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  #26  
Old 11th March 2010, 15:59
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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We have brisket of beef 3 out of 4 sundays slow pot roasted until tender then stand on a slicing board to cool.When cold it slices nice and thin to make the best sandwhiches with a full grain mustard and a cold beer mmmmm Regards Tony
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  #27  
Old 17th March 2010, 02:53
Naytikos Naytikos is offline  
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'Salt Beef and Beans' is one of the classic dishes throughout the English-speaking Caribbean.
As stated by Lakercapt it comes in one-gallon (US gallon) pails either with or without bones. Rinsed a couple of times and then simmered with hot peppers and black beans, it is usually eaten with rice cooked in coconut milk.
Hard to choose between salt beef & beans, curried goat, or oxtail for a real treat!
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  #28  
Old 29th March 2010, 20:01
John Tremelling John Tremelling is offline  
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I have had salt beef on passenger ships (not these grotesque looking pack as many onboard as you can cruise ships), quaintly entitled 'Boiled Beef and Carrots'. Make it sound like something the 'poor people of the East End' eat and the toffs lap it up.
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  #29  
Old 30th March 2010, 17:19
Hugh Grant Hugh Grant is offline  
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I remember in 1951 on board the Ivybank the chief engineer an irish man took the fridge engin to bits and could not get it to start again. WE had to salt the meat into milk churns by adding salt to water and to get the right salt content we added salt till the potatoe floated on the top of the water the the cuts of meat were added to the churns. The likes of liver ,kidneys and sausages were dumped over the side, until some of the crew took it off us and cooked there and then . The older crew had a great time with the salt meat but the younger one didnt think it was all that marvelous, The frige engine was repaired in Auckland and the fridges restocked. I never found out what Capt Freddy Hale said to the chief
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  #30  
Old 30th March 2010, 19:19
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Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is offline  
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Was this boiled beef and carrots the same as I saw often in Blue Funnel ships, which was beef with the carrot already inserted into the meat somehow? It certainly wasnt normal type beef, it was roughly circular and was 50% fat/gristle, and was usually discarded into the gash bucket.
Pat
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  #31  
Old 30th March 2010, 19:47
John Tremelling John Tremelling is offline  
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It was not as you describe Pat, sliced beef, boiled or mashed potatoes and carrots. I always enjoyed it, but then, apprentices will generally eat (and drink) anything.
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  #32  
Old 30th March 2010, 19:55
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Beef a la mode

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Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy View Post
Was this boiled beef and carrots the same as I saw often in Blue Funnel ships, which was beef with the carrot already inserted into the meat somehow? It certainly wasnt normal type beef, it was roughly circular and was 50% fat/gristle, and was usually discarded into the gash bucket.
Pat
Beef a la mode was the beef with the carrot inserted.Usually the cheapest joints of beef were used.Apple pie a la mode never had a carrot but had ice cream.
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  #33  
Old 6th April 2010, 11:04
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Andrew Craig-Bennett Andrew Craig-Bennett is offline  
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"Jimmy's Kitchen" in Hong Kong is an institution, because it has never changed its menu from the 1930's (and it seemed to me to employ every single steward and cook who went ashore from CNCo ) and it does a very good "Corned Beef and Cabbage" which is of course salt beef.

But I suspect that salt beef as served in a restaurant is veryy different from the stuff that came out of the harness cask in the days of square rig when, according to Basil Lubbock, you were advised "not to pass to leeward of the harness cask"!
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  #34  
Old 6th April 2010, 11:28
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Binnacle Binnacle is offline  
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Originally Posted by DMA View Post
Guess what I found in the fridge.One of the hazzards of marrying an East Coaster!!
I've never tasted that variety, I think I would like to know the origins of the navel.
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  #35  
Old 6th April 2010, 19:06
R396040 R396040 is offline  
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Thumbs up Salt Beef

