500 kHz Recordings A9M - Page 19 - Ships Nostalgia
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500 kHz Recordings A9M

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  #451  
Old 16th April 2018, 15:37
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 khz Recording SSB signal across the Pond on 500 kHz

Greetings,

Perhaps some of you will be interested in my recording of WE2XGR6
on 510 kHz using SSB , I was transmitting on 501.3 kHz. You can hear Bob describe the problem he was having with ice on his antenna wires. We worked one another at 0104 on the 1st of December 2008.

Bob is located in Penn Yan, in New York State, southeast of Rochester.
Rochester is on the shore of Lake Ontario. Penn Yan is located, between Lake Kenuka and Lake Seneca, at approx 42 39 36 North
77 3 20 West.

A very rough distance to my QTH was 5180 km.

As far as I know, this was the first contact across the Atlantic using voice to a fellow radio experimenter. My transmitter was a solid state rig, driving a valve Linear amp using a pair of 4-400 valves in grounded grip configuration. Bob's rig was a big valve transmitter,
running 900 watts input and estimated to give about 500 watts output, but the de-tuning effect of the ice on the antenna did not help with the efficiencey that night, he explained.

The 500 kHz band is no longer available to radio amateurs, we have moved to the new allocation of 472 to 479 kHz.

Best regards
Finbar EJM retired EI0CF / GI4DPE
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File Type: mp3 WE2XGR6mf0205utc01122008MOD1.mp3 (413.1 KB, 79 views)
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  #452  
Old 11th May 2018, 05:10
djringjr djringjr is offline  
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A9M was a great station. I also liked SUP Port Said, and I am the guilty party who couldn't send my ship's callsign, WJGH to NMA USCG Miami.
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  #453  
Old 11th May 2018, 12:55
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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#527 . Yes A9M (Bahrain) was an OK station. Sorry you had trouble with sending WJGH, Dj, but I'm sure NMA were quite patient. All those USCG stations were pretty good and often didn't mind a bit of a joke.

John T
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  #454  
Old 25th May 2018, 01:27
majoco majoco is offline  
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Very interesting posts on this forum - thanks guys. Unfortunately the local QRM here precludes any proper LF DX but this little tale might amuse.
July 1967 leaving the Perishin' Gulf for Adelaide on the Naess Sovereign C/S eludes me. Very early morning through the Straits of Hormuz, the Old Man gave me the departure message the day before but HF conditions were terrible so I gave it a try first thing. Looking for GKA I hear Niton calling with his traffic list on the other receiver - followed him down to 464kHz and tuned the Globespan on 468 - as soon as he finished his list - no traffic so I gave him a quick call - blow me down he answered! Sent my MSG and a couple of others - then he asked for a TR as I wasn't on his list - I had to confirm that I meant what I said before he believed me! Went back to 500 and it sounded like I was back on the Geordie colliers! 10 minutes later and they were all gone - must have been what we now know as the 'Grey Line' but was just a fluke then.
Since then I have used the Grey Line to get into Europe and worked a couple of French stations from NZ on the bottom of 80m from where I used to live on a perfect launch site looking down a hill to the Northwest sea - unfortunately a pipedream from my new QTH.
Best regards - Martin ZL2MC
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  #455  
Old 25th May 2018, 19:33
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Hello Martin - GHFJ is what you were trying to think of. I was there in 1963 - joined in Rotterdam when the T50MH was fitted.

David

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  #456  
Old 23rd July 2018, 14:38
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 khz Recordings MV Tabor radio room

Hello Mike,

Thanks for you message which I received today. You have prompted me to search my picture library and found a shot of the radio room of the MV Tabor, which both of us sailed on as juniors, way back in the early 1970's.

The picture shows my Chief RO, Des Walsh, who still lives, up the coast from Liverpool.

You will spot the Oceanspan transmitter and Reliant emergency transmitter, a Mercury or Electra receiver ( not sure which one it is)
and the Marconi morse key.

