Idling diesel engines? - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
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Idling diesel engines?

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  #26  
Old 30th September 2017, 15:16
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ART6 ART6 is offline   SN Supporter
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A friend of mine bought a motor cruiser with twin diesels from a broker on the Thames, where it had spent its lift to then. He wanted to use it for sea cruising from Newhaven, and I was pressed as chief engineer for the voyage from the Thames.

There were strict speed limits on the Thames, so its engines had never been run at anything near full power, so upon reaching open water the first job was to start coaxing the engines up to full power, a little at a time. That created a lot of smoke so the trick was to let it clear then inch the throttles up a bit more, and keep doing that until at last there was no smoke and full power was achieved. It ran as sweet as a nut for years afterwards!
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  #27  
Old 30th September 2017, 15:44
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Satanic Mechanic Satanic Mechanic is online now  
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Anything below 50% load is progressively worse for them. Turbos really suffer if they are fitted
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  #28  
Old 30th September 2017, 23:03
george e mitchell george e mitchell is offline  
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Reading posts mentioned Scavenge fires, in 1962 I joined the Waiwera a shaw Savill ship built 1944, Its two main engines double acting two stroke B &W six cyl ie 18 pistons per engine, for the two years I spent on her as junior engineer on Transit to N,Z and AUSSIE we would have A SCAVENGE FIRE. every couple of days some were worse than others. Many times there would be more smoke coming out of the skylights than the funnel. the alarm would sound and all off duty engineers would go to the engine room.On the way down the ladders You couldn't see the engine tops. Once you got past that it wasn't to bad,
Every body knew what they had to do. the engine was pulled back tp minimum speed but essential not to stop other wise seizure could occur Increase lubrication oil to cyls via the lubricators,on the worst fires the trunking would be glowing red, when it was out we went round the scavenge drains to blow out a bucket full of piston rings. We would pick up speed till the next time, THEcriteria was when the cooling oil out from the main piston reached 180 deg fah we would have to stop and re ring the pistons quite a job on a double acting cyl containing three pistons specially in the tropics, I never did one voyage without having to do this many times. six on six off for days One one occasion we were watching a movie on a screen we had spread between the Samson posts just aft of the accommodation The alarm went ,we all went down the engine room, when we came back the large screen was no more, the hot embers from the funnel had set fire to it, It was dumped over the side, ON that occasion we had animals on the aft deck as well. Incredible the name of the movie was TOWERING INFERNO,
When I left the Waiwera I never saw a scavenge fire again, for seven years Being my first big ship I thought all ships were the same, at that time I was young and found that ship exciting, never knew what was going to happen next, runaway generators, saying hello to a piston as it flew by.

.Getting back to the original topic when I left the merchant navy I started in the oil industry in Uk. in the 1970s most supply boats were AMERICAN and
had EMD two stroke engines, Part of the task was standby a rig for a month at a time, just above idle. if we did not give full power at least twice a day we would end up with a severe fire when we did,I then changed to oil rigs as chief eng.where the diesels were on full power continuous When on tow, The problem
then occurred that when under full power any crankcase fumes from the valve guides would accumulate on the fuel valve racks When the power was reduced because the fuel valve racks had seized with varnish the engines could only be Stopped using the overspeed devices, On occassion a hair raising experience
When you are under assisted tow, When you spend 15 years on the same rig you get to know these things and make sure they don't happen,

.So running at idle and running at full power have there own problems

Regards to all George

Last edited by george e mitchell; 30th September 2017 at 23:26..
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  #29  
Old 1st October 2017, 10:55
Engine Serang Engine Serang is offline  
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Why the hell do you need an engine in a yacht? Do you not have a sail, or suite of sails,as us yachties say.
Ask yourself and perhaps your "Skipper" if Nelson had a Donk on the Victory or if Francis Drake missed having one whilst tangling with the Spanish.
Are we still a seafaring nation?
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  #30  
Old 1st October 2017, 12:19
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The 1GM10 is a cracking little engine. On several occasions I have been called to a 1GM10 that overheated due to operator error (ENAF = Equipment Not At Fault) and the engines seized. Owners dismay turns to joy after their little gems cool down and I fix the cooling system problem (often opening the cooling water sea-cock), then restart, they are pretty robust.
My brother had one in Bergen which he (a marine engineer of many years experience) overheated and seized. He removed the engine from the boat and took it to the local Yanmar agent who put it on the test rig and started it immediately. If only he had called his little brother but then again, what would he know?
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  #31  
Old 1st October 2017, 12:46
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Varley Varley is offline   SN Supporter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Engine Serang View Post
Why the hell do you need an engine in a yacht? Do you not have a sail, or suite of sails,as us yachties say.
Ask yourself and perhaps your "Skipper" if Nelson had a Donk on the Victory or if Francis Drake missed having one whilst tangling with the Spanish.
Are we still a seafaring nation?
If the wind is not blowing hard enough it is difficult for them to get enough in the way of proper ships to perform their intended duty of navigational hazard. In those circumstance an engine is required.
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