When I think of salt beef it automatically brings back memories of the Jewish snack bar just across from the famous Windmill theatre in Londons Soho in the fifties. Working by ships in the Royal Docks and in the evening going "west" to experience a slightly different feel to the pubs of Woolwich or West or East Ham and after a few pints a really mindblowing salt beef sandwich from above mentioned snack bar where you sometimes met up with the showgirls from the Windmill but sadly only to stop & stare. Other ladies were more available if you had a big enough sub. Happy days. In comparison to those sandwiches think Montreal offered the best ones.
Stuart
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  #36  
Old 7th April 2010, 12:59
lakercapt lakercapt is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Binnacle View Post
I've never tasted that variety, I think I would like to know the origins of the navel.
Was naval beef not belly button stuff we got with the "Newfie" crew
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  #37  
Old 7th April 2010, 14:47
the brit the brit is offline  
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smoked meat

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Originally Posted by R396040 View Post
When I think of salt beef it automatically brings back memories of the Jewish snack bar just across from the famous Windmill theatre in Londons Soho in the fifties. Working by ships in the Royal Docks and in the evening going "west" to experience a slightly different feel to the pubs of Woolwich or West or East Ham and after a few pints a really mindblowing salt beef sandwich from above mentioned snack bar where you sometimes met up with the showgirls from the Windmill but sadly only to stop & stare. Other ladies were more available if you had a big enough sub. Happy days. In comparison to those sandwiches think Montreal offered the best ones.
Stuart
yes still going strong here in montreal schwartz's probably the best known and longest serving still on the main(saint laurent boulevard)
http://www.schwartzsdeli.com/index_eng.html maybe this will bring back memorys.
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  #38  
Old 8th April 2010, 08:41
R396040 R396040 is offline  
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Smile Salt Beef

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Originally Posted by the brit View Post
yes still going strong here in montreal schwartz's probably the best known and longest serving still on the main(saint laurent boulevard)
http://www.schwartzsdeli.com/index_eng.html maybe this will bring back memorys.
Yep that brings back memories too. besides the salt beef which were Good......
Down St Laurent and St Catherines usually after the first beer in Joe Beefs on the waterfront when I was sailing on Cunard cargo boats 50s/60s/ Great
Stuartmemries of Canada
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  #39  
Old 8th April 2010, 10:37
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Binnacle Binnacle is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakercapt View Post
Was naval beef not belly button stuff we got with the "Newfie" crew
Bill,
I suspected, wrongly, the manufacturer had used a French term and this was indeed French junk, however navel does not appear in a googled French dictionary.
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  #40  
Old 20th May 2010, 20:30
EBenarty EBenarty is offline  
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In Shetland and Orkney they make what is called Reasted Mutton which is mutton salted then dried It does not look appetising but tastes delicious !!
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  #41  
Old 25th May 2010, 20:56
ALAN TYLER ALAN TYLER is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EBenarty View Post
In Shetland and Orkney they make what is called Reasted Mutton which is mutton salted then dried It does not look appetising but tastes delicious !!
I,ll take your word for that on the taste, maybe it needs a sprig of parsley to add to its looks!!!
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  #42  
Old 14th October 2011, 15:15
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Billieboy View Post
Brisket of beef! the most God awful meal ever served on a ship! next to dried salt cod that is!
I say steady on old chap,what about salt leg of pork,corned ox tongue?They always had that petrol on water,rainbow gleam on the sauces.Probably the saltpetre.
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  #43  
Old 14th October 2011, 15:21
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Originally Posted by Billieboy View Post
I hope I'm not getting mixed up BT, I was thinking of that red and white, salted beef; not too thinly sliced, with that dark brown oxtail tasting gravy poured over it! I'm definately off the salt cod, sailed with a Liverpool captain once who liked to eat it every day, bloody bonkers he was!
I used to drink in a pub called the White Horse in Woolton village Liverpool one of my regular companions was a fishermonger who owned Charles`once a famous name.He told me that they used to sell bales and bales of salt or stock cod/fish on a saturday as it was a traditional Liverpool sunday breakfast.
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  #44  
Old 14th October 2011, 23:12
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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Alan being from Kensington we always had salt fish every sunday morning like most of the people on the kensington fields estate,bought off the man with the cart also had spare ribs sat night.Having 5 brothers we all had to chip in for the ribs ma would not buy them she said that was extra Tony
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  #45  
Old 15th October 2011, 01:12
stevie burgess stevie burgess is offline  
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Corned leg of pork is lovely. My local butcher has never even heard of it...although he's a very good butcher. I only wish i could get some now. Mind you i enjoyed some salt herring yesterday...followed by a few beers!!...great.
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  #46  
Old 16th October 2011, 11:05
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyAllen View Post
Alan being from Kensington we always had salt fish every sunday morning like most of the people on the kensington fields estate,bought off the man with the cart also had spare ribs sat night.Having 5 brothers we all had to chip in for the ribs ma would not buy them she said that was extra Tony
Ribs and cabbage,I had a girlfriend whose grandparents lived off Walton Road,George and Helen Hurley first time I ever tasted ribs I was expecting pork BBQ and didn`t like the look of bacon ribs when I first saw them the first taste had me as a convert

