool after being badly damaged in an air raid; much of her cargo was recovered by divers and the vessel was broken up where she lay; the work not being completed until early in 1947
Draco (II) – 11 April 1941 beached after being damaged during air attack at Tobruk; 21 April 1941 further damaged by air attack and sank and later abandoned as a constructive total loss; February 1948 raised and beached in Tobruk harbour to be made fit for towing; 10 July 1948 loaded with scrap metal; 29 August 1948 sailed for Valencia in tow of the British tug, Merchantman of United Towing Co. Ltd., Hull having been sold to Spanish Shipbreakers; 13 September 1948 arrived at Valencia for demolition
Cavallo (II) – 25 May 1941 sunk by enemy aircraft at Nauplia Bay, Greece whilst on voyage from Piraeus to Nauplia with ammunition, having been bombed on 23rd, 24th & 25th
1952 refloated by an Italian salvage company and towed to Trieste for demolition
Trentino(I) – 08 May 1941 sank in North West Langton Branch Dock, Liverpool after being bombed during a German air raid; she was set on fire by direct hit H.E. bomb and incendiaries; 30 May 1941 refloated and towed to Pluckington Bank, Kings Dock River wall for scrapping
Domino (III) – 03 May 1941 during air raids on Liverpool incendiary bombs set on fire a dock shed in the Canada Dock and the flames set the vessel alight; 04 May 1941 she capsized; 22 September 1941 towed to New Ferry, River Mersey; later declared a constructive total loss and broken up
Dago(1) – 15 March 1942 bombed and sunk by German long-range aircraft in position 39 19N 009 26W off the Portuguese coast while on passage from Lisbon to Oporto with general cargo
Convoys (8)
Kyno (II) – torpedoed and sunk on 28 August 1940, when in Convoy HX.66, some 30 miles NNE of Rockall, in position 58 06N 013 26W, by U-28, having departed Halifax on 16 August 1940; her Master was William Ansdell Thompson
Tasso (IV) – torpedoed and sunk on 02 December 1940, when in Convoy HX.90, some 360 miles West of Bloody Foreland, in position 55 03N 018 04W, by U-52, having departed Halifax on 21 November 1940; her Master was Arnold Herbert
Erato (III) – torpedoed and sunk on 27 July 1941, when in Convoy OG.69, some 200 miles West of Cape Finisterre, in position 43 10N 017 30W, by U-126, having departed Milford Haven on 19 July 1941; her Master was George D. Smail
Ariosto (III) – torpedoed and sunk on 24 October 1941, when the Commodore’s ship in Convoy HG.75, some 300 miles West of Gibraltar in position 36 20N 010 50W, by U-564, having departed Gibraltar on 22 October 1941; her Master was Harold Hill
Volo (II) – torpedoed and sunk on 28 December 1941, when in Convoy ME.8, some 45 miles NW of Mersa Matruh, Egypt, in position 31 45N 026 48E, by U-75, having departed Malta 26 December 1941; her Master was George Ronald Whitfield, MBE
Thurso (III) – torpedoed and sunk on 15 June 1942, when in Convoy HG.84, West of Cape Finisterre, in position 43 41N 018 02W, by U-552, having departed Gibraltar on 10 June 1942; her Master was William Walker; U-552 torpedoed and sank City of Oxford in the same attack
Kelso (III) – torpedoed and sunk on 08 August 1942, when in Convoy SC.94, SE of Cape Farewell, in position 56 30N 032 14W, by U-176, having departed Sydney, CB, on 31 July 1942; her Master was Alfred Hinchcliff
Guido (II) – torpedoed and sunk on 08 March 1943, when a romper from Convoy SC.121, some 450 miles ESE of Cape Farewell, in position 58 08N 032 20W, by U-633, having departed New York City on 23 February 1943; her Master was George Mussared
Independent Sailings (3)
Truro (II) – was stopped and searched by U-36 when some 150 miles East of Kinnaird Head, in position 58 20N 002 00E; the Crew were ordered into the lifeboats and the ship was torpedoed; she was bound Hull and The Tyne to Trondheim with general cargo, coal and coke; her Master was John Charles Egner
Bassano (III) – torpedoed and sunk on 09 January 1941, when NW of Rockall, in position 57 57N 017 42W, by U-105, having departed New York City on 31 December 1940; her Master was Dunsley Harwood Casson
Runo (II) – torpedoed and sunk on 11 April 1943, when some 60 miles NE of Bardia, in position 32 15N 023 55E, by U-593, when bound in ballast from Benghazi to Alexandria; her Master was CH Tully

