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  #51  
Old 1st July 2012, 13:56
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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thats the trouble with the youth of today they have no taste,i suppose thats becouse there is such a lot of ready to go food that they cannot wait for food to be prepared my son and his missus have gone to asda to get the sunday dinner all ready cooked,haveing worked in the Galley for 5 years it drives me mad.I told them next week I do all the cooking. Regards
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  #52  
Old 2nd July 2012, 12:51
Rooney1. Rooney1. is offline
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How about curried pig tails ?.
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  #53  
Old 2nd July 2012, 15:10
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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My beautiful daughter,like her mother blonde and blue eyed,can`t cook to save her life.She buys her food from M&S prepacked and cooked her daughters,not surprisingly come here to eat regularly the young one always asks for a chicken dinner.they both have good taste and it comes from eating here with us.How can a woman as intelligent as her cook so lazily it costs more,you get less and it looks bad.
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  #54  
Old 2nd July 2012, 23:18
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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Originally Posted by alan ward View Post
My beautiful daughter,like her mother blonde and blue eyed,can`t cook to save her life.She buys her food from M&S prepacked and cooked her daughters,not surprisingly come here to eat regularly the young one always asks for a chicken dinner.they both have good taste and it comes from eating here with us.How can a woman as intelligent as her cook so lazily it costs more,you get less and it looks bad.
The other thing Alan that drives me mad is they buy the fruit in plastic cartons eat a bit of it then say its not sweet enought so I took the black grapes off her and put it on the window sill facing the sun and said wait 2 days then eat them,the shock on her face when she did was worth the wait,and they throw so much food away becouse of the sell by date yet its still perfectly good to eat.I think I have my hands full just to get them to mend their lazy ways .
like you my grand son always came here on the weekends and loved his nanna's cooking espesh sundays followed by Pudding Regards Tony
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  #55  
Old 3rd July 2012, 04:04
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Salt junk or the like had passed its used by date by the time I went to sea but on joining the little banana boat MV Navua I was intrigued to see a beautifully crafted wooden barrel lashed down in the tiller flat. It was oval in shape, tapering from bottom to top with a volume of about fifty gallons. A question as to its purpose prompted Sparky to search ship builder Henry Robb’s original inventory list to find that it was supplied as a salt meat barrel. Perhaps this is proof that at the ship build date of 1955 it was still a requirement that some British ships victualed with salt junk.
A little time later the subject of home brewed beer came up and in next to no time a brew of someone’s best was laid down in this ideal brewing vessel. A voyage to the Pacific Islands and back to Auckland during winter the widely varying temperatures spelled disaster for the brewing process and after a couple more attempts the commercially brewed product won back the day.


The barrel came to an ignominious end when it finished up in the engine room parked under the Colchester lathe headstock and filled with dirty overalls. The lathe revolving at low speed driving a reciprocating plunger furnished with a big flap of insertion rubber got garments squeaky clean especially when aided by a couple of cakes of Union Co toilet soap.
A Cooper would be a rare tradesman today.

Bob
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  #56  
Old 6th July 2012, 13:42
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Tell you what Spongebob that barrel is worth about 80 if stamped and authenticated and even more somewhere like the east coast of the states.We used to get a Boston buyer over here and that homespun stuff was always his thing.
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  #57  
Old 6th July 2012, 13:44
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Tony,same thing with avocadoes,they buy `em and then can`t eat `em.Does anyone grow the seeds in glasses anymore?
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  #58  
Old 6th July 2012, 14:45
chadburn chadburn is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyAllen View Post
thats the trouble with the youth of today they have no taste,i suppose thats becouse there is such a lot of ready to go food that they cannot wait for food to be prepared my son and his missus have gone to asda to get the sunday dinner all ready cooked,haveing worked in the Galley for 5 years it drives me mad.I told them next week I do all the cooking. Regards
The Cook on the last deep sea vessel I was Chief on the "Irenes Rhapsody" use to serve up "meljanis", it was superb and worth the wait.
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  #59  
Old 6th July 2012, 15:14
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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The Cook on the last deep sea vessel I was Chief on the "Irenes Rhapsody" use to serve up "meljanis", it was superb and worth the wait.