By the way have you seen Kensington lately?our grandaughter has just started university in Preston and we drove home through Liverpool to see if there were any liners down at the pierhead.I got lost on my way out.Lost in Liverpool!
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  #47  
Old 16th October 2011, 11:39
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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[By the way have you seen Kensington lately?our grandaughter has just started university in Preston and we drove home through Liverpool to see if there were any liners down at the pierhead.I got lost on my way out.Lost in Liverpool![/QUOTE]

This comes under the term improvement ? did go thru a while back to show my grandson our old house and like you with so many one way streets I was lost trying to get out of the estate Tony

PS nice to see so many posts from you lately have, you now retired and ready to enjoy to yourself !!!!!!!

Last edited by TonyAllen; 16th October 2011 at 11:42..
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  #48  
Old 17th October 2011, 11:23
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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Retired Tony?I never started work,the reason I have time to swap yarns is that the missus has taken charge of the business.

As well as the pub I have always done a bit of antique dealing as well sadly the field I dealt in,georgian furniture, is now so in the doldrums that is there is little point in continuing so I have stopped.This leaves me with time on my hands.So until I find something else to do I have the opportunity to read these forums and they are so very entertaining.

I used to read one called Scousehouse,there were two very funny and informative contributors there both ex-masters,one from Liverpool and the other from Blackburn or somewhere up there.They had sailed tother as ABs and had done well the Liverpudlian had emigrated to Australia and he was a interesting informed man.his stories rang true and I enjoyed them.Sadly the site became clogged with the usual suspects,it all started with stories about bars in Valparaiso circa 1959 with federales being thrown through bar windows and deteriorated into postings about sweet shops in Tuebrook.Tony started an alternative site called The Seamans Hospital but it disappeared as there weren`t enough of us to keep the yarns going sad but there you go.
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  #49  
Old 1st July 2012, 10:43
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Mick Spear Mick Spear is offline  
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Alan,
I enjoy reading your posts mate. Please keep them coming. Further to your Ribs thread above. I rememeber when I was Pantry boy on Geest boats, we had sides of bacon that had to be boned. When a side was done, the Old man and Chief would be the recipients of the ribs. My job was to go down the Galley and pick them up. They would be wrapped up in Foil, sometimes they would be taken straight out of the Pea and Ham soup and other occasions just boiled or oven baked. I would usually sneak a Rib or two before passing on to the Tiger who would take them up to the Old Man and Chief. The ones taken straight from the Pea and Ham soup were delicious.
Mick S

Last edited by Mick Spear; 1st July 2012 at 10:45..
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  #50  
Old 1st July 2012, 11:24
alan ward alan ward is offline  
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A few years ago I had a pub down the road from where we are now.I was in the butchers and noticed he was selling ham hocks cheap so i bought a couple locked myself in the galley,cooked the hocks and used the second boiling water to make some pea and ham soup.A real thick green soup with lumps of the freshly cooked ham in it.We served it with croutons fried in butter and when I got the waiting on staff to try it before serving they didn`t like it.Never seen it before,didn`t like the meat in it,too thick,too this,too that.I put it on the menu and sold one!Peasants.
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