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  #101  
Old 8th December 2012, 00:25
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I have been searching for information about a book called "The Voyage of the Navidad" or some such thing, I think this was by Joshua Slocum and was often in the first part of his "Sailing Alone Round the World". A scoot up the coast from S America to N America in a tricked out canoe, escaping from persecution. As you may gather, my recollection is a bit filmy. You lot will know, I'm sure.

is this the one
http://www.ibiblio.org/eldritch/js/liberdade.htm
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  #102  
Old 8th December 2012, 00:29
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Yes - I was not disputeing the fact - she mentions it in her book - I think, - no, I am sure.
I repeat, :- Dlat x sec course would have solved the problem.
(after:- Dlong/DMP [Tan Co.] - of course.)
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  #103  
Old 8th December 2012, 05:42
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I have been searching for information about a book called "The Voyage of the Navidad" or some such thing, I think this was by Joshua Slocum and was often in the first part of his "Sailing Alone Round the World".
Yep, my copy of 'sailing alone around the world' has the voyage of the libertade as the first 'book'.
He built a sailing vessel of some description on the beach in Brasil after the ship he was master of was lost and sailed her home with his family.

The 'tricked up canoe' was Tilikum(sp)- an indian canoe from BC - which belongum to Captain Voss. He wrote the story of his circumnavigation in about 1900 and published it as 'The Venturesome Voyages of Captain Voss'
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  #104  
Old 8th December 2012, 17:39
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I just knew someone would winkle it out, thank you, that is what I was looking for.
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  #105  
Old 8th December 2012, 17:50
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Yes - I was not disputeing the fact - she mentions it in her book - I think, - no, I am sure.
I repeat, :- Dlat x sec course would have solved the problem.
(after:- Dlong/DMP [Tan Co.] - of course.)
sorry om, i was'nt being picky i just happened to light on a website with the information available.
it just shows how ill prepared some of these adventurers are.
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  #106  
Old 9th December 2012, 11:50
Leratty Leratty is offline  
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Cisco apropos TJ, yes feel you are right as to a bit of colouring possibly being involved or required in those style of books & he was a colourful character but still a true adventurer sadly apparently prone to having embellished his background? His last one that I read which I mistakenly said was with a catamaran in fact with a tri (God awful vessels) & his run ins with the communist authorities during that trip both scary as well as amusing.
Bulimore was the one with his yacht overturned & he was surviving in it until rescue by the RAN. The other in the same race was a French lady who was rescued as I recall by a English contestant who turned back for her thus loosing his position in the race but saving a life. She in fact with respect was a very experienced single hander & from memory a good looking lady too. It was Bulimore that some Australian Joe public got their knickers in a knot over as to costs, but Bulimore is a personable guy so it died a natural death. Richard
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  #107  
Old 10th December 2012, 09:14
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@86. Scelerat. Bill Tilman did not take a crew of impressionable youths to their deaths, next you will be telling me that that Putt & Co on Patanela were schoolboys. Bill Tilman was an amazing man who took to sailing in his 50's so he could reach mountains he couldn't reach by land. Sailing could even be said to have been incidental to his mountaineering.


Tristan Jones on the other hand was a BS Artiste of the first order.... ripping yarns for the gullible.
REad my post. I said impressionable people, not youths.
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  #108  
Old 10th December 2012, 23:19
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REad my post. I said impressionable people, not youths.
I believe the crew included some of Britain's most promising mountaineers... not what I would call impressionable people.... men on a mission...Smith Island if my memory serves.

There is a SN member that crewed with Tilman... he is also anything but impressionable .
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  #109  
Old 10th December 2012, 23:26
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Bulimore was the one with his yacht overturned & he was surviving in it until rescue by the RAN. The other in the same race was a French lady who was rescued as I recall by a English contestant who turned back for her thus loosing his position in the race but saving a life. She in fact with respect was a very experienced single hander & from memory a good looking lady too. It was Bulimore that some Australian Joe public got their knickers in a knot over as to costs, but Bulimore is a personable guy so it died a natural death. Richard
They picked up a Frenchman ....whose name escapes me ... at the same time as they rescued Bullimore. Nor can I recall the name of the Frenchman that a british sailor turned back to rescue well south of Tasmania. Isobel Autissier had to be rescued twice in two seperate races... can't remember where. She keeps her present boat in Puerto Williams... not sure where she sails these days as it doesn't seem to move very often but I don't think she races anymore.
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  #110  
Old 11th December 2012, 07:30
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Cisco I believe you may be confused with a much later Vende solo round world race. Maybe 2005-2008 (Bullimore more like 1997-98) & from memory the Frenchman name was Elies picked up in Indian Ocean with broken leg-arm?
Did not know about Isobel A having to be rescued a 2nd time, she must be getting on now as original would be maybe 15+ odd years ago? Don't believe Elies rescue would have been as challenging for RAN as Bullimore's? Richard
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  #111  
Old 11th December 2012, 07:43
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Nope... http://www.guardian.co.uk/fromthearc...985507,00.html

Thierry Dubois was rescued on the same day but pretty much ignored by the media when they arrived in Freo. You can see where he sits in the Guardian piece.