What a great ship and crew, lots of interesting ports in the Meddy,
out with general cargo, then finally Haifa or Ashdod , to load
Citrus fruits for the UK. Wisely, every member of the crew got a
crate of oranges ( to stop pilfering I expect). The hatch boars were
lifted at the ends, to aid airflow. The fruit came on quite green and
matured on our way back home.

Best regards
Finbar EJM retired EI0CF
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File Type: jpg DesWalshTabor.jpg (137.6 KB, 120 views)
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  #457  
Old 11th September 2018, 16:23
fonito fonito is offline  
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Thanks to everyone who posted so beautifull sounds.
FBM retired w.o.
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  #458  
Old 11th September 2018, 16:44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by majoco View Post
Very interesting posts on this forum - thanks guys. Unfortunately the local QRM here precludes any proper LF DX but this little tale might amuse.
July 1967 leaving the Perishin' Gulf for Adelaide on the Naess Sovereign C/S eludes me. Very early morning through the Straits of Hormuz, the Old Man gave me the departure message the day before but HF conditions were terrible so I gave it a try first thing. Looking for GKA I hear Niton calling with his traffic list on the other receiver - followed him down to 464kHz and tuned the Globespan on 468 - as soon as he finished his list - no traffic so I gave him a quick call - blow me down he answered! Sent my MSG and a couple of others - then he asked for a TR as I wasn't on his list - I had to confirm that I meant what I said before he believed me! Went back to 500 and it sounded like I was back on the Geordie colliers! 10 minutes later and they were all gone - must have been what we now know as the 'Grey Line' but was just a fluke then.
Since then I have used the Grey Line to get into Europe and worked a couple of French stations from NZ on the bottom of 80m from where I used to live on a perfect launch site looking down a hill to the Northwest sea - unfortunately a pipedream from my new QTH.
Best regards - Martin ZL2MC
That's astonishing, Martin. I was r/o in the 50/60s, but Grey Line is a term I don't know. Can you explain what sort of phenomena it is?
regards
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  #459  
Old 11th September 2018, 20:02
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I do not recollect Grey Line when at sea but working point to point on HF it was very noticeable as a circuit would slowly fade out towards the evening then suddenly peak for about half an hour , often a stronger signal than during the day. However, after that half hour the signal would disappear completely.
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  #460  
Old 12th September 2018, 00:08
majoco majoco is offline  
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The grey line is that line around the globe where the sun is just setting or rising - what we would call 'dusk'. The low D layer has not yet been energized on the sunrise side, and is rapidly dissipating on the sunset side, resulting in low absorption. The net result: For a period ranging from a few minutes at low and high frequencies to one or two hours at intermediate frequencies, with suitable ionospheric conditions, stations in the twilight zone can communicate with any other stations in the twilight zone. It's like reflecting your signal off the sloping side of the ionosphere. As I said, I have worked, often only for a few seconds, stations along the Mediterranean coast from NZ on the CW portion of the 80m ham band and then the signal fades and I get someone else further along to the west as the twilight line passes along.

My 'antipode' is just west of Madrid, just about where Radio Exterior d'Espana has his transmitters. Listening on his old 6MHz frequency the signal would build up to 20dB over s9 for about 5 minutes then slowly fade away to almost nothing, this was followed by the RAF Volmet from Northolt on 5450kHz peaking up and down, then Shannon Volmet on 5505kHz, then.... nothing!
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  #461  
Old 12th September 2018, 00:28
majoco majoco is offline  
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Bit off topic but going back to "VIB now an HF aircraft station".

The use of aircraft using HF radio is actually quite busy, even though "CPDLC" (Controller–pilot data link communications) is becoming more common in newer aircraft. It is still quite a slow method of communication via a satellite - it doesn't have the instant response you get from actually talking to the Air Traffic Controller, although you are often hearing only the radio operator, the man with his plotter who knows where all the aircraft are (or thinks he does....) is down the other end of a telephone or teleprinter. Australia still uses HF radio internally too, distances are too vast to cover with VHF radio. For the South Pacific zone, try listening on 13261 or 8867 kHz USB, for all the world's zones and frequencies click on the link below to download this magnificent chart...

