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What goes on in the Galley.

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  #26  
Old 6th April 2009, 00:01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David W View Post
Who called that nurse a nugget, who called that nugget a nurse, well something like that.

I never sailed in liners so I didnt know that nurses carried out galley inspections, so I have 2 queries,
a. Was this usual in all big ship company's, or just P&O.
b. I am sure that the big ship galleys worked more or less 24 hours a day, did that mean the nursing staff working a 3 watch system.

With regard to cargo ships, a good galley staff usually produced good food, within the constraints of the company provided stores, and it was usually appreciated by most of the crew. There were, of course, one or two dissenting voices, these were quite often owned by people whose espicurean expertise, and discerning palate, had been honed to perfection, in such notable eateries as dock yard canteens, chip shops and Stan Waters. But, never the less, when such less than complimentary remarks reached the ears of the galley brigade they took it to heart, and usually turned to and by combining their multi talents produced something really special for consumption by those Egons Ronays of the seven seas. Quite often the recipient of such special diets recognised the thought that had gone into their treat and rapidly joined the rest of the crew in appreciating the efforts of the galley staff.

By the way, does anyone remember Goddards Plate Powder. ?

a. I am not sure if other companies, but we certainly did on P&O.

b. We all took our turns. The medical department worked as a team, just as shore. I was in the galley the most, especially on Arcadia often getting my own grub and taking it back to my cabin, but also my patients if the passenger hospital steward was too busy. I Canberra, I had my own steward, but shared one on Arcadia. That was in addition to my Peak Boy and Laundry Steward, the same as Canberra.

We wandered in the Galley at any time especially after a bout of food poisoning which was just as often then, as today, if not more so. We were on call 24 hours a day, all of us. The Surgeon and Baby Doc took turns at night etc, but the rest of us were always on call.

David
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  #27  
Old 6th April 2009, 13:18
David W David W is offline  
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Thanks for the reply David, the world of the big ships was, and thankfully remained, a complete mystery to me, but it is nice to know how, some, of the other half lived.

With regard to food poisoning, I reckon that is another big ships "thing", as I have never heard of mass illness breaking out amongst the crews of cargo ships or tankers, although I have no doubt I will be rapidly informed if it has happened.
PS; I dont count the occasional, self inflicted, bouts of delhi belly, brought about by over indulgence in Guinness and curry.

Last edited by David W; 7th April 2009 at 10:38.. Reason: misplaced comma
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  #28  
Old 7th April 2009, 02:10
Old Janner Old Janner is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David W View Post
Thanks for the reply David, the world of the big ships was, and thankfully remained, a complete mystery to me, but it is nice to know how, some, of the other half lived.

With regard to food poisoning, I reckon that is another big ships "thing", as I have never heard of mass illness breaking out amongst the crews of cargo ships or tankers, although I have no doubt I will be rapidly informed if it has happened.
PS; I dont count the occasional, self inflicted bouts, of delhi belly, brought about by over indulgence in Guinness and curry.
Yes David I remeber Goddards Plate powder, we used to use it every saturday night to clean up the EPNS silver ware ready for inspection, or if there was no Plate powder, we used a couple of Aluminium plate stacking rings with boiling water and soda, also used to take the tarnish off.
Right enough in all the years I have been involved with the Galley, have never seen a outbreak of food poisioning, only upset stomachs brought on by over indulging with beer and a curry from shore side.

Spence.
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  #29  
Old 9th April 2009, 20:44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by E.Martin View Post
I did see a captains tiger flange the rim of the captains coffee cup prior to pouring the coffee mumbling, I'll teach that bastard for getting on to me.
Used to frequently put plates under the salamander for people who got on my ****. Then would instruct the saloon steward to leave the plate half hanging off the edge of the table when he served it, meaning the halfwit who upset me would invariably singe his fingers pushing it on.

Had a second mate once bit of a pompous git who would'nt make do with a nice bacon and egg toastie on the poop deck like the rest of the lads when tying up in Montreal, he insisted on a poached egg sarnie, after breakfast had been wiped down. So put the egg in the pan for all of ooh ten seconds, put the barely cooked egg on a slice of toast and balanced another slice on top. When he squashed it down , squish it went all over his nice new boiler suit. Petty? maybes, but it was bloody funny.