What was that?
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  #60  
Old 6th July 2012, 18:59
chadburn chadburn is offline  
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It is a Greek recipe, the Irenes was Greek owned. Cut aubergines in half, stuff with mince and onion's and bake in the oven.
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  #61  
Old 6th July 2012, 23:15
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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It is a Greek recipe, the Irenes was Greek owned. Cut aubergines in half, stuff with mince and onion's and bake in the oven.
My late wife made a great stuffed aubergine,was tought to make it by a sargents wife in athens who was a greek lady and became a favorite meal of ours Regards tony
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  #62  
Old 9th September 2012, 16:37
Ducado Ducado is offline
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It's American Corned Beef and very good it is too!
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  #63  
Old 9th September 2012, 17:19
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My Daughter's bloke is Jamaican and has some great recipes for all sorts of food, often very spicy. I really wanted to try Saltfish and Ackee, when it was served I found that the Saltfish just triggered a gag reflex, so that didn't get a fair trial.

I love brisket and corned beef, the brisket wants a good long cooking. Oxtail is great too, I think the bones and the tough bits cook down to give that dark gravy... Got to stop, drool is shorting my keyboard.
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  #64  
Old 10th September 2012, 03:09
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Oxtail is great too, I think the bones and the tough bits cook down to give that dark gravy... Got to stop, drool is shorting my keyboard.
John,
We use a "slow pot" method in the oven, ususally lamb neck:

Fry till browned neck sections previously coated with flour. Remove and put to one side.
In the same pan, put two finely chopped garlic and one finely sliced onion. fry till transparent. Add 1-2 glasses of red wine. Salt and pepper. Simmer until bubbling.
Put all ingredients in earthenware oven pot with lid. Coarsely chop carrot and add.
Cook in oven at 180C for 1-2 hours.
Enjoy! (Great gravy and melt in your mouth meat!)
Rgds.
Dave
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  #65  
Old 10th September 2012, 17:24
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Originally Posted by makko View Post
John,
We use a "slow pot" method in the oven, ususally lamb neck:

Fry till browned neck sections previously coated with flour. Remove and put to one side.
In the same pan, put two finely chopped garlic and one finely sliced onion. fry till transparent. Add 1-2 glasses of red wine. Salt and pepper. Simmer until bubbling.
Put all ingredients in earthenware oven pot with lid. Coarsely chop carrot and add.
Cook in oven at 180C for 1-2 hours.
Enjoy! (Great gravy and melt in your mouth meat!)
Rgds.
Dave
Well, that's it, I have invested in a waterproof keyboard. We got educated to cooking and eating everything when we had our own lambs in the orchard of the house that went with the farming job.
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  #66  
Old 30th March 2013, 08:27
Fred Field Fred Field is offline  
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Its always been on sale in the big grocery chains here.
Sells in 1 gallon pails as "Naval Beef" and is a favourite with our Newfoundland citizens who serve it up in "Jiggs Dinner"
Boiled vegetables, eg Carrots, cabbage, turnip, potato and salt beef all in the same pot. One cupful of split peas is also added
The beef is drained and soaked overnight in fresh water


Newfoundland was also the only place I've ever been where the grocers actually sell "Hard Tack". They soak it for twenty-four hours (it really is HARD!), boil it with salt cod and then serve it up as what they call "Fish and Brewis", which is purported to be the national dish of Newfoundland. It's also the only place I ever was in a restaurant that served fried codfish cheeks and tongues, which are a great Newfie favorite. They also regard seal flippers as a delicacy.
I am not sure but I believe the 'Naval' part is because it was used by the Royal Navy when Newfoundland, as a British Colony, was 'ruled' by Royal Navy admirals, known locally as 'Fishing Admirals'

