What goes on in the Galley. - Ships Nostalgia
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What goes on in the Galley.

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  #1  
Old 29th March 2009, 21:36
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Macphail Macphail is offline  
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What goes on in the Galley.

The Captain complained many times about his tough steak, sent it back, the cook threw it on the galley floor, stamped on it a lot, brushed it down, heated it up, applied a nice sauce, happy Captain.
Chief Engineer treated his steward like S**it, chicken curry, he had only bones, the rest had meat.
We have all had the half cockie in the stew, where is the other half.
How many bogies in the soup.
The Captain and Chief Engineer had an extended lunch time G &T, came down for late lunch, all gone, the cook had thrown everything overboard including his pots and pans.

Tell us about the Galley.
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  #2  
Old 29th March 2009, 21:48
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Depending on peoples honesty there should be some good un's to come here. Never a true'r saying at sea than "Don't upset the cook".
I once had a lecky who kept nicking my dinner out the hot press. I knew it was him coz he was caught red handed on more than one occassion. So I made a special gravy up one day consisting of mainly corn flour, and the day after, and the day after. Yep you guessed it his bowel movements slowly became less regular to the point where he went to the chief steward for laxatives. "Just stop nicking the cooks dinner" said the chief steward and you'll be fine.

LOL KEV
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  #3  
Old 29th March 2009, 22:25
hughesy hughesy is offline  
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"Rule Number one, make friends with The Cook"
Mind you just about every one of em , was a raging "bevvie merchant"
Not suprised really, its hard graft in the "Patrick O"Malley", getting the grub
ready for the Herbs.
Not to mention the other mob in the Saloon lol.
I guess they needed a few bevvies to take the edge off like??
They never had many days off, full on every day, getting it on the table.
Yeah, got a lot of respect for the "Old Babbling Brook"

all the best
Huighesy
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  #4  
Old 29th March 2009, 22:44
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At RAF Henlow one dinner time I had the last piece of pie. As I was helping myself to the veggies, one of the cooks took the empty pie tray, and as he entered the kitchen he shouted out, "They've eaten it! They've bloody well eaten it!!" I looked down at my plate, and said to myself, "Aw what the hell!" then carried on. Dunno what it was, but I survived!
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  #5  
Old 29th March 2009, 22:50
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Who called the cook a clot. Who called the clot a cook?. Well something like that

It was my job to walk around the Galley making sure that food was not picked up off the deck and put back on the plate after falling on it, or gobbed on. No wonder so many got the runs if these things happened

But one day, on Arcadia I did witness something, and very naughtily did nothing. There was a real swine of a passenger, treating all crew like dirt in the aft restaurant, especially his Goanese steward who like all Goan crew, was a lovely man. The Section Waiter, or wine steward as they usually are today was European. He came back into the Galley fuming, swearing like a trooper, calling this passenger every bastard in the book. The passenger had turned the wine down, saying it was too warm. In between calling him a bastard, and goodness know what else, he had time between the foul words to spit into the bottle. He put the top back on and took the same bottle back. Not long after he came back, smiling from ear to ear. The passenger had accepted it. All he was doing was being a swine and trying to impress others on his table that he understood wine.

I did warn the Section Steward that if I saw that again he would be logged, and I reported quite a few for bad hygiene, including seeing similar to what the Section Waiter did.

So yes, this went on all the time, and more out of the gaze of others I would imagine. They all usually went quiet when one of us in the medical department wandered through the Galley, being on their best behaviour. That is why I always picked my own grub up on Arcadia

The bottom line is if we saw half that went on, we would not eat anything

David

Last edited by Pompeyfan; 29th March 2009 at 22:56..
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  #6  
Old 29th March 2009, 23:49
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Saw the mates dinner get passed around the galley on an RFA tanker and the 4 cooks all adding there own special ingredients,before serving it to him.Wasn't a nice thing to do but then again he wasn't a very nice man!
Kev
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  #7  
Old 30th March 2009, 21:51
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Your right Kev and Huighesy

Always keep on the good side of Cookie, is everything OK in the galley, do you have any problems in your cabin, are you happy with the shower.

John.
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  #8  
Old 30th March 2009, 22:24
macca57 macca57 is offline  
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We had one Purser on the Clan Ranald, who served nut burger rings two or three times a week, his wife travelling with him complained about the fare he servd up, his response keep quiet.
The Chief Nooky Nichols was becoming fed up with the fare provided, so he instigated a nightly midnigh raid on the ships fridges.
He cooked excellent food on the baby Belling in the Engineers mess.
One day the Captain at breakfast said to the remarked to the Chief, two things, firstly he expressed concern that the engineeers didn't appear for breakfast, and that it wasn't good for us, how could we after having a meal at midnight.
Secondly, at midnight a strange smell permeates the ship (she was A/C), it was the captains way of telling us to back off.
Strangely enough the food quaility and menus improved after that.
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  #9  
Old 30th March 2009, 23:47
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  #10  
Old 31st March 2009, 00:10
Klaatu83 Klaatu83 is offline  
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Lykes Lines were the second worst feeders I ever sailed on. We once had 22 cases of food poisoning during a single voyage. That's not counting a Peruvian beggar. One of the crew took pity on him and gave him some of our night lunch to eat. A few minutes later we saw him vomiting on the dock.