Isabelle according to Wiki .. "Isabelle Autissier (born 18 October 1956, Paris) is a French sailor, navigator, writer, and broadcaster. She is celebrated for being the first woman to have completed a solo world navigation in competition (BOC Challenge 1991).
While competing in the 1994-95 BOC Challenge Autissier's boat Ecureuil Poitou Charentes II was dismasted and severely damaged approximately 900 nautical miles (1,700 km) south of Adelaide, Australia. Autissier was rescued on 1 January 1995 by a Seahawk helicopter launched from the Royal Australian Navy frigate, HMAS Darwin.
In the 1998-99 Around Alone race Autissier was rescued by fellow competitor Giovanni Soldini when her boat PRB capsized approximately 1,900 miles (3,100 km) west of Cape Horn."

In the Bullimore race there was a yacht to yacht rescue south of Tas... can't remember the names.
In the late 90s I think the Australian was a little bit over rescuing singlehanded sailors. I can see why.
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  #112  
Old 11th December 2012, 07:55
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Golleee.. I've just been googling around looking for that incident south of hobart.... 'Rescue' and 'Vendee' .... enough to fill a book.
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  #113  
Old 11th December 2012, 08:46
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I believe the crew included some of Britain's most promising mountaineers... not what I would call impressionable people.... men on a mission...Smith Island if my memory serves.

There is a SN member that crewed with Tilman... he is also anything but impressionable .
They must have been impressionable if they thought that a voyage to S.Georgia in a clapped out old tug was a good idea! He was certainly irresponsible. Going on such an expedition at 79; what a potential burden he would have been to the rest of them.
Irresponsible, egocentric self indulgence of the highest order, acheiving absolutely nothing, at any level.
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  #114  
Old 11th December 2012, 15:47
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Farmer John I have read it. Have to say he must have been demented mainly due to lack of funds, his business in free fall then to leave with his crappy trimaran in such poor shape? How was it allowed even in those day by the committee, where were the inspections? He also must have been in a hell of a mental state to do what he did, worse then to walk off the vessel like that. What happened to the vessel it was picked up as i recall by a PSNC ship drifting? I know many will disagree however to me someone who commits suicide is brave, I could not, always thought if I tried I would bugger it up winding up as a quadriplegic ruining my day by making it worse, or some party saving me ): Na just live life for all its ups & downs enjoying the ride as apparently you are a long time dead.
It was a Royal Mail ship 'Picardy' who took Teignmouth Electron to Santa Domingo where ( I think) she pretty much rotted away.
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  #115  
Old 11th December 2012, 18:49
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They must have been impressionable if they thought that a voyage to S.Georgia in a clapped out old tug was a good idea! He was certainly irresponsible. Going on such an expedition at 79; what a potential burden he would have been to the rest of them.
Irresponsible, egocentric self indulgence of the highest order, acheiving absolutely nothing, at any level.
sorry but it wasn't his ship or his expedition .. from the great god wiki ...' On his last voyage in 1977, in his eightieth year, Tilman was invited to ship as crew in En Avant with mountaineers sailing to the South Atlantic to climb Smith Island. The expedition was led, and the boat skippered, by the youthful Simon Richardson. He and his crew aboard the old, converted steel tug made it successfully and without incident to Rio de Janeiro. Thereafter, en route to the Falkland Islands, they disappeared without trace - it was presumed the ship had foundered with all hands' .... it is thought that she made a bad landfall in the Falklands.

More here.... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Tilman ...

He was in his late 60s when he was skipper of Patanela on her successful Australian led expedition to Heard Island. I hope I am still out there doing interesting stuff when I hit 80.
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  #116  
Old 11th December 2012, 20:01
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This may be of some interest http://www.alpinejournal.org.uk/Cont...d%20Tilman.pdf

As may be the biography of Simon Richardson who was skipper on "En Avant" - written by his mother Dorothy and entitled "The Quest of Simon Richardson" - still available S/H on Amazon and a good read
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  #117  
Old 11th December 2012, 20:27
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This may be of some interest http://www.alpinejournal.org.uk/Cont...d%20Tilman.pdf

As may be the biography of Simon Richardson who was skipper on "En Avant" - written by his mother Dorothy and entitled "The Quest of Simon Richardson" - still available S/H on Amazon and a good read
Don't puncture the bubble of someone who knows things about others with certainty.

Simon Richardson had sailed with Tilman previously, he enjoyed what others thought a bit hard, the idea was that Tilman (still rugged at his age) could have kept the boat right while Simon Richardson and others would have done some mountaineering. This was a model that Tilman had followed with some success in his trips to the northern and southern bits of the earth.

I agree that "The Quest of Simon Richardson" is a good read, it also helps to understand why it happened and why he did it.

One explanation that I have heard for the loss of "En Avant" was the loss of some keel structure, designed to make the tug hull more sailable. I guess that if you have sailed a dinghy, and pulled the centre-board, you would know what the keel might have done.

