Crankshaft failure - Ships Nostalgia
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Crankshaft failure

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  #1  
Old 21st July 2010, 18:11
double acting double acting is offline  
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Crankshaft failure

A CalMac ferry, the Clansman, is at present out of service "due to mechanical problems" as they tell the Press. Apparently it has a broken crankshaft, can any one throw any light on what actually happened? In 15 years at sea I've never experienced such a breakdown.
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  #2  
Old 21st July 2010, 18:36
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Satanic Mechanic Satanic Mechanic is offline  
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Don;t know what has happened to the Clansman but they are not that unusual a failure.

Actual fracture is very uncommon but pin damage from an overheating bearing is well known. Basically the pin gets so hot that you get surface cracks which have to be ground out and an undersized bearing put in. This of course alters the load carrying capacity but normally a repair can be carried out at least once on a pin . The worst I saw was bottom end bearing on B&W 6S60MCC that we removed 8mm of the dia mter and still had enough meat left to repeat the repair without derating the engine.

Another favourite are 'lightseeking' con rods - usually a fracture caused by a casting fault - that is a crankshaft full replacement job. Nasty nasty job on a generator - truly horrible on a slowspeed main -you need to cut holes in the side and all sorts. I replaced a 4.8MW generator a couple of years ago because of this - everything except the actual bedplate. BIG JOB.

The last actual fractured crankshfrt I saw was a couple of months ago on a high speed gene, in this case it was a pretty obvious fatigue fracture initiating in the crank throw. I have got an endoscope video I took somewhere - might try and dig it out. In this case because of the size we just swapped it for a new one
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  #3  
Old 21st July 2010, 21:10
albatross1923 albatross1923 is offline  
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This is a Crankshaft failure brought about starting the engine with a water leak in one of
the cylinders moving the crankweb round the pin the repair is very unique using 4 tons
of liquid oxygen
google
presidentschoice.imeche.org.uk./crankshaft

ALBATROSS 1923

Last edited by albatross1923; 22nd July 2010 at 12:12.. Reason: website
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  #4  
Old 21st July 2010, 21:41
John Dryden John Dryden is offline  
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I must admit that when a Bank Line ship lost power it was always mid ocean and our engineers were a spectacle to watch, changing the big bits with big spanners and the perfect silence broken by a newly repaired engine kicking in.After the silence.

Last edited by John Dryden; 21st July 2010 at 21:42.. Reason: addition
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  #5  
Old 21st July 2010, 22:07
surfaceblow surfaceblow is offline  
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When I was on the Cape Hudson its sister ship the Cape Horn add to replaced it's crankshaft due to fractures found in the crank after undergoing a ABS bearing inspection. While the ship was in the Middle East some of the Main Engine Bearings had come due for ABS Inspection on a B & W K series engine. While I was having some of the Main Bearings inspected on the Hudson I found that the Computerized inventory system identified the Main Bearing Jack location but on opening the box the jacks had the Camshaft stamped on the jacks. Since the jacks are bigger than the Main Bearing Jacks they were not used to refit the bearings after inspection. On the Cape Hudson we had a new jack fabricated. On the Cape Horn had earlier had some of their Main Engine Bearings inspected by ABS and also had an outside contractor do the work.

The Cape Hudson left the Middle East and headed back to the US while the Cape Horn arrived in the US about six months after us. On the Cape Horn's arrival some more Main Bearings required inspection when it was found that the crankshaft suffered fractures.

Officially there was no reason found for the fractures but we assumed that the Cape Horn also had the Bearing Jacks misidentified and used the bigger camshaft jacks to overtightened the bearings and that they did not do a complete feel down on the engine after the bearing work.

To remove the crankshaft on the Cape Horn the top of the engine room was removed a second crane was installed in the cargo hold. The Main Engine was removed from the engine room in three sections. After the new crank was installed and all of the bits put back it took another month of adjustments to try to get to the like new clearances but that was never accomplished. While the deflections and clearances were better than before the work the clearances was nowhere near the new clearances.
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  #6  
Old 21st July 2010, 22:35
uisdean mor uisdean mor is offline  
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Not gospel but as close to the horses mouth as you can get. Tail shaft bearing went and this was not picked up quickly enough. Threw the shafts out of line and significant further damage occurred.
As stated not gospel so treat with caution. My sources are passengers and some fellow engineers travelling ( or not ) regularly on the Barra run.
Rgds
uisdean
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  #7  
Old 22nd July 2010, 16:51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Dryden View Post
I must admit that when a Bank Line ship lost power it was always mid ocean and our engineers were a spectacle to watch, changing the big bits with big spanners and the perfect silence broken by a newly repaired engine kicking in.After the silence.
It was one of the many things we were paid to do. Though if we did the rest of our jobs properly it did not happen too often.