Think it was said earlier 'Don't f**k with cookie'
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  #30  
Old 11th April 2009, 14:07
stequantum stequantum is offline  
 
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I was a gally boy on a small ship going to canada name escapes me any way one day went to wake up the cook he was out of it, not wanting to drop him in the proverbial decided to cook breakfast, somehow got away with that lunch came around still no cook menu said roast or boiled chicken so i put the chicken in the steamer for a bit then stuck it in the oven to roast captain was not amused. Nieter was cookie when he woke up
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  #31  
Old 11th April 2009, 14:46
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Rumour had it that all meat was cooked like that on Australian ships, Steq. The theory was that nothing burned in the steamer and it could be left there overnight and finished off in the deep fryer to give a "roasted" appearance.

This practice was supposed to stop when it was realised that the steamers received their heat from poisonous funnel gas or something like that.

The above story is all hearsay as I never worked in the galley, but the meat often lost its rubberiness when the steamer conked out, and repairs were often put on the back burner - is that a Freudian slip?

I'm open to contradiction from any Aussie ships' cooks.

John T.
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  #32  
Old 12th April 2009, 11:14
stequantum stequantum is offline  
 
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Hi John,

Sorry maybe i did not put it right. On the menu there was supposed to be 2 options, steamed or roast chicken in my innocence i did not understand and steamed then roasted them, so if someone asked for steamed or roast they got the same chicken.

Steq
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  #33  
Old 12th April 2009, 21:20
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Thanks Steq, I did get that. Actually the cook had a bit of a cheek if he got up you, you were only trying to cover for him.

The practice I was referring to was a short cut with which Jamie Oliver would be most impressed - maybe.

John T.
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  #34  
Old 13th April 2009, 10:02
stequantum stequantum is offline  
 
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Hi John,

Thanks for that. Met some good cooks who worked hard to make sure every one was happy, so one thing you dont do with a man who has worked hard in sweltering heat is upset him, BECAUSE IF YOU DID i would not like to say what i saw them do !ooh
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  #35  
Old 16th April 2009, 10:04
mcgurggle mcgurggle is offline
 