In World War 2 there were 43 ships managed by Ellermans (not including Ellerman’s Wilson Line) for the MOWT (Misc.).
There were 0 Ellerman (Misc.) ships at the start of World War 2; 42 ships were completed/taken over during the war and 2 ships were lost.

41 survived World War 2, namely:-
Andrea Gritti 1943; Hall Line as Managers; 1945 returned to Sidarma of Venice
Ben H. Miller 1943; E&P as Managers; 1947 acquired by Ellermans (E&B) and renamed City of Shrewsbury
Cape Douglas 1944; bare boat charter to MOWT with E & B as Managers
Cap Tourane 1923 ex Jouffroy D’Abbans; 1940 to 1945 served with The Free French with Ellermans as Managers; 1946 returned to Chargeurs Reunis
Empire Clyde (1) 1943 ex Leonardo Da Vinci 1925; 11 February 1941 captured at Kismayu with City Line as Managers when renamed; 01 January 1948 taken over by The Admiralty
Empire Comfort 1944 with City Line as Managers
Empire Faith 1941; managed by Westcott & Laurence
Empire Gauntlet 1944; launched as Cape Comorin and completed as Empire Gauntlet; converted to an LSI and renamed HMS SEFTON and present at Normandy; reverted to supply ship EMPIRE GAUNTLET with City Line as Managers
Empire Irving 1944 with Hall Line as Managers; 1946 purchased by Ropner Shipping Co. & renamed BELLERBY
Empire Lifeguard 1944 with City Line as Managers
Empire Ock 1939 ex DOGU, ex LUDERITZBUCHT 1940; ex DUALA 1945; renamed EMPIRE OCK in 1945 with City Line as Managers; 1946 sold to the Russians and renamed PEOTR VELIKI
Empire Peacemaker 1944 with City Line as Managers
Empire Pendennis 1944 with Hall Line as Managers; April 1946 acquired by Cunard-White Star Line Ltd and renamed VASCONIA
Empire Rest 1944 with City Line as Managers
Empire Shelter 1945 with City Line as Managers
Empire Spartan 1942 with Clark & Service, Glasgow as Managers; 1947 Managers became E&B; 1951 acquired by Ellermans (E&B) and renamed City of Cardiff
Empire Viceroy 1943 with Hall Line as Managers; 1947 transferred to Counties Ship Management
Empire Wallace 1946 with Hall Line as Managers; 1947 the Managers became Haddon SS Co, London
Frederick Banting 1943 with City Line as Managers; April 1947 sold to Ellermans; 11 June 1947 renamed City of St. Albans
Fort Constantine 1944 with Ellerman and Bucknall as Managers; 1949 transferred to The Admiralty
Fort Dunvegan 1944 with Ellerman and Bucknall as Managers; 1949 transferred to The Admiralty
Fort Edmonton 1944 with Ellerman and Bucknall as Managers; 1947 transferred to Federal & Commercial Nav Co, Montreal and renamed FEDERAL VOYAGER
Fort Kilmar 1944 with Ellerman and Bucknall as Managers; 1947 sold and renamed IRONSIDE
Fort Providence 1944 with Ellerman and Bucknall as Managers; 1948 owners were Easboard Navigation Co, Montreal and renamed EASTWATER
Fort Rosalie 1945 with Ellermans as Managers; 1947 transferred to The Admiralty
Fort Sandusky 1945 with Ellermans as Managers; 1947 transferred to The Admiralty
Fort Tadoussac 1942 with Ellerman and Bucknall as Managers; 1947 Owners became USMC
Fort Wayne 1945 with Ellermans as Managers; 1948 transferred to MOT
Kaolack 1917
Marine Raven 1944; Lloyds says in 1945 she was managed by Ellermans
Samarina 1943 bare boat charter with Westcott & Laurence as Managers; 1947 purchased by Ellermans (E&B) and renamed City of Ely
Samboston 1943 bare boat charter with E&P as Managers; January 1947 Managers became E&B; June 1947 purchased by Ellermans and renamed City of Rochester
Sambrake 1943 bare boat charter with E&B as Managers; 1947 purchased by Ellermans (E&B) and renamed City of Chelmsford in June 1947
Samcrest 1944 bare boat charter with E&B as Managers; May 1947 purchased by Ellermans and renamed City of Leeds
Samhain 1943 bare boat charter with E&B as Managers; October 1947 purchased by Ellermans and renamed City of Portsmouth
Samlea 1944 bare boat charter with E&B as Managers; August 1947 purchased by Ellermans and renamed City of Colchester
Samois 1943 bare boat charter with E&P as Managers; August 1947 purchased by Ellermans and renamed City of Lichfield
Samshire 1943 bare boat charter with E&B as Managers; September 1947 purchased by Ellermans and renamed City of Doncaster
Samtorch 1944 bare boat charter with E&B as Managers; 1947 purchased by Ellermans for 16,000 UK Pounds and renamed City of Stafford
Samtweed 1943 bare boat charter with Hall Line as Managers; October 1947 purchased by Ellermans and renamed City of Newport
Taiposhan 1901 ex Hang Sang; 1940 managed by Ellerman and Papayanni and renamed TAIPOSHAN