As for the 'Jiggs Dinner' what you describe is the 'traditional' one but what a lot of Newfies do is serve a roast of some kind with it.
I have never seen the split peas added straight to the pot, always done in a 'pease pudding bag', which are sold in stores, or you can make your own.
Something else my wife's family, and many others, do is serve it with spotted dick, on the same plate. The first time I saw that served was by my future mother-in-law (we did not know that bit at the time) and I made some comment about about 'spotted dick' with the main course, the women were horrified. I have since been forgiven and introduced them to horseradish sauce with beef, which is generally well liked.

Hard Tack the Newfies generally refer to that as 'hard bread' and it is made by a local company and sold across Canada, mainly in Newfie speciality stores in centres where there sufficient Newfies to support such an enterprise.

Flipper pie, if correctly cooked, is delicious, it is one Newfie dish dearly beloved has not mastered, ma-in-law used to make a good job of it.
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  #67  
Old 31st March 2013, 02:27
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good day binnacle,sm.22,october.2009,19:46 re:salt beef.just been reading the salt beef thread.there are certainly different ways of cooking it.i found it all very amusing.i showed the wife some of the ways you all cook your beef,she said she was having corned beef tonight,and it woul;d be cooked as usual.i might add the corned beef here is the best we ever had,enjoy your week end,ben27
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  #68  
Old 2nd April 2013, 03:23
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Samsette Samsette is offline  
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Corned beef

Corned beef, carrots, cabbage and onions was called New England Boiled Dinner on one Bluey I sailed on, in the late forties.

It used to be the fifty cent daily special at the cafe across from the Bay Street, TO bus depot in the mid-fifties. The cheapest meal in town.
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  #69  
Old 2nd April 2013, 06:15
kauvaka kauvaka is offline  
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Had salt beef (known as silverside in NZ) today with kumara, carrots and bok choy plus onion sauce. Very nice too.
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  #70  
Old 3rd April 2013, 12:11
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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We put brisket on the menu here and it sells well
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  #71  
Old 3rd April 2013, 12:31
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Flipper Pie! Imagine the distress of a seal, wakening from its clubbing, only to find that it can't type!

John T
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  #72  
Old 3rd April 2013, 12:34
Fred Field Fred Field is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alan ward View Post
We put brisket on the menu here and it sells well
My opinion, for what it is worth, is that if it is cooked 'correctly' it is delicious.
Additionally it used to be the cheapest cut from a side of beef, so not only did it taste good but was also very economical.
During dearly beloved's first visit to the UK, to among other things, meet future in-laws Mum cooked it and served it, enjoyed by one and all. We tried it during our camping trip through Europe the same year and the future Missus got sick. We have not had it since.
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  #73  
Old 3rd April 2013, 12:37
Fred Field Fred Field is offline  
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Originally Posted by trotterdotpom View Post
Flipper Pie! Imagine the distress of a seal, wakening from its clubbing, only to find that it can't type!

John T
Love it!
Only thing is if it is properly 'clubbed' it does not wake up, unlike Jolly Jack who usually does.
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  #74  
Old 3rd April 2013, 23:28
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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Originally Posted by alan ward View Post
We put brisket on the menu here and it sells well
yeerss, trying to get my son to put it on the menu in his tavern for sunday lunch but meeting resistance from the young "CHEF "if you are ever down ormskirk way let me know i'll treat you to a meal,same for anyone else down this way cheers
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  #75  
Old 4th April 2013, 02:19
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Samsette Samsette is offline  
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Flank?

Brisket? Is that also known as flank whatever? We have a couple of butcher shops that sometimes put out London Broil, a rolled up piece of flank with stuffing, tied with string and cut into sections. I said sometimes, because the beef carcase has only a small amount of this cut on it.

Crispy and tasty, depending on what the butcher has stuffed it with.
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