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I was Cook/Steward on the 'Alfred Everard' up in Gothenborg. It was mid winter & as no-one had any 'dhobi dust' aboard and it was too cold to go ashore for some, I decided to make my own! I grated a bar of that old 'carbolic' soap which was a yellow colour. The dhobi room was just off the mess room, (we had an old 'wishy washy, paddle action Hotpoint washing machine) so I headed for it. As I passed through the mess room with the grated soap on a plate , a greedy AB shouted 'Oh look! CHEESE ! He had a handfull down his throat and was going for a second one when he realised his mistake.
He never got off the 'pan' for 2 days & his stomach cramps were terrible.
Moral ?? 'Always ASK the Cook before helping yourself ' !
Serves the ba***rd right LOL
McG
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  #36  
Old 16th April 2009, 23:00
benjidog benjidog is offline
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I can believe this McG. A traditional home remedy for constipation was a D.I.Y suppository made of a small piece of hard green soap. Certainly gave you a run for your money!
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  #37  
Old 16th April 2009, 23:18
surfaceblow surfaceblow is offline  
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One ship I was on the cook would use the steam table to cook the canned vegetables. At the evening meal I asked the Steward if the steam table was broken since the vegetables were cold. The Stewards reply was no the steam table was working fine the cook didn't empty the tins into the steam table trays before getting stewed.
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  #38  
Old 17th April 2009, 12:04
Old Janner Old Janner is offline  
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Cooks stewed / Pissed !! They certainly gave me a lot of experience the hard way. As Galley Boy I covered for the cook and 2nd cook when they were in bed or ashore while in Port.
When 2nd cook I covered for the Ch cook when he was unable to turn to in port and some times at sea, When I became ch / Stwd was still having to fill in for the Ch cook when he was astray or pissed.
I like a good drink but have always been able to do my job, no matter how bad I felt.
Different story, while working bye BP ships in dry dock on the Tyne (Wallsend Slipway) we were always strapped for cash, so on darts nights, 2nd stwd and myself used to make up a big tray of sarnies on board and take them up to the pub, and drink all night without paying. Went home with the barmaid one night forgot to give the galley keys to the 2nd steward, as I was anticipating a long lie in the morning, came out of her house ran down to the pub, came back and could'nt find the house, all the doors looked the same and about 20 doors in the street to embarrasing to knock on them all. Back to the ship no Nookie!!
Spence.
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  #39  
Old 18th April 2009, 13:59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Janner View Post
Cooks stewed / Pissed !! They certainly gave me a lot of experience the hard way. As Galley Boy I covered for the cook and 2nd cook when they were in bed or ashore while in Port.
When 2nd cook I covered for the Ch cook when he was unable to turn to in port and some times at sea, When I became ch / Stwd was still having to fill in for the Ch cook when he was astray or pissed.
I like a good drink but have always been able to do my job, no matter how bad I felt.
Different story, while working bye BP ships in dry dock on the Tyne (Wallsend Slipway) we were always strapped for cash, so on darts nights, 2nd stwd and myself used to make up a big tray of sarnies on board and take them up to the pub, and drink all night without paying. Went home with the barmaid one night forgot to give the galley keys to the 2nd steward, as I was anticipating a long lie in the morning, came out of her house ran down to the pub, came back and could'nt find the house, all the doors looked the same and about 20 doors in the street to embarrasing to knock on them all. Back to the ship no Nookie!!
Spence.
I can relate to this Old Janner,
First trip away galley boy the cook was a proper piss head, I was constantly covering for him and others as I progressed. I vowed I would never ever fall through with the drink. And never did in twelve years at sea. Went ashore in Gibraltar once when I was 2nd cook didn't come back on board till 5am. I was still in the galley at 5.30, albeit standing with my head propped leaning against the top of the Hobart as the dough went round, fast asleep. Chief cook coud'nt believe it.
Those were the days of liveners at smokoe to pull you round. Aah would'nt happen now would it? LOL
JACKO
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  #40  
Old 26th April 2009, 20:41
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Ray Mac Ray Mac is offline  
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Im not sure I want to know the answer to this
No Worry Steve
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  #41  
Old 16th July 2009, 20:00
gorach gorach is offline  
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once had a right snooty punter on a research boat, every day one of the galley crew rimmed his cup ,he was giving us blow job by proxy, when he was drinking his coffee,made us feel better
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  #42  
Old 21st July 2009, 14:49
ALAN TYLER ALAN TYLER is offline  
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Originally Posted by Ian Haldane View Post
Cannot tell a lie - 2/E and I used to have an end of watch rum (or two) and stagger into breakfast - sorry
I guess it was thoughtless rudeness rather than intentional arrogance.
Apology accepted, times a great healer. Airline pilot, wonder if any food tampering goes on up in the sky?
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  #43  
Old 21st July 2009, 15:47
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Was anyone ever a ships cook on the passenger boats?
As I recall the Andes and the Capetown Castle had Crews Galleys. On one of them at least, it was under the Focstle. One was open onto the well deck. Pretty exposed when collecting the grub for the mess. Pretty chilly for the cooks, hot on one side, and cold due the exposed position of the galley, on the other. Don't remember the food being too bad though. But compared with what the passengers were getting............
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  #44  
Old 21st July 2009, 17:35
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Originally Posted by joebuckham View Post
i can't see much point in all this revenge, by the addition of various body fluids to the meals and serving straight from the gash bucket, if the victims did'nt know they had been paid back.
Revenge is a Dish Best Served Cold


Old Klingon proverb by Khaless the unforgettable.
(and various others)
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  #45  
Old 21st July 2009, 19:13
Steve Woodward Steve Woodward is offline  
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Originally Posted by Burned Toast View Post
No Worry Steve
Once we lost most of the catering staff and the old man had to balance the books he found out what the problems were in trying to balance the budget and meet the feeding rate
But what was it like in the '70's when we actually had a catering department as against a cook and a messman, were things as tight ?
Steve
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  #46  
Old 21st July 2009, 19:51
Bill Davies Bill Davies is offline  
 
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Only ever recall this type of 'carry on' once and that was on one of the NBC 'Ore' Class (Puerto Ordaz -Baton Rouge). Full Cayman crew (Crew List read as a British ship). Cook had a difference with one of the crowd who was eventually hospitalized due some unspeakable illness. I called the police in whilst in BR. Cook arrested, jailed (two years) and worse than that he was struck off the NBC pool. Never worked again, and rightly so.
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  #47  
Old 22nd July 2009, 23:28
johnb42 johnb42 is offline  
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Can't personally vouch for this one, but a bosun I sailed with swears it is true.

Cook on a supertanker, Gulf to Bantry Bay run. Not much of a cook, pretty poor in fact, but high on hygeine and likes to live in a clean cabin. Each night after work, leaves his galley shoes on the mat outside his cabin and slips on a pair of flip-flops for indoors.
One of the crew, who is more into food than hygeine has a couple of beers one night and decides to leave a turd in one of the cooks boots.
The next morning he checks out the galley once or twice, only to find the cook going about his business with a smile on his face. He does the same in the afternoon and again for the next two days - no change whatsoever in the cooks demeanour.
It plays on his mind continuously but he keeps quiet right up until they are al paying off in Bantry Bay. By now he knows he can't leave the ship without a response.
As they walk away from the pay-off table, he turns to the cook and asks him outright. "Hey, cookie, did you ever find out who left the turd in your galley boots"?
No. says the cook. . . . . .