Bad as "Leaky Brothers" were, however, The Military Sealift Command (the U.S. equivalent of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary) were even worse. There it was still common practice to strain the flour though a sieve to remove the weevils, which didn't always work. The cockroaches, which were everywhere, were euphemistically known as "land-shrimp". Once we were given pork fried rice for lunch. Mine came with a great big bay leaf in it. I turned the bay leaf over, and it had legs! When I showed it to the Old Man he simply said, "What are you complaining about? That's the only fresh meat you're likely to get on this ship".
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  #11  
Old 31st March 2009, 11:59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Macphail View Post
The Captain complained many times about his tough steak, sent it back, the cook threw it on the galley floor, stamped on it a lot, brushed it down, heated it up, applied a nice sauce, happy Captain.
Chief Engineer treated his steward like S**it, chicken curry, he had only bones, the rest had meat.
We have all had the half cockie in the stew, where is the other half.
How many bogies in the soup.
The Captain and Chief Engineer had an extended lunch time G &T, came down for late lunch, all gone, the cook had thrown everything overboard including his pots and pans.

Tell us about the Galley.
Many years ago on the British Industry, Falmouth Dry Dock, pantry staff were late finishing every evening due to Chief officer, Ch Engineer and second, being late always had a drink before the meal and used to arrive after we had finished. most times we had some left overs plated off and this was served.
One evening they came in late evryting was in the gash bucket, on the menu we had poached haddock and poached egg on top. both were lying in the gash buckets covered in gravy, custard and other left overs, we managed to drag out three pieces of fish and wash them off and found three hard poched eggs which looked like big orange eyes as the whites had got lost. We served it and they never complained. Must have been good beer they were drinking.

I remember when I was first cook, crew used to call me Doc, as most ships cooks were called, like evrything else the name faded away with the years.

Moral to the story dont ---k with the catering staff.

Spence.
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  #12  
Old 31st March 2009, 12:10
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Yup! When I first went to sea I was an arrogant little sh1t with the galley stewards. I guess my immune system had a lot to work on
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  #13  
Old 31st March 2009, 15:57
ALAN TYLER ALAN TYLER is offline  
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As a "Doc" from years gone by I always wondered why certain crew used to take a delight in coming in late for meals. Did it somehow make them think they were more important than others? I don,t like to admit it but many a meal came from the "gash/rosy bucket,for these types. I always remember a cooks saying " I don,t know who sh.. in my shoe but I know who ate it" Would we really go that far!! Bon Appetit.
P.S. Latecomers excused when docking or breakdowns.
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  #14  
Old 31st March 2009, 16:06
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Must add to this later
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  #15  
Old 31st March 2009, 16:29
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revenge is sweet or maybe savoury

i can't see much point in all this revenge, by the addition of various body fluids to the meals and serving straight from the gash bucket, if the victims did'nt know they had been paid back.
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  #16  
Old 31st March 2009, 17:25
trucker trucker is offline
 
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mince

marvelous what some cooks , could do with a leg of mince.i see this thread is called what goes on in the galley.a couple of ships i sailed on,not much went on. by the state of the food that was served.ooooooo-that pan just missed me.

Last edited by trucker; 31st March 2009 at 17:46..
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  #17  
Old 31st March 2009, 20:22
David W David W is online now  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pompeyfan View Post
Who called the cook a clot. Who called the clot a cook?. Well something like that

It was my job to walk around the Galley making sure that food was not picked up off the deck and put back on the plate after falling on it, or gobbed on. No wonder so many got the runs if these things happened

But one day, on Arcadia I did witness something, and very naughtily did nothing. There was a real swine of a passenger, treating all crew like dirt in the aft restaurant, especially his Goanese steward who like all Goan crew, was a lovely man. The Section Waiter, or wine steward as they usually are today was European. He came back into the Galley fuming, swearing like a trooper, calling this passenger every bastard in the book. The passenger had turned the wine down, saying it was too warm. In between calling him a bastard, and goodness know what else, he had time between the foul words to spit into the bottle. He put the top back on and took the same bottle back. Not long after he came back, smiling from ear to ear. The passenger had accepted it. All he was doing was being a swine and trying to impress others on his table that he understood wine.

I did warn the Section Steward that if I saw that again he would be logged, and I reported quite a few for bad hygiene, including seeing similar to what the Section Waiter did.

