1:48 Model of Aberdeen Steam Trawler - Star of Freedom - Ships Nostalgia
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1:48 Model of Aberdeen Steam Trawler - Star of Freedom

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  #1  
Old 13th September 2012, 20:58
caledonia2006 caledonia2006 is offline  
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1:48 Model of Aberdeen Steam Trawler - Star of Freedom

Thought you might like to see some shots of a model of an Aberdeen Steam Trawler I finished recently. Model is an adaptation of the CalderCraft - Milford Star kit heavily modified. I cannot guarantee the accuracy as the model was based on two very poor quality B&W photos no plans are available. Have weathered the model to make it lok like a working ship. Hope you enjoy. Derek
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File Type: jpg F3.jpg (250.0 KB, 174 views)
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  #2  
Old 13th September 2012, 21:16
chadburn chadburn is offline  
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Memories of walking down to the Fish Market from Victoria Road early morning as a child with my Maternal Grandpa to have a look at the old steam job's.
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  #3  
Old 13th September 2012, 21:27
donald h donald h is offline  
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Very nice indeed, Derek.
You`ve made a really good job of her.

regards, Donald
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  #4  
Old 14th September 2012, 10:58
caledonia2006 caledonia2006 is offline  
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Thanks for viewing lads.

A few more shots, including one of the wheelhouse interior before it was closed up.

My late Father was a Trawl Skipper: commanded an ASW Trawler during WWII and when retired, he ferried Trawlers between Aberdeen and Hull/Grimsby. I remember in the 1950's very often going round the fish market on a Saturday Morning when the catches were being landed. Remember once during the school holidays, being on a Trawler when it came off the slipway and going out in the bay to do speed trials and compass adjustment. Derek
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File Type: jpg F11.jpg (242.8 KB, 141 views)
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  #5  
Old 15th September 2012, 12:57
jerome morris jerome morris is offline  
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Very Very Nice!!!
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  #6  
Old 16th September 2012, 10:45
nhp651 nhp651 is offline  
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that has to be the very nicest build of the "milford star" I have ever seen.......build one myself years ago and super detailed it.........but not nearly as nice as that beauty.
well done.
neil.
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  #7  
Old 16th September 2012, 12:43
caledonia2006 caledonia2006 is offline  
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Many thanks for your kind comments gents, glad you liked the photos.
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  #8  
Old 16th September 2012, 14:19
glojoh glojoh is offline  
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Amazing detail and I'm sure I can smell the fish!

Regarding the wheelhouse shot it has left me confused. Is the chart table up against the front of the bridge or at the rear? I ask this as the helm appears to be mounted so that the helmsman has his back to the charts? is that correct and the chart table is at the rear of the wheelhouse with all those windows offering a really nice view as the charts are being checked.

I have NEVER been aboard a trawler but usually the chart table is at the rear of the bridge on a warship.
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Old 16th September 2012, 14:40
caledonia2006 caledonia2006 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glojoh View Post
Amazing detail and I'm sure I can smell the fish!

Regarding the wheelhouse shot it has left me confused. Is the chart table up against the front of the bridge or at the rear? I ask this as the helm appears to be mounted so that the helmsman has his back to the charts? is that correct and the chart table is at the rear of the wheelhouse with all those windows offering a really nice view as the charts are being checked.

I have NEVER been aboard a trawler but usually the chart table is at the rear of the bridge on a warship.
Thanks for viewing and for your note. There were many different wheelhouse designs, I chose the one I remember as a boy, and confirmed when spending very many hours of googling researching the build.

In my case the chart table, which folded down was at the front of the wheelhouse, and the helmsman stood with his back to the wheel so that he could brace himself in rough seas, notice the duckboard position between the wheel and the binnacle. I have attached a few more shots looking through the doorway. Sorry two are on their side but I seem to be unable to upload 'portrait' orientated photos.

Let me know if you have any more queries. Derek

p.s. The hatch cover on the deck to the left of the wheel lead down to the Skippers cabin, which was almost coffin size, this is where the radio was installed.
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File Type: jpg B78.jpg (140.3 KB, 78 views)
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Last edited by caledonia2006; 16th September 2012 at 14:59.. Reason: p.s. added
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  #10  
Old 16th September 2012, 15:42
glojoh glojoh is offline  
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Hi Derek,
THANK you very much indeed for taking the time to answer my query and your description matches entirely how I envisaged everything.

My brain was telling me the helmsman\person would be standing on that duckboard with his back to the wheel and that is what was confusing me..

When I served with my old shipmate Able Seaman Horatio Nelson we would be lashed to the wheel to avoid being washed overboard

Much respect for the detail you have added and that weathering.

I'm sure a few drops of juice from a tin of 'herrings in' would be the icing on the cake but the pong might be a bit off putting.
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  #11  
Old 16th September 2012, 15:57
caledonia2006 caledonia2006 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glojoh View Post
Hi Derek,
THANK you very much indeed for taking the time to answer my query and your description matches entirely how I envisaged everything.

My brain was telling me the helmsman\person would be standing on that duckboard with his back to the wheel and that is what was confusing me..