Peter Smith
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  #8  
Old 22nd July 2010, 18:41
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Alistair Macnab Alistair Macnab is offline  
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Main Engines Failure

The Houston (Texas) Pilots had let it be known that the old twin screw blast jobs of Bank Line were unreliable within the confines of the Houston Ship Channel above Morgans Point. This lead to there always being a tug lying off the Point and offering its services to all Bank Boats. Ships had to be warned that unless there was some doubt about the ship's reliability, on no account was a tug service to be taken. Nevertheless, the Tug Boat Company always stationed a tug every time a Bank Boat came up Galveston Bay 'just in case'! It was long after the old blast jobs had departed from the fleet before the stand-by tug was discontinued.
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  #9  
Old 22nd July 2010, 22:36
An Tirisdeach An Tirisdeach is offline  
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Clansman

Quote:
Originally Posted by uisdean mor View Post
DA
Not gospel but as close to the horses mouth as you can get. Tail shaft bearing went and this was not picked up quickly enough. Threw the shafts out of line and significant further damage occurred.
As stated not gospel so treat with caution. My sources are passengers and some fellow engineers travelling ( or not ) regularly on the Barra run.
Rgds
uisdean
There was no problem with the tail shaft, the crankshaft was not broken, but damaged by other failed components, and a new one is being fitted.

Last edited by An Tirisdeach; 23rd July 2010 at 06:31..
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  #10  
Old 1st August 2010, 06:37
mrcanoehead mrcanoehead is offline  
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Was the Cape Horn & Hudson former BARBER boats, used to see them in Norfolk Virginia , at the lamberts point container terminal in the 1980's
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  #11  
Old 1st August 2010, 18:45
surfaceblow surfaceblow is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrcanoehead View Post
Was the Cape Horn & Hudson former BARBER boats, used to see them in Norfolk Virginia , at the lamberts point container terminal in the 1980's
Yes both were ex Barber Line ships. The Cape Hudson was the Barber Taif completed 1 June 1979 and the Cape Horn was the Barber Tonsberg completed 4 July 1979. Both ships were converted for military use and controlled by MARAD with outside contractors operating the ships. At the time I was onboard the vessels MTL had the contract to operate the three H's plus the Cape D's. I also spent some time at Lamberts Point.

Joe
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  #12  
Old 1st August 2010, 18:58
borderreiver borderreiver is offline  
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Borderhunter doxford engine had crankcase fracture in Japan welded up come home of half power while a new one was made.
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  #13  
Old 2nd August 2010, 09:28
david freeman david freeman is offline  
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Deep water Trawlers out of Hull, could give an insite into interesting engine failures. One medium speed 2000hp main engine trawler was towed home with a completely fractured main crankshaft. This was alluded too an all welded bedplate not correctly secured to an all rivetted ship frames and shell. Hence the bedplate was free to walk, and the result was a broken crankshaft. All this in class up to date and insured vessel.

Last edited by david freeman; 2nd August 2010 at 09:29.. Reason: check
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  #14  
Old 2nd August 2010, 09:46
J Boyde J Boyde is offline  
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The Ashburton had a small crakshaft problem. They started the engine with water in one, as I remember, unit. Result, the engine had the unit twisted 13 deg and the result of effects on the rest of the engine. Engine BW fourstroke. They dragged out from the wharf and left her sitting on the pick at Numeau.
I was one of three who flew from the UK to help bring her back. Metalex (?) from nz also joined the ship. The patched every head while in Fiji, then we spent 29 days crossing the pacific to Panama, where all new heads were put on. We broke day every day, interesting, it pn;y broke down when we were trying to sleep. Liverpool, we were not alowed to stop the engine until we had tigs on. Emptied then down to the Tyne where there pulled half the engine out to line it up. 3 months later, they haded he over the Manners. Al least they seemed to have a large number of fitters, along with the engineers whenthey took over.
Jim B
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  #15  
Old 7th August 2010, 01:01
ted harrison ted harrison is offline  
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Reading the posts on cranckshaft failure reminds me of my time on the Iron Horse (4 cyl Doxford). We were outward bound from Birkenhead to Seven Islands (About Aug 62' I think). Crossing the Mersey Bar we managed to colloide with the pilot cutter. The emergency full astern was dealt with (not very competently by all accounts) by the 2/eng whose watch is was. After inspection by the Lloyds man a cement box was fitted to our damaged bow and off we went. Rounding the north coast of Ireland the crankshaft broke assunder followed by a crankcase fire. We had the excitement of a deep sea tow into Scotts of Greenock (where incidently she was built). The NEM in Wallsend-on-Tyne won the contract and off we went again under tow, first north about but after as many hours going backwards through the Pentland, turned about and round the other way to the Tyne. A new crankshaft was fitted and we sailed for Vitoria just before Christmas. I was 4th Eng at the time but moved up to 3rd and spent 23 months on her altogether. Great ship, Great company.
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  #16  
Old 14th August 2010, 16:03
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Ian J. Huckin Ian J. Huckin is offline  
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Does this qualify?? I can see some surface defects.........
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Crank.jpg (330.5 KB, 254 views)
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  #17  
Old 14th August 2010, 19:46
Billieboy Billieboy is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian J. Huckin View Post
Does this qualify?? I can see some surface defects.........
Looks like a bit of pitting on the mains!
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  #18  
Old 23rd November 2012, 21:44
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averheijden averheijden is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by albatross1923 View Post
This is a Crankshaft failure brought about starting the engine with a water leak in one of
the cylinders moving the crankweb round the pin the repair is very unique using 4 tons of liquid oxygen