2 Ellerman (Misc.) ships did not survive World War 2 as follows:-
Convoys (1)
Cap Padaran – torpedoed and damaged on 09 December 1943, when in Convoy HA.11, NE of Cape Spartivento, Italy, in position 39 15N 017 30E; she was taken in tow, but the line parted and she sank after her back broke; she had departed Taranto on 08 December 1943 for Augusta; her Master was Edward Garner
Independent Sailings (1)
D’Entrecasteaux – torpedoed and sunk on 08 November 1942, some 150 miles East of Barbados, in position 15 30N 057 00W, by U-154; she had departed Pernambuco on 30 October 1942; her Master was William Jones

In World War 2 there were a total of 39 ships managed by Ellerman’s Wilson Line (Misc.) - not including Ellermans mentioned above) for the MOWT.
There were 0 Ellerman’s Wilson Line (Misc.) ships at the start of World War 2; 39 ships came under their management during the war and 9 ships were lost.

30 EWL (Misc.) ships survived World War 2, namely:-
Darien II 1892; 24 June 1941 Owners convicted of offences against immigration laws at Haifa and vessel forfeited to Palestinian Government; 14 September 1941 Requisitioned for British Government use; February 1945 Requisitioned by MOWT with EWL as Managers; December 1950 Laid up at Port Said
Empire Consistence ex Ganter 1927; 1945 renamed and managed by EWL; 1949 managed by Glen & Co, Glasgow
Empire Convention ex Heidberg1943; 1945 renamed and managed by EWL; 1946 sold to the Russians and renamed ERNST THAELMANN
Empire Factor 1944; managed by EWL; 1946 renamed COE JEAN by Coe Line Ltd, London
Empire Gabon 1945 ex Licentia 1944; 1945 renamed and managed by EWL; 1946 sold to the Russians and renamed RIAZAN
Empire Gage 1945 ex Santander 1943; 1945 renamed and managed by EWL; 1946 charted by the Netherlands Governtment and renamed ARNHEM
Empire Haig 1944 with EWL as Managers; 1946 renamed DRYDEN by Lamport & Holt, Liverpool
Empire Paragon 1944 with EWL as Managers; 1946 renamed PINJARRA by P&O
Empire Salerno ex Markirch 1940 ex Salerno 1920; 1945 renamed with EWL as Managers; 1946 renamed SALERNO with EWL as Owners
Empire Sara 1943 with EWL as Managers; 1946 renamed PRESTO with EWL as Owners
Empire Wansbeck ex LINZ 1943; 1945 renamed with EWL as Managers; 1962 renamed ESPEROS for Kavounides Brothers, Piraeus
Fort St. James 1942; managed by Ellerman & Bucknalls then EWL; sold to Lambert Brothers Ltd, London and renamed TEMPLE BAR
Frigga 1922; 21 May 1940 requisitioned with EWL as Managers; 28 June 1945 returned to Det Forenede Dampskibs Selskab, Copenhagen