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=hf...Ik3Ta_qqgYbKM:
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Last edited by majoco; 12th September 2018 at 00:30..
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  #462  
Old 12th September 2018, 03:02
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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#461 . "Bit off topic but going back to "VIB now an HF aircraft station".

Thanks for that, Majoco. I often drive past the station and wonder what goes on in there now. I also wonder what happened to the white marble bust of Marconi that used to stand in front of the building.

John T
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  #463  
Old 12th September 2018, 09:15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Finbar O'Connor View Post
Greetings,




The 500 kHz band is no longer available to radio amateurs, we have moved to the new allocation of 472 to 479 kHz.
Yes, amateurs were kicked off 5 ton by maritime regulators at ITU. 5 ton is supposed to be used for a new high speed version of NAVTEX called NAVDAT.

To date, nothing has happened....
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  #464  
Old 13th September 2018, 14:17
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Originally Posted by majoco View Post
The grey line is that line around the globe where the sun is just setting or rising - what we would call 'dusk'. The low D layer has not yet been energized on the sunrise side, and is rapidly dissipating on the sunset side, resulting in low absorption. The net result: For a period ranging from a few minutes at low and high frequencies to one or two hours at intermediate frequencies, with suitable ionospheric conditions, stations in the twilight zone can communicate with any other stations in the twilight zone. It's like reflecting your signal off the sloping side of the ionosphere. As I said, I have worked, often only for a few seconds, stations along the Mediterranean coast from NZ on the CW portion of the 80m ham band and then the signal fades and I get someone else further along to the west as the twilight line passes along.

My 'antipode' is just west of Madrid, just about where Radio Exterior d'Espana has his transmitters. Listening on his old 6MHz frequency the signal would build up to 20dB over s9 for about 5 minutes then slowly fade away to almost nothing, this was followed by the RAF Volmet from Northolt on 5450kHz peaking up and down, then Shannon Volmet on 5505kHz, then.... nothing!
Thanks, Martin. That is clear. Also, just looked it up on the web for extra info. The Terminator moves at 1,000km/hr, so you have to catch it on the move. I do recall odd long distance hops, but I was not aware of the cause at the time.
Harry
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  #465  
Old 23rd September 2018, 12:45
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The late Graham Mercer whilst at GPK occasionally worked ships in the Pacific via Greyline. Very short QSOs conducted on 1883 kkz from GPK and an IF frequency from the ship.
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  #466  
Old 23rd September 2018, 13:37
jimg0nxx jimg0nxx is offline  
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When I was into Amateur Radio worked all round the world on Top Band (around 1830KHz) using Greyline. The furthest I worked was Auckland Island, SSW of New Zealand which is about as close to my Antipode as possible. When conditions were good I worked Alaska and California which were particularly difficult. Japan and Australia could be worked most evenings.
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  #467  
Old 3rd October 2018, 14:27
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 khz Recording Anglesey Radio GLV

Greetings,

Attached is a recording of Anglesey Radio GLV.

Very few recordings of this station, that I know of, from this
coast radio station, which closed on the 19th December 1986.

Regards
Finbar EI0CF EJM retired
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File Type: mp3 GLV1Filter.mp3 (78.5 KB, 86 views)
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  #468  
Old 14th May 2019, 13:30
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 khz Recordings PJC

Greetings,

Here is a short recording of PJC, well known station from Curacao, in the Caribbean.

Enjoy.

Finbar EJM retired EI0CF
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File Type: mp3 PJC.mp3 (97.4 KB, 44 views)
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  #469  
Old 14th May 2019, 20:20
sparks69 sparks69 is offline  
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I remember in the 60's another R/O called me up and informed me "The skips are in !!!!!"
I spent an interesting half hour QSX to various stns.
Happy daze
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  #470  
Old Today, 19:12
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Worked PJC a few times on the Bitumen run. This was leaving the berth and starting to head out passed the pontoon bridge. There is some sort of aerial system visible on the left, so wonder if that was PJC ??

David
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