But I know who ate it.

I'll get me coat.
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  #48  
Old 22nd July 2009, 23:42
Jim Brady Jim Brady is offline  
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Ships Food.

Somebody mentioned Plate Powder.I was sitting in my cabin one night having a beer(Iron Ore boat Oregis)2nd Stwd appeared with a plate of sandwiches here you are "scouse" I made to many for the skipper.A nice plate of salmon sarnies garnished with lettuce and tomato.I could'nt understand the fuss, him and I just did'nt get on.The next day was I ill!!! I had to carry on working of course but the captain did'nt come out of his cabin for about three days.
I then realised if you want to poison someone with plate powder the best thing to do it with is tinned salmon.For those of you that have used plate powder you will know it turns reddy/pink when wet.Mixed with salmon it just blends in and its such a fine abrassive that you would'nt notice it.
The next time I came across this guy I joined the BP Distributer in Preston,as I approached the gangway he was standing at the top in cooks gear!!!I certainly watched what I ate on her.
Regards.
Jim Brady.
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  #49  
Old 23rd July 2009, 09:03
tsell tsell is offline
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Originally Posted by mcgurggle View Post
I was Cook/Steward on the 'Alfred Everard' up in Gothenborg. It was mid winter & as no-one had any 'dhobi dust' aboard and it was too cold to go ashore for some, I decided to make my own! I grated a bar of that old 'carbolic' soap which was a yellow colour. The dhobi room was just off the mess room, (we had an old 'wishy washy, paddle action Hotpoint washing machine) so I headed for it. As I passed through the mess room with the grated soap on a plate , a greedy AB shouted 'Oh look! CHEESE ! He had a handfull down his throat and was going for a second one when he realised his mistake.
He never got off the 'pan' for 2 days & his stomach cramps were terrible.
Moral ?? 'Always ASK the Cook before helping yourself ' !
Serves the ba***rd right LOL
McG
AH YES! The old 'Carbolic Soap' trick!

Sailed with a 3rd mate on his first trip as such. He was a six foot redhead. After a week or so he started to throw his weight around, with the deck crew at first, then the catering boys. He became a fair dinkum b*stard!
What to do about him?
Over a few beers we discussed this growing problem amongst what was otherwise a great crew.
The cook was an easy going Cornishman who, as with the rest of us, was heartily sick of his carryings on.
'Doc' was renowned for his curries and Macaroni Cheese, the latter being a favourite of the 3rd. So a plan was hatched!
For the next few weeks he took a potato peeler to a bar of Carbolic and with just a couple of shavings at first, added them to the Macaroni on the 3rd's plate. He always liked extra cheese with the plate two minutes under the grill.
The 'dose' was gradually increased - not enough to be noticed by the recipient - but the effect was marvelous!
While it did not completely cure him of his arrogance, the time he spent on the bog certainly subdued him to a great extent.
The 'medicine' did not appear to have any lasting effect although we heard that the Mate was not too happy with his performance!!

I always helped to peel spuds as you really had be friendly with the cooks for obvious reasons!

Taffy R556959
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  #50  
Old 23rd July 2009, 12:55
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JamesM JamesM is offline  
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Similar story about Catering Staff, but not involving food, thank goodness.
One day,whilst serving on British Severn, the Cat/Off asks me if the Engineers have much crockery/cutlery in the control room that has'nt been returned after they've had a meal.His reason for asking is that he's running very low on said items and he can't find out where they've gone. I tell him I don't think so, but I'll check. That afternoon I mention the topic to the 3/E only to be told that he think he has the answer. Apparently a couple of mornings ago after coming off the 12-4 he was making a cup of coffee in the pantry when the 2nd Stwd came in, took one look at the sink which had a pile of used crockery/cutlery soaking in soapy water, pulled out the plug, got a tray and lifted the contents of the sink onto it, stepped out onto the deck and chucked the lot over the wall, muttering " If they think I'm going to wash that lot they can get stuffed".(When interviewed later he admitted to doing this on a regular basis.)
So there you have it, the mystery of the vanishing crockery has been solved ---- it's all in Davy Jones' Locker!!(or on his table more like)
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