When I served with my old shipmate Able Seaman Horatio Nelson we would be lashed to the wheel to avoid being washed overboard

Much respect for the detail you have added and that weathering.

I'm sure a few drops of juice from a tin of 'herrings in' would be the icing on the cake but the pong might be a bit off putting.
Not sure about the herring but I did hunt high and low for some 1:48 scale seagulls I would love to have added a couple and added further 'weathering' off the white seagull deposit variety, but sadly I never found any. Incidently the local fishermen in those days regarded seagulls as the spirit of fishermen lost at sea.

Below you will find a link to the history of the Star of Freedom, which changed name to the Robert Limbrick, which was lost with all hands. Derek

http://kilchoan.blogspot.co.uk/2011/...-limbrick.html
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  #12  
Old 16th September 2012, 16:42
glojoh glojoh is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caledonia2006 View Post
Not sure about the herring but I did hunt high and low for some 1:48 scale seagulls I would love to have added a couple and added further 'weathering' off the white seagull deposit variety, but sadly I never found any. Incidently the local fishermen in those days regarded seagulls as the spirit of fishermen lost at sea.

Below you will find a link to the history of the Star of Freedom, which changed name to the Robert Limbrick, which was lost with all hands. Derek

http://kilchoan.blogspot.co.uk/2011/...-limbrick.html
Thank you very much indeed for supplying that link and what a sad, sad ending. Looking at your model, then looking at that small boat on its stern really fetches home to you the awful situation the crew found themselves in. 100mph winds and taking to that boat was only ever going to have one ending!

We all talk about dangerous jobs but I have been off Iceland in hurricane force winds and witnessed small trawlers riding out those horrendous conditions and by crikey it was sight to behold!

A sad ending and whenever I look at your model, I will now always think about those very brave fishermen that lost their lives. Was this a reason why you built that specific vessel?
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  #13  
Old 16th September 2012, 18:39
caledonia2006 caledonia2006 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glojoh View Post
Thank you very much indeed for supplying that link and what a sad, sad ending. Looking at your model, then looking at that small boat on its stern really fetches home to you the awful situation the crew found themselves in. 100mph winds and taking to that boat was only ever going to have one ending!

We all talk about dangerous jobs but I have been off Iceland in hurricane force winds and witnessed small trawlers riding out those horrendous conditions and by crikey it was sight to behold!

A sad ending and whenever I look at your model, I will now always think about those very brave fishermen that lost their lives. Was this a reason why you built that specific vessel?
If you are sitting comfortably I will begin. I have always had this project in mind as a tribute to my late father. It was about two years ago I discovered that the CalderCraft Kit the Milford Star was in fact an old Aberdeen trawler.

http://www.cornwallmodelboats.co.uk/...ford_star.html

This is the only kit I have found of an Aberdeen Trawler, so was confined to this class. As I am sure you know the Admiralty during the last War built a large number of Minesweepers based on Trawler designs so that they could be quickly modified back to fishing after the war. The Sir Galahad was a Round Table Class Admiralty Trawler built along with three others by Hall, Russel, Aberdeen; 4 others were built by another Aberdeen shipyard John Lewis. After WWII the Walker Steam Trawling and Fishing Co. Ltd., of Aberdeen (hence the funnel) bought the vessel and renamed her Star of Freedom. I know my father who was a Trawl Skipper worked for this company on a number of occasions, but I cannot say that he skippered this particular Trawler. As with many Aberdeen Trawlers she was sold to Milford Haven and became the Robert Limbrick, although she kept her A283 Aberdeen registration, the rest you know. During WWII my father commander a number of ASW Trawlers, based at Leith, Milford Haven, Nigeria and Cape Town etc. So this Trawler links with a company my Father worked for, and a port he sailed from during the war.

There is an excellent book, see front cover below which details Trawler losses, which I found very moving. I recommend it to anyone with an interest in Trawling. Obviously Aberdeen was not the only port to suffer such losses the same story could be told all over Britain where there is a fishing community.

The wives of the fishermen very seldom get a mention, times between the wars were tough, with their men working a 14 day cycle of 11 to 12 days at sea and only 2 days at home they had to run the homes and bring up their families almost single handed. If their husbands were lost at sea, they were left almost destitute.

If anyone is interested I kept a build log of the Trawler, see the link below. You need to join the forum before you can view the pictures, its free and anonymous. It took 14 months to build the model.

http://www.scale-models.co.uk/boats-...ford-star.html

Sorry for being long winded, but I very much appreciate your continued interest in this project. I am currently researching the SY Scotia used in the 1902-04 Antarctic Expedition with a view to scratch building a model of her. Being an old Sealer/Whaler converted to steam she is, I think anyway, a very graceful vessel, see photo below. Derek
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Last edited by caledonia2006; 16th September 2012 at 18:43..
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  #14  
Old 16th September 2012, 18:49
glojoh glojoh is offline  
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Hi Derek,
Thank you for that update and as I said in my previous post, watching those fishermen working off the coast of Iceland in the middle of winter was a truly eye opening experience. On another thread there are posts about cruise ships 'rolling' in rough weather.... Something that just does not compare and I would say tongue in cheek that that vessel you have based your model on, would probably roll more when tied up alongside