So yes, this went on all the time, and more out of the gaze of others I would imagine. They all usually went quiet when one of us in the medical department wandered through the Galley, being on their best behaviour. That is why I always picked my own grub up on Arcadia

The bottom line is if we saw half that went on, we would not eat anything

David
Who called that nurse a nugget, who called that nugget a nurse, well something like that.

I never sailed in liners so I didnt know that nurses carried out galley inspections, so I have 2 queries,
a. Was this usual in all big ship company's, or just P&O.
b. I am sure that the big ship galleys worked more or less 24 hours a day, did that mean the nursing staff working a 3 watch system.

With regard to cargo ships, a good galley staff usually produced good food, within the constraints of the company provided stores, and it was usually appreciated by most of the crew. There were, of course, one or two dissenting voices, these were quite often owned by people whose espicurean expertise, and discerning palate, had been honed to perfection, in such notable eateries as dock yard canteens, chip shops and Stan Waters. But, never the less, when such less than complimentary remarks reached the ears of the galley brigade they took it to heart, and usually turned to and by combining their multi talents produced something really special for consumption by those Egons Ronays of the seven seas. Quite often the recipient of such special diets recognised the thought that had gone into their treat and rapidly joined the rest of the crew in appreciating the efforts of the galley staff.

By the way, does anyone remember Goddards Plate Powder. ?

Last edited by David W; 31st March 2009 at 20:29..
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  #18  
Old 31st March 2009, 20:52
Steve Woodward Steve Woodward is offline  
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Must add to this later
Im not sure I want to know the answer to this
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  #19  
Old 31st March 2009, 21:43
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Sailed on one ship where the main meal was Braised Steak 5 minutes befoe a very hungry crew were due to come in the ship bounced and the braised steaks went everywhere under the hotpress fridges so the cook had us chase them all down he knocked up a quick gravy and just as the crew came in the steak went down well and luckily no one got poisoned ! What you dont know cant hurt you !!!!
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Old 31st March 2009, 23:24
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Hey, what's this? Someone criticising Stan Waters.
I'll have you know their bacon butties were second to none. Especially when served up by a pretty girl with a snotty nose and a sore finger.

Derek
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  #21  
Old 1st April 2009, 01:22
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Hey, what's this? Someone criticising Stan Waters.
I'll have you know their bacon butties were second to none. Especially when served up by a pretty girl with a snotty nose and a sore finger.

Derek
As a Liverpool lad my epicurean expertise was honed by the likes of Stan Waters and Laytons opposite the Brunswick. Hence I never complained, the finest meal any man will have is the next one, and the finest sauce is hunger.
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  #22  
Old 5th April 2009, 10:51
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Quote:
I always wondered why certain crew used to take a delight in coming in late for meals.
Cannot tell a lie - 2/E and I used to have an end of watch rum (or two) and stagger into breakfast - sorry
I guess it was thoughtless rudeness rather than intentional arrogance.
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  #23  
Old 5th April 2009, 11:16
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I came up off watch one day as the Cook/steward was leaving the galley with a tray. A couple of seamen asked where are you going with that?. the cook replied "The Captain wants his meal on the bridge" the seaman replied "favoritism eh! whats he got that we dont get?. he then uncovered the plate, lifted the buttered cabbage and spat on it. the cook carried on with his mission to the bridge with the contaminated meal. The thought of the Skipper eating that (and he did and enjoyed it) made me feel queasy.
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  #24  
Old 5th April 2009, 11:26
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Greetings,

I sort of half remember a 1950/60's B/W movie set on some American war canoe. The point of my story was that on the dinner menu was Mince, Hungarian Goulash and Chicken Fricasee. The first wardroom steward goes into the galley and asks for "1 Mince on toast", the second steward goes into the galley and asks for "1 Hungarian Goulash" which was duly plated up from the same pot as the Mince and the third steward asks for "1 Chicken Fricasee". At this point the cook explodes shouting, "Nobody told me that Chicken Fricasee was on the menu". He then broke an egg into the mince, stirred it around, dispensed a ladleful onto a plate and said, "One Chicken Fricasee". I suspect there is an awful ring of truth in that salutory tale.
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  #25  
Old 5th April 2009, 12:33
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Captains Tiger.

Quote:
Originally Posted by billyboy View Post
I came up off watch one day as the Cook/steward was leaving the galley with a tray. A couple of seamen asked where are you going with that?. the cook replied "The Captain wants his meal on the bridge" the seaman replied "favoritism eh! whats he got that we dont get?. he then uncovered the plate, lifted the buttered cabbage and spat on it. the cook carried on with his mission to the bridge with the contaminated meal. The thought of the Skipper eating that (and he did and enjoyed it) made me feel queasy.
I did see a captains tiger flange the rim of the captains coffee cup prior to pouring the coffee mumbling, I'll teach that bastard for getting on to me.
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