Gay Corsair 1943; returned to the RN and became MGB 507 in 1944 and MGB 2007 in 1945; stranded and foundered off Aberdeen on 24 May 1945
Hebe 1912; 09 May 1940 requisitioned with EWL as Managers; 01 June 1940 chartered by the French Government and renamed HEBE II; 16 June 1940 requisitioned by the French Government and renamed SAINTE SYLVIA; 22 September 1940 laid up at Port Lyautey; 10 November 1942 sunk there by the Vichy French; 29 November 1942 raised by the RN and returned to MOWT with EWL as Managers and renamed HEBE II; January 1943 chartered to US Army; 31 December 1945 returned to Det Forenede Dampskibs Selskab, Copenhagen
Hindsholm 1922; 13 May 1940 requisitioned with EWL as Managers; 17 December 1945 returned to Det Forenede Dampskibs Selskab, Copenhagen
Hopewell 1943; returned to the RN and became MGB 504 in 1944 and MGB 2004 in 1945
Lech 1934; 07 August 1940 time chartered with EWL as Managers; 19 February 1946 returned to Poland and taken over by the Polish Government
Lublin 1932; 09 August 1940 time chartered with EWL as Managers; 01 April 1946 returned to Poland and taken over by the Polish Government
Nonsuch 1943; returned to the RN and became MGB 505 in 1944 and MGB 2005 in 1945
Rota 1923; 05 May 1940 requisitioned with EWL as Managers; 28 June 1945 returned to Det Forenede Dampskibs Selskab, Copenhagen
Samark 1943; bare boat charter with EWL as Managers; September 1947 returned to USMC
Sambur 1943; bare boat charter with EWL as Managers; 1944 renamed Samwharfe; October 1947 returned to USMC
Samlouis 1943; bare boat charter with EWL as Managers; 21 April 1947 sold to Alva SS Co Ltd and renamed CORALSTONE
Samore 1943; bare boat charter with EWL as Managers; renamed Samdel (date unknown); 18 August 1944 severely damaged by a flying bomb whilst in West India Dock, London; October 1947 returned to USMC
Samsmola 1944; bare boat charter with EWL as Managers; December 1947 returned to USMC
Skjold 1904; 31 May 1940 requisitioned with EWL as Managers; 11 September 1945 returned to Det Forenede Dampskibs Selskab, Copenhagen
Svanholm 1922; 18 May 1940 requisitioned with EWL as Managers; 28 September 1945 returned to Det Forenede Dampskibs Selskab, Copenhagen
Thyra II 1923 ex THYRA; 17 May 1940 requisitioned with EWL as Managers; 11 October 1940 mined and damaged off the East Barrow Light Vessel; taken in tow by the tugs CRESTED COCK, RACIA, SUN III and KING LEAR; repaired and re-entered service; 28 June 1945 returned to Det Forenede Dampskibs Selskab, Copenhagen
Tyr 1890; 05 May 1940 with EWL as Managers; 28 June 1945 returned to Det Forenede Dampskibs Selskab, Copenhagen