In the planning, I see few faults that couldn't have been ironed out in the implementation. The technical barriers of construction and balancing of the boat may have been at fault.

Any one who thinks that Tilman attracted star struck people to follow him, have not read any of his books. You got a hard time, poor food and a taciturn man as skipper. Some took it and felt it suited them, some didn't. I don't think he sailed as Skipper on "En Avant", that role was probably Simon Richardsons.

I have no certainties about this.

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  #118  
Old 11th December 2012, 20:52
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Although we have drifted away from solo sailors Barrie's mention of David Lewis reminds me of his book "Icebound in Antarctica" which gives a description of how people who originally got on with each other fall out on an arduous voyage - the concept of sharing the one woman on board to relieve frustration which was suggested by one crew member raises a few eyebrows - even if it was not, shall we say, consummated.
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  #119  
Old 11th December 2012, 21:33
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Although we have drifted away from solo sailors Barrie's mention of David Lewis reminds me of his book "Icebound in Antarctica" which gives a description of how people who originally got on with each other fall out on an arduous voyage - the concept of sharing the one woman on board to relieve frustration which was suggested by one crew member raises a few eyebrows - even if it was not, shall we say, consummated.
That was where David Lewis lost me..... four blokes and two sheilas overwintering in Antarctica on a boat that only seated four around the saloon table. I think the boat was 'Dick Smith Explorer'. Lewis, one bloke, and the two sheilas settled down to a very long night of horizontal folk dancing down the back of the boat while the other two were eating off their laps in the focsle..... they asked to be evacuated by the americans half way through the winter. Not a well conceived voyage.
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  #120  
Old 11th December 2012, 22:23
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Not a well conceived voyage.
I hope nothing was conceived in those circumstances!
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  #121  
Old 12th December 2012, 08:33
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Yep, my copy of 'sailing alone around the world' has the voyage of the libertade as the first 'book'.
He built a sailing vessel of some description on the beach in Brasil after the ship he was master of was lost and sailed her home with his family.

The 'tricked up canoe' was Tilikum(sp)- an indian canoe from BC - which belongum to Captain Voss. He wrote the story of his circumnavigation in about 1900 and published it as 'The Venturesome Voyages of Captain Voss'
The Tilikum (I believe "welcome" in Coast Salish) was recovered from her ignominious end on a mud flat in England and is now restored and on display in the Maritime Museum in Victoria, B.C., Canada.
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  #122  
Old 19th December 2012, 12:11
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Cisco I stand corrected as I recalled the Bullimore rescue without the Frenchman but my memory did not bring up Thierry B rescue at that time. Possibly as I don't read Aus newspapers? Aussies should not be getting sick of rescues as plenty of them are rescued in other parts of the world without recriminations take the mountaineers, rock climbers etc. Bullimore is one tough customer don't know if he is still alive do know he went on to a number of other yacht races after that incident even possibly returning to Aus? Richard
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  #123  
Old 20th December 2012, 20:34
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Hello Richard, I think Oz was in 'yacht rescue overload' in the late 90s. The first case I know of anyone making a fuss was in the late 40s. Quite a few years ago I came across an article in a copy of an old oz yachting magazine. Seems some yachts in an NZ-Sydney yacht race were overdue.... the RAAF on its own initiative sent out a Lincoln bomber to have a looksee... people whinged.

Moving right along I see Singapore was refusing permission for some Burmese boat people to land from a Vietnamese ship the other day.... the more things change the more they stay the same...
Cheers, Frank
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  #124  
Old 21st December 2012, 10:19
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Hi Frank well anyone getting their nickers in a knot over a rescue in my humble opinion is a miserable rectal passage & would be the first to seek same if they were ever in a position to require same though guess they sit in their arm chairs & mumble on about fools wastes of money etc. Yes we all know there are sometimes rescues that are carried out that should not have got to the stage of the party having to be. I did a couple of Sydney Hobart's experiencing pretty rugged weather on a 36' sloop. In those days Frank no Dan buoys, safety harnesses let alone sat rescue beacons etc. When I saw the yacht we did one in some years (90's ) later I was amazed we had the idiocy or was it.....?
Singapore, well hey that means Aus is not alone refusing illegal refuges? Note the never head for Japan or China?
Was that Dick Smith Explorer the ugly schooner he bought for the Antarctic voyages, think she may have done a couple? Disappointed to hear that David Lewis could have been a tad of a lecher though had a wry smile about those who were not enjoying the fruits of the females asking to get evacuated by the Yanks, now that is a rescue unnecessary! Richard
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  #125  
Old 21st December 2012, 10:41
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'now that is a rescue unnecessary! Richard'

I guess it was either that or go blind..... I recall the 'Merkins making a fuss about private expeditions shouldn't be allowed to go to antarctica....

Yes I think DSE was a schooner...

Re cost of rescue etc .... a few years ago some englishman was rescued for - I think - the third time after leaving Bluff NZ to row around the world.
They confiscated his boat...when asked if that was legal they said 'probably not but its the only way we are going to stop him doing it again........'
Frank
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