Malta moorings - Ships Nostalgia
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Malta moorings

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  #1  
Old 14th November 2016, 15:46
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Malta moorings

A query came up on another site regarding the first drawing and what the four digit numbers were adjacent to the moorings.
My guess would be lengths, but what units would they be using? cable links?

The second two images I have taken from a book which indicates the moorings and numbers with lengths indicated on the table.

I used to do some of the survey drawings but it is oh so long ago, like 1957.

Relying for ex PAS experts for an answer.
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File Type: jpg moorings.jpg (199.5 KB, 67 views)
File Type: jpg valhx.jpg (386.0 KB, 71 views)
File Type: jpg valh2x.jpg (60.7 KB, 43 views)
File Type: jpg YC 389 in Sliema Creek.jpg (94.2 KB, 58 views)
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Last edited by twogrumpy; 14th November 2016 at 15:58..
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  #2  
Old 14th November 2016, 16:02
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I have no idea really TwoGrumpy but as someone who 'did' a lot of mooring work they look like schematics of trot mooring systems or a series of head & stern systems; each one being numbered - a berth number perhaps? The long numbers above and below are in sequence but what they are representing escapes me I'm afraid.

What's needed is a mooring officer from the 1950s!
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  #3  
Old 14th November 2016, 16:09
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"What's needed is a mooring officer from the 1950s!"

Perhaps I should hold a seance, "dad, dad, speak to me"
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Old 14th November 2016, 23:27
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Could they be 'shackles', which I seem to remember were either 12 or 15 fathoms?

Taff
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Old 15th November 2016, 15:01
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Just got this of Grand Harbour.

Noting that the wharfs also have these four digit numbers, and more of them for the big ship berths, is it possible they are telephone numbers?
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Old 15th November 2016, 16:16
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15 fathoms in a shackle Taff.
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Old 15th November 2016, 23:32
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Thanks, Enri. I was just wondering if the numbers were missing a decimal place (comma in some countries)... eg., 7703=77.03/77,03. I have noted some Europeans write similar numbers, not using the decimal until the total.

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Old 16th November 2016, 14:25
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Like you I was wondering about a decimal point though nothing seemed to match.
The poster of the prints had one where a four digit number, similar to the others is shown inland, about where Ricasoli wireless station would have been, and with other input we are going for telephone numbers.

So nothing nautical at all from the look of it, thanks for your help.

A little more information.

MOORING BUOYS & TELEPHONES

A little more info ~ I did a bit of checking with another who was in the Med. fleet in the early 1950's and has a good memory:
"Each buoy in Sliema, Grand Harbour and all the other creeks such as Lazzeretto and Msida had a telephone point in our time. Then on all small ships destroyers and below at 2200 each evening the duty LCW [Local Command Wave - radio frequency] operator requested permission to close down for five minutes while a phone call was made to the Lascaris MSO [Main Signal Office] – once contact was made you then reset watch on LCW and sent the good old signal 'closing down for the night until 0600 next morning.' Large ships and the duty destroyer - frigate maintained a 24 hour watch.'

A further piece from the same source:
"The phone was on the gangway for the QM [Quarter Master] to answer – certainly all the flag ships had teleprinters, as we on Tyne did or rather it was up in the MSO [Main Signal Office] (FOF1) for the use of F.O.F. Med this was moved to Manoel Island when Tyne left for Korea and relieved by Ranpura who flew his flag only no room aboard for the MSO and wireless office were moved ashore to Manoel Island (call-sign MTP) alongside the Canteen and F.O.F.s offices were down at the Diving School phones in both areas in fact two lines in the MSO – us lads who manned the Coms office and the signalmen for the signal tower above the Canteen were messed in a few Nissan huts (pictures attached) which included a galley and dining area where we had our own Maltese Chef one Joshi Assopardi a retired officers cook we collected daily from Humrun – boy did we feed well - we were canteen messing and Joshi made the finest scotch eggs I have ever tasted and from the dress on attached photo you will see it was a bit like Fred Karno’s army there, when off watch wore civvies most time and the lads with their families brought them round regularly and we had a dog called tiger who we rescued from the creek – the Forth also had teleprinters call sign SUB1."
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Last edited by twogrumpy; 16th November 2016 at 21:33..
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Old 19th November 2016, 11:32
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Twogrumpy, according to a recently retired salvage officer who spent time in Malta the Sliema moorings were mostly a series of head and stern moorings for small vessels. The inner (or the ones near the bottom of the map) moorings were for lighters and barges and he surmises that the four figure numbers may well be barge numbers. I'm hoping to get more information from him some time in the future.

The other drawing showing AFD 35 piqued his interest as he thinks he has some photos somewhere of the salvage of the dock. The dock was sunk at some point and 'rediscovered' when deepening operations took place. The dock had to be cut in two to raise it. He thinks it capsized at some point.

If I get more info' I'll pass it on.
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Old 19th November 2016, 14:14
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We would certainly be interested be interested in any further information that turns up, thank you.

In my time the two rows of moorings in Sliema Creek would be occupied by frigates and destroyers, No. 6 berth was the home for much of the time for the Manxman.
I believe I saw a picture of AFD floating dock, back end right down after the bombing, but this is only from memory.

Image of The Creek at its best, one of the old YC mooring vessels can be seen between the top two rows of ships
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  #11  
Old 26th November 2016, 13:21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twogrumpy View Post
We would certainly be interested be interested in any further information that turns up, thank you.

In my time the two rows of moorings in Sliema Creek would be occupied by frigates and destroyers, No. 6 berth was the home for much of the time for the Manxman.
I believe I saw a picture of AFD floating dock, back end right down after the bombing, but this is only from memory.

Image of The Creek at its best, one of the old YC mooring vessels can be seen between the top two rows of ships
Wow! That's what I call a full system of moorings. I'll forward it to my retired salvage man and see what he makes of it.
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  #12  
Old 26th November 2016, 14:17
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Of the many images around of The Creek I think this is my favorite,
sums the place up a treat, mid 50's I think, before the aerials started to sprout from every roof to pick up Italian TV.
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