9 EWL (Misc.) ships did not survive World War 2 as follows:-
Wrecked / Stranded (1)
Ebro 1920; 05 May 1940 requisitioned with Yeoward Line Ltd, Liverpool originally as Managers; later that year EWL became Managers; 18 March 1942 ran aground 2 miles north of Rattray Head, Aberdeen while on passage from Reykjavik to Hull with a cargo of fish and became a total loss
Collision (1)
Gay Viking 1943; lost 05 February 1945 in Operation MOONSHINE when in collision with HOPEWELL; later raised and refitted and in 1970 known to be in existence as a pleasure craft, named Bahamas Viking, in The Bahamas; believed to have been broken up in the 90’s
Aircraft (4)
Bellona II 1924; 13 May 1940 requisitioned with EWL as Managers; 08 October 1940 whilst on a voyage from Hull to Reykjavik with a cargo of 300 tons of ice to collect fish and 4 miles East of Gourdon she was bombed, drifted aground in Strathalethan Bay and was declared a total constructive loss
Celte 1893; 31 October 1940 intercepted by The Northern Patrol; 06 February 1941 taken over with EWL as Managers; 27 April 1941 bombed by German aircraft in position 61 20N 011 00W while on passage from Reykjavik to Hull with a cargo of fish; later the same day abandoned by Crew without loss and sank in position 61 01N 010 44W
Diana 1911 – 09 June 1941 bombed and sunk by German aircraft in position 62 04N 013 40W, while on passage from Reykjavik to Hull with a cargo of fish
Lwow 1932; 08 August 1940 time chartered with EWL as Managers; lost during the air attack on Bari on 02 December 43
Submarine (2)
Egholm 1924 – torpedoed and sunk on 25 February 1945, when in Convoy FS.1739, SE of Holy Island, in position 55 50N 001 32W, by U-2322 having sailed from Methil bound for London; her Master was KS Kristensen
Flora II 1909 ex Flora; 17 May 1940 requisitioned by Ministry of Shipping with EWL as Managers and renamed FLORA II; torpedoed and sunk within 6 minutes on 02 August 1942 when 60 miles SE of Vestmannaeyar, Iceland, in position 62 45N 019 07W having departed Reykjavik that day bound for Scrabster and Hull; her Master was Peter Kristjan Johanes Nielsen
Captured (1)
Master Standfast – captured by the Germans on 02 November 1943 when in Operation BRIDPORT

Commencement of WW2
Ellerman “City” Ships – 79
E&P – 24
Hall – 1
Ellerman’s Wilson – 38
Ellerman (Misc.) – 0
Ellerman’s Wilson (Misc.) – 0

Sold in WW2
Ellerman “City” Ships – 0
E&P – 1
Hall – 0
Ellerman’s Wilson – 4

Purchased in WW2
Ellerman “City” Ships – 0
E&P – 0
Hall – 0
Ellerman’s Wilson – 1

Built in WW2
Ellerman “City” Ships – 5
E&P – 1
Hall – 0
Ellerman’s Wilson – 3

Acquired (Management) in WW2
Ellerman (Misc.) – 43
Ellerman’s Wilson (Misc.) - 39

Losses in WW2
Ellerman “City” Ships - 40
E&P – 20
Hall – 1
Wilson – 23
Ellerman (Misc.) – 2
Ellerman’s Wilson (Misc.) - 9
Ellerman Fleet Losses in WW2 – 95

End of WW2
Ellerman “City” Ships – 44
E&P – 4
Hall – 0
Ellerman’s Wilson – 15
Ellerman (Misc.) – 41
Ellerman’s Wilson (Misc.) – 30

Any additions truly welcomed

Cheers
Mike
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  #2  
Old 8th October 2016, 11:10
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Ron Stringer Ron Stringer is offline
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What a labour of love! Fantastic work, Mike. Thank you for that.
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Old 8th October 2016, 21:20
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Hugh MacLean Hugh MacLean is online now
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A great effort Mike well done.

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Old 8th October 2016, 22:18
John Dryden John Dryden is offline  
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Thanks for that.
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Old 8th October 2016, 22:22
Ivor Lloyd Ivor Lloyd is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh MacLean View Post
A great effort Mike well done.

Regards
Hugh
Thank you for this excellent record of Ellerman ships.
I was Radio Officer on the City of Lille in 1942
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Old 8th October 2016, 23:52
Somerton Somerton is offline  
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Mike , that was some task . A very comprehensive article about Ellerman,s . It brought back memories of those ships . Many of which I remember seeing . Both in the UK and overseas . Many thanks .
Alex C .
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Old 9th October 2016, 13:15
Michael Taylor Michael Taylor is offline  
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First trip Apprentice '59 on the Ellerman Hall Line...City of Madras. Many years later saw her in Khoashung (spelling) ready for the breakers yard. When I joined she still had the war time radar shack on the monkey Island. two base mountings on top of the covered wing ends and the mountings for a forecastle gun, if you looked hard enough.
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