ALBATROSS 1923
Full Story, mv EASTERN ROVER

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  #19  
Old 23rd November 2012, 22:35
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Here is a major crankshaft repair on a brand new ship and engine.

http://capetownphotographer.photoshe...000ABTLIqvgdds

Awesome engineering. must have been a Scottish Chief involved in the repair.
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  #20  
Old 23rd November 2012, 23:09
chadburn chadburn is offline  
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If you type MV Eastern Rover in google there are some interesting photograph's of Doxford Engine failure's.
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  #21  
Old 24th November 2012, 15:41
forthbridge forthbridge is offline  
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Benlarig about 1962 I think probably second or 3rd voyage after she had been bought from Prince Line. A very loud bang while manoeuvering up the Elbe to Hamburg. Examination showed broken crankshaft coupling bolts.
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  #22  
Old 24th November 2012, 16:53
JIMMY HAMILTON JIMMY HAMILTON is offline  
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many years ago we had a broken Crankshaft on an R6 kelvin in the calmac ferry Eigg,only indication of it happening was the revs dropped to less than normal idle speed, the engine continued to run on the back cylinder, the break was so clean that the other 5 cylinders were stopped.. cause was put down to the bottom end nuts had slackened off while torquing the heads.. the same bolt went right thro' holding the heads .. the cyl block.. and bottom ends.. think it happened to more than one of the Island class ferrys while they had R6 Kelvins..

Last edited by JIMMY HAMILTON; 24th November 2012 at 16:55..
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Old 25th November 2012, 01:44
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Varley Varley is offline   SN Supporter
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I saw photo's of an oversped LS engine of a converted livestock carrier - I wish I could remember more details of her - Australia to Gulf run.

The overspeed had thrown out the bottom end (all of it!). To substitute for the crankshaft's missing pin a steel plate had been shaped around the two adjacent webs. I was told that the vessel did another round trip before the Autralian authorities said 'enough'.

The photo was from someone just employed as C/E on the newly (almost) delivered Kommandor Subsea - George?

Last edited by Varley; 25th November 2012 at 18:53..
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  #24  
Old 25th November 2012, 15:31
RFARoy RFARoy is offline  
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Ref: Broken Crankshafts - Perhaps someone from the RFA brethren may confirm my hazy memory about the RFA Dewdale (9-cylinder B & W), whilst fully laden from the Gulf sailing south down the East African coast, probably around 1971; I think the crank cleanly sheared around No.6 cylinder probably forward of a main crank bearing therefore the crankshaft was still being supported fore and aft of cylinders No’s 7, 8 & 9 which were still connected to prop-shaft. The engineers somehow rigged the three remaining cylinders to fire in sequence and I think she came all the way back to the UK under her own power abet very slowly, not sure where she finally docked or if she had to have assistance once she reached the Channel approaches or not.

RFARoy
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  #25  
Old 25th November 2012, 15:51
howardws howardws is offline  
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We had a bent crankshaft on the port Pielstick PC3 on MV Eagle. Although I was on leave I was purifier king and got the blame. It didn't do my career much harm, they needed a Second Engineer in a hurry in another port and someone remembered my name! I stayed there for the next 25 years.

Very interesting watching a main engine dismantled, the entablature lifted, the crankshaft moved outboard and then posted through a large letter box cut in the car deck.
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