Much respect to ALL those that allow me to enjoy my 'fish and chips'
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  #15  
Old 16th September 2012, 19:27
chadburn chadburn is offline  
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I only did the one trip on a fishing vessel out of Aberdeen on a R N Liason project, she was called the "Loch Kildonan" a long liner fishing for Cod off the North Cape and I have to admit I was "ill" until I got use to the motion (even worse than a Ton Class) and like the previous comment's I have every praise for those who provide me with my Friday Cod.
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Old 16th September 2012, 19:37
caledonia2006 caledonia2006 is offline  
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Thanks Gents, and to think if the Trawler didn't catch any fish, which wasn't uncommon in the winter, the Skipper and Mate who were on a share of the catch but got no wage could actually owe the Trawl owner for their food for those 12 days. So you went to sea for 11 - 12 days, got no wages and were in debt - no human rights or minumum wage then!!! Derek
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Old 17th September 2012, 15:55
chadburn chadburn is offline  
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Fortunatly the RN (FOSNI) paid mine!!
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  #18  
Old 18th September 2012, 07:07
vmr vmr is offline  
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Well Done Caledonia2006, A Fine Model, I Can Smell The Kippers!,VMR.
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  #19  
Old 19th September 2012, 12:50
caledonia2006 caledonia2006 is offline  
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Well Done Caledonia2006, A Fine Model, I Can Smell The Kippers!,VMR.
Many thanks glad you enjoyed.

Cheers Derek
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Old 26th September 2012, 22:44
raf1387 raf1387 is offline  
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I think you have done a good job with your model. My only comments would be on her colour scheme. Walkers ships had black hulls and grained wheelhouses, and casings.
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  #21  
Old 26th September 2012, 22:52
raf1387 raf1387 is offline  
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Oops just picked up another wee problem, these ships did not have binnacles inside the wheelhouse, they used an inverted compass fitted in the roof. I will check the builders drawings when I get home but if I remember the wheel was at the front of the wheelhouse but will confirm next week.
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Old 27th September 2012, 15:12
caledonia2006 caledonia2006 is offline  
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I think you have done a good job with your model. My only comments would be on her colour scheme. Walkers ships had black hulls and grained wheelhouses, and casings.
Thanks for your, comments. The model was based on the Caldercraft Kit, this is the only information I had for the build other than two black and white photo's and childhood memories, so inaccuracies are inevitable.

Whilst spending many hours 'googling' I found this colour photo taken in Aberdeen in the early 60's of one of her sister ships the 'Star of Orkney' which shows a green hull. This is what I based the model colour on, also I wanted a green hull as I remembered some of my fathers Trawlers having green hulls, think they are more attractive. Derek
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  #23  
Old 27th September 2012, 15:15
caledonia2006 caledonia2006 is offline  
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Originally Posted by raf1387 View Post
Oops just picked up another wee problem, these ships did not have binnacles inside the wheelhouse, they used an inverted compass fitted in the roof. I will check the builders drawings when I get home but if I remember the wheel was at the front of the wheelhouse but will confirm next week.
Would loved to have had the set of drawings you have during the build, you should consider donating a copy of them to the Aberdeen Maritime Museum, as the only drawing they have is a G.A. when they were minesweepers.

Can I ask where you got your drawings from?

Derek

Last edited by caledonia2006; 27th September 2012 at 16:04..
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  #24  
Old 1st October 2012, 22:39
nhp651 nhp651 is offline  
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Originally Posted by raf1387 View Post
Oops just picked up another wee problem, these ships did not have binnacles inside the wheelhouse, they used an inverted compass fitted in the roof. I will check the builders drawings when I get home but if I remember the wheel was at the front of the wheelhouse but will confirm next week.
Much of a critic as you are Raf1387, I think you'll find that the wheel was at the rear of the wheel house, as the geering was here, and also the drive to the outside chain rollers for the steering chains and rods that connected them which ran down the side of the superstructure to the steering rods and thence aft to the rudder quadrant.
Had the steering wheel been at the front of the wheelhouse you'd have had steering rods inside the wheelhouse from the front to rear of the house and there connecting to the steering chains.....this was just not so.
I build the same model years ago, but I actually used John Lamberts plans to aid me, and they clearly showed the wheel aft of the wheelhouse, ..........and they also showed the binnacle inside the wheel house whith compensaters attached, with a repeater compass on the compass pole, not on the wheelhouse top..bearing in mind that although all these Round table class boats did become trawlers, they were in fact build as anti sub escorts and minesweepers, and had as such an upper conning position with a telegraph and binnacle, and not a pole compass.that was added after their service in the RN finished..hope this clears up the problem, and as such Caledonean has made a very realistic and true replica of that type of vessel.
Neil.

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  #25  
Old 2nd October 2012, 13:23
glojoh glojoh is offline  
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To me it is a model, a very NICE model and the layout of that wheelhouse is the layout the modeller wants and believes to be correct.

No doubt if there are pictures that might suggest this rendition of that specific vessel is inaccurate, then that would probably be appreciated but unless that is forthcoming then it looks amazing and I'm sure I can now smell the whiff of rotting fish
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